University of The People Masters in Education M.Ed

Discussion in 'General Distance Learning Discussions' started by Futuredegree, Aug 19, 2020.

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  1. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly Staff Member

    Johann's right, they only have application and exam fees. Will those go up? Who knows?

    Yes. And sometimes people purposefully roll the dice on that sort of situation. But it's a gamble.
     
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  2. Rich Douglas

    Rich Douglas Well-Known Member

    That's a complicated question.

    Technically speaking, the accreditation status of the school when you graduate is what matters, not when you enroll, and not some future date after accreditation. But reality is a bit different.

    Degrees from schools that were awarded prior to accreditation tend to get treated as coming from accredited schools--even if, technically, the degrees were awarded before accreditation occurred. I'm sure this condition makes a lot of PhDs from California Coast University very happy, even though CCU never awarded the PhD as an accredited school.

    The distinction of when the degree was awarded vis a vis when accreditation occurred does not seem to come into play much.

    The other way: what if an accredited school awards degrees and then subsequently loses its accreditation (or goes out of business)? Technically, the degrees came from an accredited school. However, this is sometimes harder to establish; graduates can be somewhat harmed because their school no longer appears in certain listings as an accredited school. But technically.....
     
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  3. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    Reminds me of the unfortunate situation of people awaiting DEAC accreditation for Nations University. Students were delaying their final courses etc. as long as possible, hoping to get the benefits of accreditation. But as luck would have it (always a gamble) there were setbacks and the whole process took about SIX YEARS! Quite a few found themselves in a position where they had delayed graduation for as long as possible and had to finish, accredited or not, or risk losing their chance at the degree entirely.

    There were some severely disappointed people.
     
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  4. innen_oda

    innen_oda Member

    It's a terrible name, and as much as the M.Ed and the moves towards regional accreditation interest me, I'm just not sure I could bring myself to put 'University of the People' on my CV. Might as well put 'School of Hard Knocks, University of Life' as well then.
     
  5. Maniac Craniac

    Maniac Craniac Moderator Staff Member

    That last one actually exists... and is regionally accredited.

    https://www.life.edu/online/
     
  6. chrisjm18

    chrisjm18 Well-Known Member

    Well, not entirely. There's Life University down in GA, which is what you shared. I don't know of a University of Life...

    The University of Saint Joseph (CT) is not the same as Saint Joseph's University (PA).

    Just being technical lol
     
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  7. Maniac Craniac

    Maniac Craniac Moderator Staff Member

    Yes, technically true. The University of Life is longer, harder, and much more expensive than Life University.
     
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  8. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    And sometimes one wonders .... is it REALLY worth it? :)
     
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  9. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    Usual reply: "Nah, but let's do it anyway. Some courses are more fun than others..."
     
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  10. chrisjm18

    chrisjm18 Well-Known Member

    I look forward to the Parenting Courses.
     
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  11. Lerner

    Lerner Well-Known Member

    Licensed or credentialed teachers with MEd make a little bit more money in the public school system.
    Most school districts have a slightly higher pay scale for teachers with MEd.
    It can be a good thing when the salary of a teacher is somewhat low in comparison to other professionals and every $ is counted.
    For the new teachers, it may be somewhat an obstacle, when not having experience, and looking for the first job some school districts may hire someone with a lower salary as long as they have the credentials.

    When a student enrolled in a teacher certification/credential program usually there is an option to take an additional 3 to 4 classes and earn an MEd degree with the teacher credential.
    Some teachers first earn the credential, get the teaching job, and later complete the master's degree so they are not denied a job because of the slightly higher pay that comes with an MEd degree.
    This is mostly in public schools.
     
  12. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly Staff Member

    I don't think people in wealthy countries are really their target market, and in other places that sort of name isn't strange sounding.
     
  13. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    They were great. But the Grandparenting Courses were something else! You get to play with the kids all you want - then the parents do all the work! :)
     
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  14. innen_oda

    innen_oda Member

    And with somewhat dire consequences should you choose to unenroll.
     
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  15. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    I'm not really sure. Many folks believe you get to go to some fancy type of grad school afterwards, if you stick it out long enough. I guess I'll take what I can get... :)
     
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  16. Lerner

    Lerner Well-Known Member

    One cal always supplement their teaching education credentuals with EDX or Coursera Master TRack graduate cert from Harward, MIT, etc.

    For example
    MichiganX's Leading Educational Innovation and Improvement MicroMasters® Program

    Saving Schools: Reforming the U.S. Education System
    An overview of the past, present, and future of the United States public K-12 education system.
    [​IMG]
     
  17. Messdiener

    Messdiener Member

    These have always caught my eye. They're likely good for learning new content, but I don't suspect most school districts will bump a learner up the pay scale with only these credentials.
     
  18. Lerner

    Lerner Well-Known Member

    The idea was not as much for the pay, for that the Masters's degree will do.
    But if one needs name recognition, then in addition to TUOP MEd degree (no or low name recognition), to have Harvard, MIT, etc grad cert to expand the knowledge.
    This will not be for pay but for the balance of the portfolio.
     
  19. Dustin

    Dustin Active Member

    I've mentioned this before too, I've found decent programs at schools with names I don't care for, and it makes it hard to imagine putting Argosy or American InterContinential University or similar on my resume for the rest of my life.
     
  20. Rich Douglas

    Rich Douglas Well-Known Member

    The name issue is way overplayed by people who don't have the degrees in question--from any source. Based on my 40 years working and researching this field, that should be WAY down the list of considerations.

    I would be concerned about perceptions of certain schools--fair or not. But a school with a silly name? Hardly. No one cares. Argosy, American InterContinental, Slippery Rock, it really doesn't matter.

    I have a PhD from "Union Institute and University." This is a horrible name. No one cares. My predecessors graduated with diplomas from "The Union for Experimenting Colleges and Universities." No one cared. My other doctorate is from a school Americans can't seem to pronounce, the University of Leicester. No one cares. My three undergraduate degrees are from "The University of the State of New York." Except for it being confused with SUNY Albany, no one cares.

    In my doctoral dissertation at Union, I found statistically significant differences in the acceptability of degrees from schools based on the name. (Not the focus of the study.) The one big difference was when the school seemed to be a state school. (The wholly fictional Columbia State University ranked second on my list behind a real school with "state" in its name.) But that's about it.

    When I start my university, I think I'll name it "State of the Union Institute College."
     
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