ASIC in The CHEA International Quality Group (CIQG)

Discussion in 'Accreditation Discussions (RA, DETC, state approva' started by LearningAddict, Jul 28, 2019.

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  1. Rich Douglas

    Rich Douglas Well-Known Member

    ASIC accreditation does not confer the right to award British degrees. That comes from either a Royal Charter or an Act of Parliament.

    I bring this up because I'm disappointed to see Ubiquity University not only listing accreditation by ASIC, but making claims that seem to go far beyond ASIC's powers. (Equating ASIC accreditation with real and recognized institutional accreditation, which it most certainly is not, and implying recognition in the British system.) https://www.ubiquityuniversity.org/accreditation/

    On another note: A university claiming to award degrees based on a territorial authorization like, say, from Turks and Caicos Islands, would NOT be issuing degrees from the UK. Instead, it would be comparable to a state-authorized, yet unaccredited, school awarding degrees from the US. Legal, but not recognized. Just thought I'd toss that in.
     
    Johann likes this.
  2. Johann766

    Johann766 Member

    I still don´t really understand the relation between ASIC and UK state-recognized degrees.

    If a school in the UK has ASIC accreditation this doesn´t automatically mean that the degrees it awards are state-recognized?!
    When what´s the difference between ASIC accreditation in the UK compared to any other country?
    What would be any different if the school is somethere else in the world, and it does have ASIC accreditation but does not have state-recognition?
     
  3. Rich Douglas

    Rich Douglas Well-Known Member

    Think of ASIC as a quality assurance organization. (I'm not commenting on its efficacy, just it's nature.) It's an attempt to get a handle on foreign (non-UK) schools. That's it. (Well, not exactly, since they have a say on education-related visas.)

    This is NOT the same as an organization tasked with recognizing degree-granting institutions. In the UK, that falls to things like royal charters and (more typically recently), Acts of Parliament. The QAA does the leg work on this.

    I don't know if a degree from a university recognized in the Turks and Caicos would be evaluated by a foreign credential service as being comparable to one awarded by a regionally accredited school in the US. But I would not make such an assumption; I'll wait for the proof.
     

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