anyone is familiar with this school

Discussion in 'Business and MBA degrees' started by DLfan, Feb 1, 2020.

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  1. tadj

    tadj Active Member

    I've provided an example of how it looks at a particular university. You just didn't access the link.
     
  2. tadj

    tadj Active Member

    There is nothing fake about a Polish and Austrian-accredited credential.
     
  3. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

    This is a credential that is peculiar to Poland. In that context it is understandable and makes sense. Outside of that context it doesn't fit and there is a huge likelihood that it will be misunderstood. Presenting this credential as a doctoral degree in the US would seem to be misleading, at best. I think the thing to do is have it assessed by the appropriate service and then you refer to it in the manner that they indicate is most accurate within our system. This does not seem complicated to me and I'm unsure why it has become so.
     
  4. tadj

    tadj Active Member

    There is a huge likelihood that the DBA will be misunderstood in the same way as the Czech-Slovak PhDr that was discussed earlier. No disagreement here, Kizmet.

    Rich apparently had a problem with my suggestion that it is okay to provide a disclaimer when you know that a credential won't get a pass abroad. He suggested that it would be fakery to place such a a disclaimer next to a qualification on a resume (example: "Post-Diploma", or "Slovak Small Doctorate"). I was more open to the idea, although a credential evaluation would always be the most advised option. Then again, I would support a simillar disclaimer with non-accredited credentials (For example, a degree from a non-accredited, but state-licensed U.S. institution). I am guessing that Rich would disagree with me on that issue.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2020
  5. Steve Levicoff

    Steve Levicoff Well-Known Member

    Please forgive Rich, tadj. Remember, he has two doctorate degrees, one of which is RA from the U.S. and the other being European. Accordingly, he thinks that his shit doesn't stink. :rolleyes:
     
  6. tadj

    tadj Active Member

  7. Stanislav

    Stanislav Well-Known Member

    Yeah, these rules could be really nitpicky. My uncle has a D. Sc. defended in Shevchenko Kyiv National University, and it was readily accepted in Poland as "doctor habilitowany" (higher doctorate). The same degree received after 1991 would have to go through a difficult nostrification process, where they would scrutinize the thesis. This is because before 1991, degrees came from Soviet Union - and Poland had a formal treaty with USSR for mutual recognition of scientific titles. The treaty is actually renewed by default and still in force - but now cover only USSR's successor, Russia.
     
  8. Stanislav

    Stanislav Well-Known Member

    Dude, in Poland's case, this is not about the form of recognition. It's about contents. The program that didn't cover research method and did not require original research is NOT a DBA. There's a crucial difference between Chech titles and Polish ones. In Poland, Post-Diploma Studies is a local credential, but the particular name "Doctor of Business Administration" is not. It's an American export; offering this program, schools implicitly say that the program is comparable to the Western programs. Same with MBAs. Why do the schools even offer the program under this title? Mostly it's about milking the businessmen who already did MBAs out of a few more zloty; but the conceit is that this is training on the "DBA" level. And it's not. This is degree mill stuff.
     
  9. Stanislav

    Stanislav Well-Known Member

    We're both wrong. It's 'Czechia'; this is the official Anglicized short name they adopted I believe last year.
     
  10. Stanislav

    Stanislav Well-Known Member

    It's an outdated credential that falls between a Masters and a real doctorate. The article linked here explains how even though the country tried to align its qualifications framework with EU, these "little doctorates" survived because most of the politicians grabbed themselves one of these, and are quite fond of them.
     
  11. Stanislav

    Stanislav Well-Known Member

    For this discussion, the important part is that the "DBA" in question comes from a school that can't award doctorates.
    I completely understand; situation in Ukraine is much the same. Except private are schools still seen as inferior to public ones, pretty much universally. The only private HEI with solid national reputation is Ukrainian Catholic University. Interestingly, it does offer an MBA through "Lviv Business School", and it is also not an official degree - it's a post-diploma program, just like in Poland. The program is offered in Executive format, appears to be rigorous, and costs over $20K (very expensive for Ukrainian school). LBS also has a couple MSc programs, which ARE government-licensed - and several times cheaper. Looks like this is a luxury item as much as an education program. UCU was discussed here, for its Master in Ecumenical Studies program - English version of which is by distance, for $2k a year. Quite a gap in fees.
     
  12. tadj

    tadj Active Member

    You're saying that a DBA program that has specifically been accredited by AQ Austria (Agency for Quality Assurance and Accreditation Austria) is "degree mill stuff." While you're certainly entitled to your opinion, I will rely on the reputable accrediting agency;
    https://enqa.eu/index.php/enqa-agencies/members/full-members/
    https://www.aq.ac.at/de/ueber-uns/dokumente-ueber-uns/Taetigkeitsbericht_2018_Web.pdf?m=1559033882&
     
  13. tadj

    tadj Active Member

    Yes, the non-public HEIs (higher education institutions) are definitely seen as inferior to public institutions in Poland. However, the non-public HEIs that have achieved the "university-type" status are increasingly getting the good reputation that they deserve. They can award doctorates and outrank some prominent Polish public institutions. One of the non-public universities has recently been given the right to train medical doctors, which is a totally new development.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2020
  14. Stanislav

    Stanislav Well-Known Member

    A school that offers "Doctor of Business Administration" program that we both agree (but for different reasons) is NOT a doctorate, in form or substance? Yes, this is what mills do. It is NOT about accreditation.
    On a more practical level - this diploma will be useless in US anywhere credential evaluation is required. This can only get a positive evaluation by mistake, or from a disreputable agency.
     
  15. Stanislav

    Stanislav Well-Known Member

    Difference here. In Ukraine, "university-type" status is not much of a distinction; vast majority of recognized schools (public and private) grabbed it. There might be some private schools with decent reputation; I only know of the UCU in Lviv. Good for Poland if it was able to grow a more robust private sector.
    P. S. Private med schools exist in Ukraine. They are all recognized, but their reputation is mostly poor.
     
    tadj likes this.
  16. Rich Douglas

    Rich Douglas Well-Known Member

    Quite right.
     
  17. Rich Douglas

    Rich Douglas Well-Known Member

    This from someone who is noted for putting others down on the basis of his own Union degree because it comes from a regionally accredited school. I love how that somehow becomes a a deficit in others.

    The ad hominem: a place lazy people go who want to argue, but have nothing substantive to say.

    As for "tadj," he's just arguing to argue at this point.
     
  18. tadj

    tadj Active Member

    Rich,

    Typically, I just accept the accreditation verdicts of solid accreditation agencies such as; AQ Austria. I don't argue with their decisions ovcr the accreditation of a given program. Collegium Humanum is no exception. If I didn't like aspects of a program, I would still attempt to avoid any accusations until accreditation has been withdrawn from a school, or program. I simply believe that European government-backed accreditation agencies are in a better position to evaluate a given program than myself. I don't treat Collegium Humanum in any special way.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2020
  19. Steve Levicoff

    Steve Levicoff Well-Known Member

    No, Rich, ad hominem is seeing an insult when there is none. It's also having a persecution complex. I didn't put your degrees down at all; in fact, I view both of them as legit. I merely observed that you think your shit doesn't stink. That is based on your personality, not your degrees. So lighten up, honey. :D
     
  20. Stanislav

    Stanislav Well-Known Member

    ...not no be confused with "Chechnya". Which is a polity in North Caucasus in Russia, site of secessionist uprisings (First and Second Chechen Wars, 1994-1996 and 1999-2009). The family of the Boston Marathon bombers (Tsarnaev brothers) was from Chechnya. Other than virtually identical names, Czechia and Chechnya have nothing in common.
     

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