Marijuana Legalization

Discussion in 'Political Discussions' started by Kizmet, Oct 31, 2016.

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  1. Davewill

    Davewill Member

    Anything to stop locking people up (at great expense), and ruining lives and families over weed. Definitely a case where the "cure" is worse than the disease.
     
  2. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

    But that's the point of this segment of the discussion, isn't it. If the law passes then it's an indication that "most pot smokers" are quietly sitting on their back decks after work enjoying a quick smoke before dinner, not out being fascist vegans. My own personal belief is that it's more closely related to the fact that the baby boomer generation is at or approaching retirement age an they just want to get high while they do whatever (instead of going to work). Personally I don't even drink so it's just a matter of curiosity to me.
     
  3. Bruce

    Bruce Moderator Staff Member

    Touche, Steve.
     
  4. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

  5. Davewill

    Davewill Member

    Appreciate his "concerns" but honestly they have NO SOLUTION. We have very similar concerns with alcohol and tobacco, and we can't solve them either since any solution would involve policing the private actions of adults, which never works. By all means get it federally legal and kill off the last impediments to regulation, licensing and taxes, but don't kid ourselves that people won't continue to get stoned, perhaps to their detriment.
     
  6. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly Staff Member

    Agreed. Fortunately this finally seems to be the direction things are going, in the U.S. and even worldwide.
     
  7. jhp

    jhp Member

    Looked at results of sewage line test from various neighborhoods.

    THC is not high in wealthier neighborhoods. It is primarily cocaine.
     
  8. 03310151

    03310151 New Member


    I assume it would be prescription opiates by a long shot. Interesting idea you have there, got a link to any studies about this?
     
  9. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

    My guess is that it would be Benzodiazepines.
     
  10. 03310151

    03310151 New Member


    Had to Google Benzodiazepines, you're guess is probably close to the truth. I assumed many of those (Xanax) we're considered opiates as well.
     
  11. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

    I haven't had a chance to read up on all these election results but I know it passed in Massachusetts and I think in California too. I'm not familiar enough with the various provisions of the legislation to know what actually happens next but I guess that at some point you're just going to be able to buy marijuana at the store or in a specialty store or something like that. Like all the other election results, it remains to be seen whether it's a good thing or not.
     
  12. 03310151

    03310151 New Member

    I can tell you that in my state for the reasonable people the jury is still out. It's not the panacea the pro-weed people say it is, and it's not the devils plant the anti-weed people say it is. The truth lay somewhere in between. It will be a bit different for each state, just ignore the loudmouths on the fringes OF BOTH SIDES, and wait. The hardest part is the wait, things take time.
     
  13. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

    I think you're right, it will take time for everything to sift out. On a certain level it has nothing to do with me but I do have thoughts about the increase in drivers under the influence and stuff like that.
     
  14. 03310151

    03310151 New Member



    Yeah, I'm with you. I don't smoke it and don't like it. But I voted to legalize here in Washington. I think we've had a few crashes that the driver was under the influence of THC, not nearly as many as we do from texting or driving drunk.
     
  15. heirophant

    heirophant Well-Known Member

    Yeah, it passed easily here in California.

    Here in California they are supposed to overhaul the existing medical marijuana regulatory office and put it in charge of licensing marijuana growers and retail sales establishments, including things like marijuana liquor stores and on-site consumption places (bars/dope dens). Given the lightening-fast speed that bureaucracy moves around here, I expect that it will be many months before that's up and running. The immediate impact will be the law's making possessing and smoking dope in your own home legal.

    I'm guessing that some of the existing e-cigarette "vape shops" will mutate into marijuana retailers. The millenial age crowd that patronize them look like stoners in potentia.

    The new legislation that just passed gives cities and counties the option of opting out. So there's a stampede of local upscale (and not so upscale) communities passing city ordinances outlawing marijuana businesses inside their boundaries. Apparently they fear that they will attract low-lifes and lower the local tone. (Important if you just paid more than a million for your house.) San Jose just outlawed marijuana businesses inside its city limits. But the San Jose map is filled with little unincorporated pockets and these already host the city's porn-shops, massage parlors and a lot of its prostitution and dope dealing. So I expect that's where the marijuana businesses will end up too.
     
  16. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly Staff Member

    Last night California, Maine, Massachusetts, and Nevada legalized it outright. Arizona's legalization initiative was narrowly defeated.

    Arkansas, Florida, Montana, and North Dakota approved medicinal marijuana, which we now see from other states is basically a general decriminalization maneuver, so that's progress in all those places as well.
     
  17. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

  18. Neuhaus

    Neuhaus Well-Known Member

    If Jeff Sessions is confirmed as AG I imagine it will be more of an uphill battle. He is adamantly opposed to legalization (recreational or medicinal). So DOJ disruption of dispensaries and farms might increase.

    For the average user on the street, however, it would be unlikely to see much activity. The FBI isn't going to start up foot patrols looking for kids smoking weed.

    I think that legalization is on its way. But it may be delayed by a few more years with such a hardliner in the AG chair.
     
  19. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly Staff Member

    Moreover, those running state governments in states where a lot of people really loathe Trump may be emboldened to resist federal intrusion more forcefully than they would otherwise.
     
  20. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

    So some of you might be able to help me with this. My understanding is that Republicans/conservatives want smaller government and more stuff decided at the state level. Then why would the Republicans then want to centralize this issue? Why not ust let the states decide?
     

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