UNL Vs UMass Lowell MBA

Discussion in 'Business and MBA degrees' started by nyfaisal, Jan 26, 2011.

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  1. AUTiger00

    AUTiger00 New Member

    I do consider Indiana/Kelley an elite program, especially if you're interested in marketing as that is what Kelley is most known for, and so I stand corrected. There is ONE elite MBA program offered via distance that you can take longer than three years to complete. Thanks for making me look stupid, Mark.
     
  2. mark74

    mark74 New Member

    Ha, ha. Sorry Tiger! I actually think it is a possibility for the OP though.
     
  3. AUTiger00

    AUTiger00 New Member

    I agree. Great reputation.
     
  4. AUTiger00

    AUTiger00 New Member

    Not to go too far off topic, but I've always wondered how one would list a program like the CQEMBA or similar programs offered between two universities. I think I would list it as:

    Cornell University/Queens University
    Master of Business Administration (Executive Program)

    Or something like that. If you're going to consider the Cornell/Queens program, you might as well consider the Brown/IE EMBA as well. IE is one of the top b-schools in Europe, and while Brown doesn't have a business school, it is any Ivy and I doubt they would put their name on anything that wasn't top notch.. Also, it's a relative steal compared to the CQEMBA at the low low price of only $95,000. Beyond that, you have two years to enroll after being admitted, which would give the OP time to save some money, essentially giving him four years to complete the program.
     
  5. mark74

    mark74 New Member

  6. major56

    major56 Active Member

    Regarding the Cornell /Queens EMBA, I would consider the $106K in fees and then essentially divide that amount by two in that within the program’s 16-month duration two separate MBAs are awarded … one from two top-shelf B-Schools – Cornell (Johnson) and one from the Queens University School of Business & Management. In somewhat contrast, isn’t the IE Brown EMBA more of a synergy between Brown, who you’ve mentioned has no school of business, and a prominent business school … in this case IE Business School? This collaboration between Brown and IE allows Brown to compellingly enter an additional academic education market in which Brown wasn’t participating and possessed no business school expertise or track record. And rather than a new venture startup process with its (Brown) own untried Business School … partner with an existing top global business school such as IE (?). I wonder who initially approached whom?
     
  7. AUTiger00

    AUTiger00 New Member

    You're killing me here. I'm just going to say NYU Stern sucks to save face. Also, Stern isn't available via distance so it's disqualified from this conversation.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 28, 2011
  8. AUTiger00

    AUTiger00 New Member

    I see your point but I'll be honest, I don't see the benefit of having two MBA degrees, regardless of how good the institutions granting them are. It seems like a bit of overkill (don't get me wrong, if I did the program I'd still frame both of them).
     
  9. mark74

    mark74 New Member

    I agree with this. I am pretty sure the law of marginal utility applies to MBAs. I think a second MBA or jointly issued MBA would raise more questions than it would add value, at least to the degree that it would not justify the cost. I would much prefer to just get one degree from a top school. Still, I think all of these programs are awesome.
     
  10. nyfaisal

    nyfaisal New Member

    NYU Stern is one of the top part-time MBA programs, and it allows 5 years to complete. Baruch allows 6 years. It only makes sense because a 60 credit MBA will take at least 3 years for someone with a meaningful full-time job function. You only have 16 hours or so a day and work+ commute+ dinner can easily take up 13-14 hours of it. Where are you going to squeeze in the extra hours for classes, if you do not try 1-2 course every semester? I leave at 7 in the morning and get back home by 730 -8 pm earliest, and will have to seek manager's permission to leave early for 6 PM courses.
     
  11. major56

    major56 Active Member

    The material benefit is to Cornell and Queens e.g. essentially double the fees and divide the revenues. The perceived value goes to the student.

    Like you … I’d too frame them both.:cool:
     
  12. major56

    major56 Active Member

    I’m not from the Northeast, but you must not care for Syracuse (Whitman) (?). Not the top B-School available, but most certainly their MBA would be both recognizable and credible in the marketplace … and at $62K, not too pricy.
     
  13. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

    If you're concerned at all with the general idea of reputation then you should consider the UMass Amherst program over the UMass Lowell program.
     
  14. AUTiger00

    AUTiger00 New Member

    I realize Stern is a top program, but it isn't available via distance. You would have to attend classes at one of NYU's two campus locations and from your earlier comments I thought the commute into Manhattan was a deterrent for you. You mentioned you got a 700 on the GMAT, do you mind if I inquire as to your undergraduate institution, major, GPA and professional work experience? I think that would help people on the board make recommendations. You mentioned having to seek a manager's permission to leave early for class which makes me think -and this isn't meant as an insult in anyway-that you are closer to entry-level/lower level management than upper management. If that is the case, the Executive programs we have been discussing would likely be disqualified from consideration as you wouldn't fit the entry requirements for them. Can you tell us a bit about your background?
     
