UNA's Exec. DBA

Discussion in 'Business and MBA degrees' started by chrisjm18, Jul 26, 2020.

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  1. chrisjm18

    chrisjm18 Well-Known Member

    The University of North Alabama is offering a low-residency Executive Doctor of Business Administration (EDBA). UNA College of Business is AACSB accredited. The program consists of online coursework with one monthly weekend residency (10 each calendar year).

    The program is very expensive ($33k per year x 3 years = $99k).

    https://www.una.edu/business/executive-dba.html
     
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  2. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    For that kind of money, I hope this executive program is guaranteed iron-clad do-able (i.e. provided work is satisfactory to meet all requirements) in three years - no more. In writing. Not even a highly-paid executive should have to gamble an extra $33K or even a possible $66K.
     
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  3. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    There have been articles for years on the glut of PhDs. Many more articles on a glut of MBAs - usually recommending that MBAs should all earn DBAs to escape the glut.
    So far, I haven't unearthed any Glut of DBAs articles. But I have a hunch those are coming...
     
  4. JoshD

    JoshD Active Member

    I think it all depends on what one seems it worth. My MS in Quantitative Management through Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business is $66,000. Highly unlikely anyone on this forum would do the program other than me due to the price. So while it may seem expensive to you, it could seem worth it to someone else.

    That said, I had considered a DBA then realized that there is a severe lack of individuals who understand how to utilize technical skills to make effective data-driven business decisions...hence my path.
     
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  5. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    I'm not criticizing the expense - either of your own finest-quality degree program, Josh, or the Executive DBA offered by University of North Alabama.

    I'm only remarking that there should be little or no wiggle room on the 3-years and $99,000 end cost, provided everyone does their part. I'm only critical if there's a carrot dangled, that MIGHT cost $99,000, $132,000 or $165,000 - which door do you pick etc. If I want to gamble, for those prices I can throw away money and get comped to a decent holiday experience in Vegas. And that will stay in Vegas. Shouldn't be happening at universities. Registrars should not wear eye-shades - or dress and talk like pit-bosses. I'm hoping they aren't, at least in this case - that's all.

    I applaud your ambition, Josh - and wish you every success. My only concern is - and this does not, I'm sure, apply to you personally - what happens if the DBA becomes the new MBA? I sincerely hope it doesn't, and the push for MBAs to further distinguish themselves - as a knee-jerk "solution" to un-or under-employment - doesn't create a credential inflation-driven crush of potentially unsuited DBA seekers, many of whom might re-create the same problems at a higher level.
     
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  6. JoshD

    JoshD Active Member

    I think a DBA can be beneficial but at that point in ones career, their track record of success should supersede their education level. For example, the CEO of Goldman Sachs has a bachelors degree from Hamilton College. No MBA, No DBA but an impeccable track record of leadership and success. His path is abnormal for the large companies but a good example nonetheless.

    I am, however, interested to see the progression of the DBA degree and the implementation of it in organizations and higher education. I have already seen MANY faculty members with a DBA instead of a PhD.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2020
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  7. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    Is that anything like the DI blood-oath I had to swear before Maniac Craniac and Kizmet? Sorry, Josh - I know it was a typo for "path" but I couldn't resist. :)

    Anyway, glad to see a professional (i.e. practice) degree taking the lead for faculty in a practice-driven discipline. A good thing.
     
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  8. JoshD

    JoshD Active Member

    Let’s be honest...would you rather learn from someone who just studied theory or would you rather learn from someone who applied theory to practice and has a track record of success in your field of study? Personally, I like when faculty members have 5-10 years of professional experience outside of academics and can bring that into the classroom.
     
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  9. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    Been there. Had that experience. The best!

    That brings me to another point. My experience is limited to undergrad business courses in my 40s and 50s. I noticed that a couple of instructors - no, there were three - whose lectures I enjoyed most - had a similar background. They had first been engineers, who had migrated into business, having successful experience and earning MBAs - in one case an MBA and a PhD. I theorized that possibly, an innate ability and quickness to see "how things worked" helped them in both engineering and the business world. And showing others "how things worked" made them good business teachers.

    Oh yes. I forgot something else - all three were women. I've known men to be successful in engineering-to-business transition - just never been taught by any.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2020
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  10. Rich Douglas

    Rich Douglas Well-Known Member

    There's a glut of high school graduates, but no one is bemoaning that. This is no different.

    David Hapgood described the issue of creeping credential requirements in his book Diplomaism....in 1971. But...

    Because of greater employee mobility brought about by the seismic shift from defined-benefit to defined-contribution retirement plans beginning in the early 1980s, employers are reluctant to invest in the development of employees who will just take those skills elsewhere. And because of that mobility, employees need credentials recognized universally. Since we don't have a strong qualifications framework in the US, degrees and certifications have to fill the bill.

    This is exacerbated by the availability of degrees for working professionals. In the 1970s you practically had to quit your job to get a degree. Now you can earn just about any career-advancing degree while continuing to work full-time. Not only are the choices of fields far and wide now, so are the levels of degrees AND the delivery methods, too.

    I took my most recent degree 36 years after earning my first. 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1985, 2003, 2015. Trying to keep up.

    But a "glut"? I'm trying to figure out the macroeconomic problem with a more-educated and -skilled workforce.

    I'm much more concerned about the scene in traditional undergraduate education, with students feeling they need to find their careers through college, and graduating with tons of debt. But our domain here is focused primarily on adults earning degrees to advance careers. And in that arena, I have little sympathy, nor concern. It's a jungle out there. Eat them before they eat you.

    (Or not. YMMV.)
     
  11. TEKMAN

    TEKMAN Semper Fi!

    Wow! That is expensive...my 23 acre of land costs me only $70,000.00.
     
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  12. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    And it will last forever.
     
  13. chrisjm18

    chrisjm18 Well-Known Member

    So will the DBA.

    FB_IMG_1595463190650.jpg
     
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  14. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    The problem may be all those PhDs etc. on food stamps - I won't look up the oft-quoted sources, today. Problems stemming from economic drag caused by :

    (1) Necessary public support of those who have high qualifications but have failed in the money-earning world. Nobody should starve. It's inhuman.
    (2) Inability of those highly qualified but unsuccessful people (in career terms) to contribute to the economy. Or pay taxes.

    Having little sympathy or concern for others is not always a good thing, Rich. Not accusing - just sayin'. And if you'd ever looked behind you and seen Shash (bear) or Nashdoitsoh (mountain lion) (thanks to the Navajo people - I'm in love with their beautiful language) - ready to eat you - or their human equivalents - you might - just might - feel differently.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2020
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  15. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    No it won't, Chris. Your DBA will last as long as you do. That's a long time, I hope, but not "forever" is it? And you can't leave it to anyone, either. So - Tekman's land is 'way different.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2020
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  16. chrisjm18

    chrisjm18 Well-Known Member

    You have a valid point. I can't argue with that one.
     
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  17. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    TEKMAN's got it going both ways. He's a savvy investor. Invests in degrees so he'll earn huge money. (I think he already does pretty well.) And he invests in land. So he can likely grow his own food and save even more. :) With that kind of business smarts, he should be awarded an Honorary DBA!
     
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  18. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly

    Lower Manhattan, right? ;)
     
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  19. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    Yup - but not just "Lower." The whole shebang! $73K in beads and trinkets, so I heard. TEKMAN's partner was a Dutchman - guy named Peter Minuit. Funny name for a Dutchman - sounds French, "midnight" but ...
     
  20. TEKMAN

    TEKMAN Semper Fi!

    lol! Luray, Virginia...dirt cheap.:D
     
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