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Discussion in 'General Distance Learning Discussions' started by TCord1964, Oct 8, 2005.

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  1. Mac Juli

    Mac Juli Well-Known Member

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  2. Mac Juli

    Mac Juli Well-Known Member

    Was successful! - Excellent course as far as I can tell. It's much more demanding than the pseudo-Master Propio from Spain!!
     
  3. Dustin

    Dustin Well-Known Member

    Cool! The two subjects I have struggled with the most have been electronics (not computers but the hardware half of the equation) and math. I actually bought a kid's "inventor kit" to teach basic electronics by having you do things like wire up an LED to a small battery, couldn't make heads or tails of it. Probably spent 8 hours trying to get through experiment 1, before handing it to a friend of mine who did the whole kit in a weekend. Ah well. I might check this out.
     
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  4. Mac Juli

    Mac Juli Well-Known Member

    I had the dubious honour of trashing more electronic equipment during my Physikalisches Praktikum I & II at the University of Hamburg than the whole rest of the course together, having - among other incidents - blown up a galvanometer that even had survived the Bombing of Hamburg in the 40s, giving myself a shock of 600 volts arm-to-arm. As soon as the theory met the practice, I was a hopeless case. - I am glad that THIS course has no high-voltage elements...
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2023
  5. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    I'd have probably had the same experience, when I was a kid or as a young adult. But when I was in my early 60s, I built a couple of radios from kits, no problem ... strange. I still have one of them - an FM-only radio. Still works. Batteries.

    My son - just the opposite. When he was about 12, I bought him one of those 200-in-one kits, because I knew he wanted one. I think he built 3 or 4 properly-working models Christmas Day, without even opening the instruction book! I'm sure he eventually built all 200. Around that time I got a simple short-wave radio kit, same no-solder type for myself and he built it for me in about 15 minutes. Back then, I'm certain I'd never have finished it.

    Today, he's 53 - a long-term high-school teacher, robotics and everything "computery," among other tech. subjects. He heads up the school's Robotics Club -- and they've done pretty well in competition. He's also a better guitar player than his Old Man! :)
     
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  6. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly Staff Member

    Neat! Vex, or a different one?
     
  7. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    I believe different, Steve. Not sure of system makers, here. I can ask and get back to you. I do know there are Raspberry Pi's involved in control and a lot of Arduinos (Arduini?) and similar do much of the heavy lifting.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2023
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  8. Rachel83az

    Rachel83az Well-Known Member

    As a grown-up person, I want one. I don't think they still make them, though. At least, not in that form. I used to have one (and one of those actually dangerous chemistry kits from the late 70s, IIRC) when I was a kid, but they were from the thrift store. I've literally never seen one new in the store.

    I'm sorry, but https://www.amazon.com/Snap-Circuits-SC-300-Electronics-Exploration/dp/B0000683A4/ is nowhere near as fun as https://www.amazon.com/Maxitronix-200-in-One-Electronic-Project-Lab/dp/B0002AHR04/ Maybe I'm just old.
     
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  9. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    Nah - it's nothing to do with age, Rachel. I think maybe you're just more intelligent than a lot of other folks. :)

    I had a "dangerous" chemistry set when I was about 10 (1953). I blew the lid off a garbage can with gunpowder, made firecrackers with various- coloured flames etc. I still remember: strontium - red flame, sodium - yellow, boron - green etc. By accident, I nearly gassed myself and a friend, with overzealous making of sulfur dioxide. Yeah, that thing was an education in a box. Never a dull moment. :)

    Looking at the sets I agree. One of my kit radios was a Snap Circuits. Dull to build, - but dependable. It still works 15 years later, so... The Maxitronix set looks a lot like the one I gave my son in 1982 except the front control panel is better-looking. I bought it in radio Shack. They were better, then. And right - today, you find them in the Thrift Stores.
     
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  10. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly Staff Member

  11. Rachel83az

    Rachel83az Well-Known Member

    Meanwhile, I've gone down a rabbit hole to see if I could find the chemistry set I remember. I think it was Chemcraft or Skillcraft, because I remember the square plastic bottles. But mine had blue lids, not red. And it had a rack that I'm pretty sure was blue, not yellow. And I remember it having at least 15-20 chemicals, where most of the ones I'm seeing online only seem to have 8-10. Something like figure 6 on this page https://www.quekett.org/resources/recommended-books/dozen/favourite-delly except newer and I don't remember having any scales. Which may be why I never tinkered with the set that much.
     
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  12. Mac Juli

    Mac Juli Well-Known Member

  13. Rachel83az

    Rachel83az Well-Known Member

  14. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    Reward system - carrot or lump of sugar after every completed assignment. :)
     
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  15. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    Different, Steve. REV is their system. My son said that they have some VEX hardware and it's very good indeed. But REV is less expensive for competition (which is important - this is a school budget - public money) and it's a very accessible platform.

    Apparently, VEX is also somewhat like Apple or Microsoft. If you're in a VEX competition your robot CANNOT have ANYTHING that isn't VEX. So -- REV for flexibility and cost reasons. It works. Students learn, students have fun. :)
     
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  16. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    Back in the 1950s, when I had my "dangerous" chemistry set, you could supplement it, or put your own together, quite cheaply. There was a Dispensing Chemist downtown. Anything a drugstore sold, prescriptions and a wall filled with shelves of glass jars full of chemicals. Most sold by the ounce.

    You could go pretty well as dangerous as you liked - within reason. I was a pretty curious kid and somewhere, I read up on narcotics when I was 11, but I knew enough not to go in and ask for meperidine hydrochloride or something like that, because I'd have been in REAL trouble. Common low-level explosive components, like iron filings, charcoal, Potassium nitrate etc. No problem. Prices were generally 10 cents to maybe 25-35 cents an ounce. You could also by glassware - beakers, test tubes etc.

    Almost like frontier days, I guess. That store disappeared in the early 60s.
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2023

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