  15. nyfaisal

    nyfaisal New Member

    BS/MS in CS- NYU, I got accepted to Stern's langone program in 2008, but did not pursue even when I was based in NYC. I think weekend program are taught adjunct faculty member (who I've heard have little or no teaching skills), and evening program is not an option now(due to distance).

    About me: 7 years of work experience, currently a project manager in financial services, specializing in IT Audit & Risk Management. MBA will be to learn the finance related materials I did not learn in college --I had no business/finance exposure before joining the industry, and at times face difficulties (read books or research online) designing appropriate solutions based on business needs.

    I did receive 3-weeks on-the-job training in Finance, which was a crash course given by a professor from INSEAD, however I hope to learn a few management related skills , which can definitely help in later phases of my career. I completed the CFP certificate course from NYU B&M few years ago and have basic knowledge about individual financial planning, but want to pursue CFA route at later stage, to understand the intricacies of the finance world at institutional level. I know that CPA would have helped in Audit related positions, but I do not think I will like accounting, but MBA will give me the opportunity to try out these subjects that I otherwise have no exposure to. I also believe this will be helpful into getting into management position within the current industry.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 28, 2011
  16. nyfaisal

    nyfaisal New Member

    AUTiger00, I just read through your comments, and I concluded that you have little or no business experience, or have no idea about the traffic/commute times in NY/NJ Metro. It's customary to let the manager know in advance (ie in the beginning of semester) if you're going to be stepping out early on certain days for a class. This applies to all employees with critical tasks--my manager would let me know if he's leaving early some days, just to make sure there is someone who can be reached in the department. 9-6 is typical professional day in NYC business world, and if I am leaving an hour early, I definitely need to inform other team members, so they exclude me from a meeting around that time. This only makes sense. Also, my background information is probably unnecessary, as I am only asking if I missed any schools of good reputation that I have not applied to. If I apply and get accepted into a school, it does not necessarily mean I will end up going there--this question was just to find out the options in general given the criteria in the original post, rather than a specific course that my background may or may not fit into. For example, I got into MIT for Computer Engineering MS, but did not pursue because I could work full-time in my home area, and get reimbursement for going to a local school (NYU). I also have a family and a child, so my selection criteria would be as strict, if not more, than selection methods used to screen out candidates in a top university. Even if Wharton offers me admission, I can't leave my job to attend there. I hope you have better understanding of the situation and would refrain for mindless guessing on my background :)
     
  17. AUTiger00

    AUTiger00 New Member

    Actually, seven of my 9 years work experience was in the business world and 18 months of that required me to work in Manhattan 2 days a week. I'm more than aware of how the professional world works and know that once you reach a certain level you don't need to ask permission to leave work early. I'm not going to get into an argument with you on here, I was merely trying to help. Perplexed by why your previous post you spelled out your background and then followed that with a post chastising me for asking. At any rate your background sounds impressive, you should have no problem getting into the program of your choice. Best of luck to you.
     
  18. nyfaisal

    nyfaisal New Member

    AUTiger00, "not meant as an insult in anyway", I still stand by my earlier comments that your business experience is not real-world--if I am going to be out 1 or 2 days REGULARLY due to class, why won't I let others know??? Not doing so will go against work ethics and general business courtesy rendered to others who may be expecting you at work during those hours. I am saying that being a VP, and direct report of CIO of a big-4 investment bank. Outside of academics, real business world is definitely different than one you experienced. If you are serious about your career, I do not recommend you to believe on this hearsay that you'll ever reach a critical position with a reasonably professional employer that you can come and go anytime you like, unless your position demands flex-hours (e.g. sales). I definitely do not feel that I should go to school on company's time and hide the fact.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 28, 2011
  19. nyfaisal

    nyfaisal New Member

    Apart from the ranting, I got the right responses I was looking for. I will attend the quick-decision day on Saturday for SUNY Binghamton, and apply to UMass Amherst. FYI, I ruled out Syracuse because the perception in the area of that school is of a party school, and think UMass is a better value. Both schools fit my budget, and I should be able to get reimbursement to take 4-5 courses each year, because the costs are so reasonable.
     
  20. AUTiger00

    AUTiger00 New Member

    Ok, I question you being employed by one of the large I-banks because first, no one working in I banking is getting home at 7 at night as you stated you do and second, if you're working in that culture you're not looking at SUNY-Binghamton or UMass Amherst for your MBA. Again, best of luck to you. By the way, since you decided to turn this into a bickering match. Be sure and brush up on your English writing skills, they need some work. Good luck.
     

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