Have the MBA degree but have never worked a job? What should I do? Thanks

Discussion in 'Business and MBA degrees' started by dannyasingh, Nov 12, 2015.

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  1. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

    Hmmm. I don't know if that's him or not but it all makes me wonder, who are you, cathgrl?
     
  2. rook901

    rook901 New Member

  3. Bruce

    Bruce Moderator Staff Member

    This thread reminds me of the DegreeInfo of years past, when mill shills and other sketchy contributors were ripped to shreds with facts and logic.

    It almost brings a tear to my eye. :wink:
     
  4. FTFaculty

    FTFaculty Well-Known Member

    If he wants a job with the FBI, he'd be a lot better off getting a degree in accounting or CS than CJ. If he's not willing to move anywhere in the country, then he'd be better off taking his CJ degree and getting into local law enforcement or corrections.
     
  5. Neuhaus

    Neuhaus Well-Known Member

    So, we have a classmate who is a secret service agent (not presidential detail). We urged this particular individual to give our Secret Service acquaintance a call just to get some federal law enforcement pointers, in general.

    He didn't want to.

    Did you ever meet one of those people who doesn't do anything to further their goals, acts like they are simply refusing to compromise their goals and ends up bitter doing something they don't want to do? Yeah, I think that's this guy.

    The "easy" thing for him to do is what he is currently doing. He tends bar and buys FBI swag off of eBay. If someone were to call me tomorrow and tell me he had been arrested for impersonating an FBI agent I would be incredibly disappointed and not at all surprised.

    In Pennsylvania it is fairly easy to get into the police academy. Most municipalities don't even have their own. Outside of the cities it is a program, often housed at a community college, that lasts 6 months full-time (and carries a few credits with it). He could absolutely have received his police officer certification. One of the problems, I suspect, is that there is little reason for him to actually do that. Many local municipalities only hire part-time officers and the going rate is somewhere around $10/hr (the University of Scranton will pay you a whopping 50 cents more per hour than a security guard if you are a certified police officer). So, I imagine he makes more tending bar.

    In any case, I mainly meant to illustrate the difference between a "dream" and a "goal." His dream is to be an FBI agent. He deliberately avoids any action which might even indirectly move him toward that dream. Were becoming an FBI agent a goal, then he would likely go out and study accounting, maybe get some other investigative experience, get a security clearance, learn a language, or generally just do something that might entice the FBI to hire him.
     
  6. FTFaculty

    FTFaculty Well-Known Member

    I know a fellow who was an FBI agent for two decades. What got him in was a degree in accounting, a graduate degree in business, a CPA, experience with computer languages, experience in private security, teaching at a small college and a can-do, willing-to-move, willing-to-learn-and-do-what-it-takes attitude. He ended up having a great and exciting career. But people like your friend are exactly the types whom the FBI wants nothing to do with, because even if he got in, he'd sooner-or-later find himself doing some task that he perhaps thought beneath him or a drudgery, possibly get bitter because no one understands his "genius", and quite possibly end up being compromised, like this bitter guy: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Hanssen
     
  7. Neuhaus

    Neuhaus Well-Known Member

    Well, just to clarify, he's a former classmate. I don't get together with this guy for a beer with any regularity. But, I agree that the FBI likely wants nothing to do with him. I can tell you that guys with similar attitudes who join the military often flounder as well. Usually they show up ready to sign up for SEAL training and then, three years later, they face getting booted for having failed so many PFAs. They want the glory without the hard work it takes to get there (and the responsibility that comes with it).

    I recall reading that Hanssen has a photographic memory and was able to screw off in class (when he was in dental school) and recall entire lectures verbatim. I'm glad they caught him. But I'm kind of even more glad that the FBI ended up with him rather than some unsuspecting dental patient.
     
  8. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    No proof, but I thought so as well, after spending a while Googling "dannyasingh." I learned that the author who uses the handle "dannyasingh" advocated attending Community College and taking as many courses as possible to minimize time and cost for a degree. Not bad general advice, but hardly original.

    Interestingly, someone with the exact same handle and (I think) similarities in writing style posted that he'd encountered a couple of academic problems. One involved his ID being stolen and another dealt with his wrongly being listed on some site as a professor at a school he attended - and being accused by the administration of listing himself to gain access to answers in the teaching materials...

    WORLD Law Direct Forums - Search Results

    I think (and hope) that the "Danny" who asked these questions, may be doing so in the hope of writing about the situations, using any useful answers to profit as an author. I have no proof it's the same guy, and we'll probably never know...

    J.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 20, 2015
  9. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    Anyway, I'll let this go, now. After all, if spinning yarns in Internet forums - including this forum - were a punishable offence, they'd be even darker and lonelier places than they are.
    BTW, did I ever mention my Post-Doc at the Sorbonne? :smile:

    Prof. Dr. Sir Johann
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 20, 2015
  10. FTFaculty

    FTFaculty Well-Known Member

    I know someone who knew RH personally and worked alongside him for an extended period. According to this friend, Hanssen might have been brilliant (MBA at Northwestern establishes that), but was truly a creep, and very bitter than no one recognized him for the genius he thought he was.
     
  11. Neuhaus

    Neuhaus Well-Known Member

    I served with a guy who always comes to mind when I read about the creepy stuff RH did, said etc. it sounds like they have very similar mannerisms. This guy claimed to have a PhD (yet was enlisted in the Navy and seemed to have a great bit of difficulty breaking past E4). The big difference was that he had two or three acolytes who used to fawn over his "brilliance."

    Obviously not a perfect comparison. RH channeled his efforts into things like dental school (though he dropped out), that MBA from Northwestern, working for the Chicago PD and the FBI. This guy (most likely) lied about his degrees and languished in the personnel office of the Navy (he eventually got busted because it was discovered that he had made himself nearly a dozen military IDs after business hours with strange names and varying ranks).

    Still, the guy was odd. And I can only imagine that I'd RH was bothered by the lack of recognition of his brilliance during his career, he must be experiencing hell being locked away in Florence.
     
  12. major56

    major56 Active Member

    While in the Marine Corps; the FBI was a BIG recruiter of MC company grade officers, e.g., 1st Lieutenants (O-2) and Captains (O-3) separating (EAS) after completing their initial ACTIVE DUTY (AD) /TERM OF SERVICE (TOS) obligation. The recruiting commonality was most likely, in part, due to the fact that the FBI Academy is located on the Marine Corps Base (MCB) at Quantico, VA—in close proximity to The Basic School.
     
  13. davefranco

    davefranco New Member

    Let your network speak for you. Nothing you could say about yourself is stronger than a recommendation from someone who knows you and can recommend you. The ideal scenario is for you to use your network to find someone within the organization and let that person make the first pitch for you.
     

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