Study Law Online

Discussion in 'General Distance Learning Discussions' started by Kizmet, Mar 27, 2018.

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  1. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly

    Hey, once they get that, doesn't that mean their students wouldn't have to sit the Baby Bar anymore?
     
  2. sideman

    sideman Member

    That's right. That's the way it reads now. This would be a game changer.
     
    SteveFoerster likes this.
  3. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

  4. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

  5. sideman

    sideman Member

  6. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

  7. sideman

    sideman Member

    University of New Hampshire will offer the hybrid in intellectual property and University of Dayton your standard J.D. Will be curious to see how this goes as I really want to see this take off. The naysayers in the article say that there'll be a disproportionate amount of dropouts and even those that graduate will not serve the demographic for which it's intended (i.e. rural areas). But haven't they said that about traditional law school too?
     
  8. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

  9. sideman

    sideman Member

    The People's Law School was started by Richard Alderman circa 1990 and was offered on Saturdays for laypersons to learn more about the law. Over the last year or so demand has fallen off for the campus offering so they'll offer prerecorded lectures online. Good program from a "consumer oriented" attorney.
     
  10. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

    I have to say that this is exactly the kind of response I'd hope for from a place that is called the People's Law School. When the on-campus demand dropped they could have simply discontinued the service citing lack of demand. Instead, they increase access to literally everyone by putting it all online. I like that.
     
    sideman likes this.
  11. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

  12. Bruce

    Bruce Moderator Staff Member

    I think I’ve told the story before, but I had a case in district court where the ADA had graduated from a decent law school (Suffolk), and was very competent.

    Later that night, I took my then-girlfriend out to a restaurant across from the courthouse, and the hostess was the ADA who had prosecuted my case that morning. She was roommates with another female ADA, and even sharing expenses, they both had to take on second jobs on nights & weekends.

    Being a lawyer is no longer the Willie Wonka Golden Ticket it used to be.
     
  13. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

  14. sideman

    sideman Member

    You can bet that DL will get a mention at the end, due to the fact that the author is dean of Concord Law School. I can't help but be cynical as to why he's writing this article. Granted, he doesn't mention Concord, but it's clear who it is to the reader, should they look at his bio in the byline. And yes, the tuition of the ABA hybrid law schools are just as high as traditional, but let's give them a chance to figure out the economics and bring the costs down to appeal to the demographic they should be trying to reach. Any movement by the ABA in the direction of distance learning is welcome and traditional law schools embracing this form of learning is welcome. It doesn't do anyone any favors by subtly suggesting that tuition will always remain high (but nod-nod, wink-wink, come to Concord since we're lower). The goal is not to choose what's behind curtain A (traditional law school) or curtain B (distance law school). The goal now is to choose a blend of A and B so anybody that has the ability and aptitude can join the club.
     
  15. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

  16. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

  17. sideman

    sideman Member

    I like their offering of joint degree programs where you can get a JD/LLM in intellectual property law, or JD/MSA (Accountancy-Financial Forensics), et al. It's not enough anymore to get the JD, pass the bar, and then expect to have the red carpet rolled out for you. Correct me if I'm wrong, but seems like a student could take the first two years in the hybrid law program and then finish both degrees in four years (100 credits total). These joint degrees seemingly would then help to differentiate a job candidate.

    https://www.uakron.edu/law/curriculum/joint.dot
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2019
  18. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

  19. nosborne48

    nosborne48 Well-Known Member

    TJLS began life as a California Bar accredited school and could continue to operate that way but not if they intend to continue charging premium level tuition. I wish them well but I don't know whether they will survive.
     
  20. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

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