If a course is homologated, is it considered official in Spain or still propio?

Discussion in 'Business and MBA degrees' started by TeacherBelgium, Nov 8, 2020.

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  1. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    Even if workable - would such "doctorates" be worth much? Sad, to think of even the highest academic achievement becoming debased. :( Another "All-you-can-eat Cheap Credits Buffet" scenario...

    If there isn't a law -- there should be.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2020
  2. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

  3. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    If someone truly wants an easy-peasy "doctorate" from a Spanish-speaking (or bilingual) school, there are plenty of legal private universities in places like Panama. They vary from quite good to degree mills of the worst order. These schools often operate under a license which makes their degrees legal - but many are not their country's equivalent of "accredited." Hence, there is little or no academic oversight and the degrees of such licensed schools are of less-than-mainstream standing. Accordingly, US recognition of these is often a crapshoot at best. Some are cheap, some are easy, some are both -- or neither.

    There are also recognized schools like Universidad Central de Nicaragua. Degrees here are known to have rigor, but are still inexpensive. Nowadays, they have far too many dual and triple awards with other schools, for my taste. I think their own home-grown degrees are the best they offer. Some time ago, I've known this school's own degrees to get good reception in US. Haven't heard anything new either way for a long time. Don't really know what's happening in that regard today.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2020
  4. TeacherBelgium

    TeacherBelgium Active Member

    My educated guess is that it's not illegal if they mention that it's propio.
    It would just not be recognized by the government I presume.
     
  5. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    No. To offer one would contravene the Law of University Reform Act (1983). I don't think any legit school is brave or foolhardy enough to try that. And any non- legit school:

    (1) You don't want a degree from -- do you?
    (2) Would probably get shut down promptly for trying. Someone would go to the old "juzgado" for sure.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2020
  6. TeacherBelgium

    TeacherBelgium Active Member

    But there is this dba programme from a spanish school that is propio and is convalidated by the miguel de cervantes university so I think there must be a loophole they use.
     
  7. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    From here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miguel_de_Cervantes_European_University I gather that Miguel de Cervantes (a Private University) does not, itself, award Doctorates. What they are doing, convalidating "doctorates" of a private school I do not know. In fact, I see no valid reason the private school should be allowed to award any doctorate, convalidation by any other school notwithstanding.

    A propio comes from a school that is legitimately allowed to award certain other degrees. I'm not sure this is the case here. Has this private school any real degree-granting permission of its own? Call it conjecture, if you will, but I think this convalidation may be simply for profit.

    Loophole? I'm guessing convalidating others' degrees is a tad less risky than actually awarding them. But yeah - now I remember - all those Fazley College grads got real U. Wales diplomas... Uni. of Wales got away with that for years, until the wheels fell off. We'll see what happens, here.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2020
  8. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    Oh - and a look at the Miguel de Cervantes U. site again confirms - no Doctorates of their own. They offer some propios - but again, no doctorates among them, either.
    https://www.uemc.es/

    I still fail to see why this University would risk its reputation by validation of doctorates it does not itself award, for private schools with degree-granting authority that is murky at best, likely insufficient for what is being awarded, or, at worst, possibly nonexistent.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2020

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