Affordable DL - Ph.D/DBA/Ed.D - Europe or Asia

Discussion in 'Business and MBA degrees' started by Tobe, Nov 16, 2019.

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  1. Tobe

    Tobe New Member

  2. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

  3. Tobe

    Tobe New Member

  4. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

    Mmmm. And so my next question is . . . do you speak any relevant languages (European or Asian)? Next I would want to know, what do you consider to be "affordable?" Do you have a maximum cost per year?
     
  5. Tobe

    Tobe New Member

    HAhahaha ...this is a typical American question!! Yes, I am European ... and I also talk as most Europeans two more languages see: https://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/2014/sep/26/europeans-multiple-languages-uk-ireland
    ... but also being aware of the DL landscape English is the main language ..and commonly used in many countries ;)
    As per budget affordable for me would be something in the range of 8000-10000 USD.

    I guess all this questions are based on the idea to help me with my questions and not sabotage the thread I have open ;) I understand that this forum is predominately for Americans (from your questions) or at least those that claim that, but do you think we could include also the rest of us ...that we are not?
     
  6. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

    I would love to include you and will try to do that by asking a few more questions. You see, I am aware that this board is predominantly American. I am aware that many Europeans speak more than one language and that its not so uncommon to find a person who might speak thre or four. Sadly, I am also aware that most Americans do not. Most Americans speak one language. English. And many of them don't speak even that one language particularly well. I think we could say that this is a good example of Americentrism. In any case, that's why we don't talk too much about European distance learning degree programs. The language of instruction is commonly non-English and so people lose interest quite quickly. I'd love to have a list of programs from European countries - both English-speaking and non-English speaking. I'll start

    https://www.uni-sofia.bg/index.php/eng/students/additional_opportunities_for_qualification_and_education/master_s_and_doctoral_studies_in_philosophy_taught_in_english_and_post_doctoral_fellows_in_philosophy_at_sofia_university
     
  7. Pappas

    Pappas Member

  8. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

  9. Steve Levicoff

    Steve Levicoff Well-Known Member

    No, I have no interest in being a doctor doctor, but thanks anyway.

    I'm familiar with the Cyprus program, but wouldn't like it for myself - it has no significant component in musical theatre and focuses too heavily on ancient Greek and Roman theatre - both of which would bore the crap out of me. Generally, when it comes to European programs I recommend Rose Bruford College of Theatre and Performance in London. Well established and solid rep, although its online studies are primarily at the bachelor's level.
     
  10. Pappas

    Pappas Member

  11. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

  12. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly

    Something like 20% of U.S. Americans also speak Spanish, so I'm not sure it's fair to say "most" Americans are monolingual. Either way, I don't agree that not learning a foreign language is necessarily an example of an U.S.-centric attitude, since learning a language requires a considerable investment of time, and we have far less incentive to do so when our mother tongue is the international language.
     
  13. Pappas

    Pappas Member

    You don't agree but somehow your statement actually justifies what Kizmet stated.... :D;)
    But again ...in the Pax Americana era this is definitely pass-able... :D:D

    I think (correct me if I am wrong) your knowledge of the educational system in E. Europe would definitely add to the thread...any recommendation for DL Doctorate from E. Europe?
     
  14. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

    Well I am one of those only- English people and I don’t feel at all bad about it and so in that regard I agree with you. Despite that I feel the need to say that in my mind, “most” means >50%. Whatever.
     
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  15. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly

    My statement that many Americans are multilingual doesn't conflict with my statement that the prominent role of English explains why so many Americans whose first language is English don't bother to pick up another.

    But Kizmet was right to imply that I was being quibblesome, and if one equates "most" with "majority" then she's right.

    No, Eastern Europe isn't an area of expertise for me.

    I suppose I can say that umpteen years ago the University of Tartu said they didn't charge fees to doctoral students even when they were foreigners who live abroad, but that's in Estonia, which is Northern Europe, not Eastern Europe. In fact I was at a conference last week where the Estonia's ambassador to the U.S. was remarking on how he dislikes it when people refer to Estonia as pro-Western, because "Estonia is not a pro-Western country, it is a Western country." It's in here somewhere:

     
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  16. Pappas

    Pappas Member

    If that statement is true then Estonia (UofT) is indeed the representative of Europe ... Education should be FREE!!!
     
  17. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly

    At the risk of treading old ground, what you're really saying is that you believe someone else should pay for it other than the recipient. But I suppose that doesn't sound as progressive.
     
  18. Stanislav

    Stanislav Well-Known Member

    Or education should be treated as a public good.
    It's a perspective that exists for ages, and not just in communist China. You can argue in favor of different models, I s'ppose, but treating "free college" as this radical position is intellectually dishonest.

    Example: I did not pay for any of my non-DL studies; in other words, not for any of the three degrees I actually completed. It's a thing.
     
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  19. Stanislav

    Stanislav Well-Known Member

    Poland is in Eastern Europe, and few wrinkles aside it is also decidedly Western. Estonia, as a country formerly occupied by the Soviet Union, has a lot in common with Eastern Europe - although it is one of the top countries in terms of successful transition. It's one of the nine former Warsaw Bloc countries (they'd argue differently; legally Estonia is not a successor of Estonian SSR) that count as World Bank "high income". Don't quote me, but I think they'd be at or near the top of that list by GDP per capita.

    In fact, I would argue all of Eastern Europe is part of the West. Except Belarus and Russia (if that's still Europe), and I hope Belarus manages to free itself somehow. Some are in the worse shape economically and mentally, but the West is our home.
     
  20. Pappas

    Pappas Member

    Well, yes education is one of the things that is public good and in many of the EU countries this is the norm.
    Of course this is not applicable to DL ;)
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2019

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