The best MBA degree

Discussion in 'Business and MBA degrees' started by Zaya, Jan 19, 2008.

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  1. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly Staff Member

    Are you a student there? Your review might be interesting.
     
  2. TEKMAN

    TEKMAN Semper Fi!

    Wharton Business School of the University of Pennsylvania does not make the list in the US?

    Top Five US
    - Stanford University
    - Harvard University
    - University of Pennsylvania
    - Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    - Columbia University

    Top Five UK
    - London Business School of University of London
    - Oxford University
    - University of Cambridge
    - Imperial College London
    - University of Warwick
     
  3. Vonnegut

    Vonnegut Well-Known Member

    Um...
     
  4. Vonnegut

    Vonnegut Well-Known Member

    The big surprise absence on that list for me is Kellogg and perhaps arguably Ross/UofM, but certainly Kellogg. Also goes to show, why these lists are not that meaningful.
     
  5. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly Staff Member

    [​IMG]
     
  6. TEKMAN

    TEKMAN Semper Fi!

    I guess it depends who do you ask. But Imperial College London has to be on the TOP FIVE IN THE UK. :D
     
  7. Vonnegut

    Vonnegut Well-Known Member

    Hey… I know a guy who attends there! :D
     
  8. mslggn

    mslggn New Member

  9. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    Six specializations, total cost 2 yrs about $5,400 USD. Not a bad deal, but there are SO many that are more familiar to Western Nations employers. For just over $7k a student could get an AACSB - accredited MBA from U. of Southwestern Georgia. That one is not a bad deal for an Indian Student - especially if he/she intends to seek work in US. Some places here, it's "AACSB or the Highway."

    Good school. I'm assuming the MBA program is good - but for whom is it the "best choice?" There are so many good choices -and so many different reasons. No one choice is the best for everyone. That's the kind of difference that keeps this forum in business.

    Marketing 101. Try not to make unsupported claims. Bad mojo.
     
  10. mslggn

    mslggn New Member

    Thank you for valuable reply, of-course all of have different choice. But UoM not bad choice it is world wide accredited university.
     
  11. nosborne48

    nosborne48 Well-Known Member

    The "best" MBA might be no MBA.
     
    Johann and Maniac Craniac like this.
  12. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    The same could be said in spades, of law degrees. Excluding, of course, the two you hold. :)
     
    Maniac Craniac likes this.
  13. nosborne48

    nosborne48 Well-Known Member

    But you're exactly right. The risk is spending a lot of money for a degree that doesn't pay off and a lot of MBAs and JDs fit that description.
     
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  14. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    I checked Anabin, just out of curiosity and University of Mysore is OK for Germany - H+ means all its degrees are acceptable. I was wondering because I knew about the 'AACSB or the Authobahn' rule for MBAs in Germany - but that rule only applies to American MBAs, not other countries.
     
    Dustin likes this.
  15. Johann766

    Johann766 Active Member

    Anabin H+ means that the school is state-recognized in its homecountry. In that case the degree is accepted as a full degree by the German state.
    In some cases there are hand-written notes regarding certain schools in Anabin in addition to the general H+ or H- grading. For example one note says that UCN degrees are recognised if you studied at the campus in Nicaragua. According to anabin ucn doesn't have state-recognition for its distance Learning programs and because of that these degrees are not officially recognised in Germany.
    AACSB has no meaning for Anabin.
     
    Dustin likes this.
  16. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    Yes, that's what H+ means - and that's what's shown for U. Mysore. There's also an H+- designation, for schools with some degrees that are deemed OK for German use and some that are labeled "deficient." H- means that the whole degree roster is deemed "deficient." And I have to say, Anabin contains very valuable information, but it's just about the clunkiest database I've used in the past 30 years. They should fix it.

    AACSB? No meaning to Anabin? well, it definitely DOES have meaning to German education authorities, so I'll take that with just a small grain of salt. It's common knowledge that in Germany, foreign MBA degrees (only those from US schools) must be from AACSB accredited programs - or they're toast. AACSB of course, is programmatic, not institutional, accreditation. Perhaps that's why Anabin doesn't dwell on it, but .... they know, I'm sure.

    And as for UCN - that, to me, is proof that Anabin is doing its job well.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2022
  17. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    And that job is...protecting Germans from ETD's - Educationally-transmitted deficiencies. :eek:
     
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