Non-traditional route to full-time professorship

Discussion in 'General Distance Learning Discussions' started by chrisjm18, Feb 3, 2020.

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  1. Vonnegut

    Vonnegut Active Member

    It’s a very small teaching college in a very poor and rural area. From the demographics, a couple of faculty members from there would have almost 3x the average household income. For someone who loves the mountains, a small A-frame with a wood burning stove, a few acres with a garden, with faculty hours and summers off... might not be a bad proposition. If you’re striving for the McMansion in a flossy or smart neighborhood and Ferragamo... not so much... to each their own. I imagine for those without other obligations and who enjoy a mountain lifestyle... it could be an attractive option.
     
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  2. chrisjm18

    chrisjm18 Well-Known Member

    True. To each their own. I'd go to KSA to teach while other might not :)
     
  3. ITJD

    ITJD Active Member

    Fair enough.


    Thanks. Appreciated.

    I will continue to hold on to my opinions and assertions though. If only to prevent you from replying to me ever again ;)
     
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  4. chrisjm18

    chrisjm18 Well-Known Member

    :D Sometimes silence is better than having the last word.
     
  5. JoshD

    JoshD Active Member

    At my undergrad university, there is a tenured business professor with a PhD from Walden University. Strangely enough, their MBA was from the Price College of Business at the University of Oklahoma. I would venture to say she got the position due to her MBA and then completed the PhD while teaching.
     
  6. chrisjm18

    chrisjm18 Well-Known Member

    If you're talking about Stacey Bolin, she has a DBA from Walden, not a Ph.D. https://www.ecok.edu/directory/stacey-bolin

    According to her Linkedin page, she started at ECU in 2011 and her DBA date is 2012 - 2015. So, you're correct that she gained her position at ECU based on her MBA (even though she probably was an instructor until she completed her DBA she made Asst. Prof., IDK).

    I don't think it would be far fetched that ECU would employ someone with a doctorate from an online program. Not to knock your school, because you certainly went to a better undergrad school than I did, but ECU is a tier-2 ranked school and its business school does not have AACSB accreditation. The dean of the school of business doesn't even have a doctorate.
     
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  7. JoshD

    JoshD Active Member

    Oh absolutely. ECU does have some awesome faculty being that it is a smaller university and ACBSP accredited. Dean Godwin did his MBA at Southern Methodist and there is an economics professor with a PhD from Clemson.

    That said, I could see them hiring instructors with doctoral degrees from online institutions. It works for them though seeing as how much of the faculty is likely not heavily involved in research.
     
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  8. chrisjm18

    chrisjm18 Well-Known Member

    You are absolutely right! Here's a perfect example: https://www.linkedin.com/in/randall-stone-phd-cpa-pfs-ctp-5b725839/

    I know Nehaus already pointed out that you're wrong, but here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/randall-stone-phd-cpa-pfs-ctp-5b725839/
    That guy is an Instructor and Horne & Company Endowed Professor of Accounting at East Central University. He earned his Ph.D. at Northcentral University.

    His profile reads: "Non-tenure track faculty appointment to the Stonecipher School of Business, Department of Accounting."
     
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  9. JoshD

    JoshD Active Member

    Dr. Stone is a great professor according to my wife. himShe had for a few classes and he genuinely cared about the students success. She told me that he was one of her favorite professors her time in the business school at ECU.
     
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  10. sideman

    sideman Active Member

    I had a former junior high teacher that retired and worked for me to supplement his teacher retirement from Texas. In his last school year he made $70k from his teacher salary in our district (30 years of service). Upon retirement he receives 60% of his former salary. Guess the amount? Yep, you guessed it....$42k for life.
     
  11. chrisjm18

    chrisjm18 Well-Known Member

    Maybe he started that job way back when the devil was a boy and was making $10k a year. Some schools pay handsomely, especially the public schools. The one where I live pays a minimum of 46k for someone with a bachelor's and max at 67k. The min for someone with a doctorate is 52k and the max is 84k. No, I'm not saying that 67k or 84k is handsome.
     
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  12. JoshD

    JoshD Active Member

  13. chrisjm18

    chrisjm18 Well-Known Member

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  14. JoshD

    JoshD Active Member

    I'll have to double check but Emporia State recently changed their website around. I believe their business school has a couple of tenured professors with degrees from Walden. I could be wrong though.
     
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  15. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly

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  16. sideman

    sideman Active Member

    Not trying to create conflict here, but back in 1990 was hardly when the devil was a boy and if he made $40k a year then he was still able to afford a nice house in a good neighborhood and still raise 2 kids. $10,ooo a year for four people back then was still below poverty level. And then still have his salary almost double in a 30 year time period. Would like to see if someone with a bachelors starting now at the high end of $67k doubling to $135k by a 30 year retirement. That'll be the day when a junior high teacher makes that kind of money here in Texas (absent coaching duties).
     
  17. chrisjm18

    chrisjm18 Well-Known Member

    The key is not to rely on your pension as the only source of income. Also, staying in K-12 doesn't mean remaining as a teacher for 30 years. At my school, we have a president, a principal, 2 assistant principals, and about 8 department chairs. In public and private school systems, there are also superintendent and assistant superintendent positions.
     
  18. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

    Yeah, but do the math. Not every teacher can become a Principal, even if they wanted to
     
  19. chrisjm18

    chrisjm18 Well-Known Member

    That's true of every field. There can only be one person in the top spot at any given time.
     
  20. Rich Douglas

    Rich Douglas Well-Known Member

    Not if you create your own. Or not if you define it by other means than organizational hierarchy.
     

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