MSc in Forensic Computing and Cybercime Investigation

Discussion in 'IT and Computer-Related Degrees' started by BlueMason, Jun 15, 2009.

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  1. BlueMason

    BlueMason Audaces fortuna juvat

    Came across this one in my search... University College Dublin, 100% online with the only caveat being that exams have to be taken at approved test centres. I e-mail this morning and am waiting for a response for the location of those centres... sure looks like a great programme. It can be done in two years via part-time studies, cost is €5660 for non-eu members ($7,800USD) / year.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 15, 2009
  2. soupbone

    soupbone Active Member


    Very interesting. Here are the entry requirements:

    Entry Requirements
    Applications are accepted only from employees of law enforcement
    agencies. Candidates are expected to have a qualification in policing
    and considerable prior training / experience in information technology
    or cybercrime investigation. Alternatively, a law enforcement employee
    with a primary degree in computer science or related discipline
    is eligible. Applications will be considered on a case by case basis.


    I wonder if this program could be entered into without a bachelor's degree if you could provide a basis of your knowledge and training. Since applications are considered on a case by case basis it might be possible. I might send them an email with a few questions just to see what they say. Like the Heriot MBA I wonder what the utility of this degree would be within the US. Thanks for posting this link!
     
  3. soupbone

    soupbone Active Member

    From the website:
    Entry Requirements
    Students entering this course will be expected to have an employment contract with a law enforcement agency and to either have at least a second class bachelor's degree in Computer Science or a cognitive discipline or, alternatively, a signifiant amount of training or practical experience in forensic computing/cybercrime investigation. Each application will be assessed on a case-by-case basis.

    Ok so I have my Associates degree but the second part of the qualifications I'm pretty sure I meet. I'll definitely send them an email and let you guys know. I'm very interested in this now.
     
  4. BlueMason

    BlueMason Audaces fortuna juvat

    I just received word back from Dr. Gladyshev - he said that there are no test centres in North America, though he said that only two trips to Dublin would be required for examinations...

    Who'd have thought... get a Masters in CFCI while also seeing Ireland! :)
     
  5. soupbone

    soupbone Active Member


    True it would be fun but it would also add a pretty hefty expense as part of the overall cost. Hmmm....still it's an interesting looking program.
     
  6. sentinel

    sentinel New Member

    Once again another organization, in this case an institution of higher learning, thinks criminals and other ne'er-do-wells do not have access to such information already or in the near future. Hint: As gamers are to general computing so are criminals to law enforcement.
     
  7. soupbone

    soupbone Active Member


    Congrats on starting the LLB! [​IMG] I always wondered how keeping non law enforcement people out of programs like this has any effect? The quick answer is no. Obviously in this day and age people have access to just about anything their heart desires when it comes to information. I still think we should have programs such as these though.
     
  8. sentinel

    sentinel New Member

    Thank you. I am looking forward to the challenge. My only regret is I should have earned an undergraduate degree followed by law school some 20+ years ago. Oh well, with age comes wisdom or so I have been told.
     
  9. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

    Hey I'm wondering if the travel expenses (and maybe others) could be used as (business related) income tax deductions.
     
  10. soupbone

    soupbone Active Member

    Claiming it as an education credit? That's a good question. I wonder if we have any cpa's here on the board that could answer this question.
     
  11. BlueMason

    BlueMason Audaces fortuna juvat

    Received another e-mail yesterday - more info on this programme:
    While it looks like a great programme, for those of us who reside outside of Europe, having to make four trips to Dublin is a bit much; particularly for a "welcome meeting" (what about teleconference?)..

    ..just thought I'd pass it along :)
     
  12. soupbone

    soupbone Active Member


    Man I was told it was only two trips for the examinations. I am honestly ready to apply to this program but I cannot travel four times to Dublin (although it would be exceptionally fun). I wonder what the possibility of this university working with one here in the U.S. (possibly one in my area) to allow proctors for the exam. I wonder if there are any universities here in the U.S. that allow entry into a master's prior to receiving a bachelor's? Thanks for the update. :)
     
  13. soupbone

    soupbone Active Member

    Just a quick update. In speaking with Dr. Gladyshev I believe that U.S. students might be able to work out a testing option possibly in New York. Nothing was certified but I believe that if travelling to Ireland is too problematic they would be willing to work with the student to an extent which is very positive in my mind. I am still trying to decide between UCD and Macquarie but UCD really seems like a top notch program. From all of my communications with Dr. Gladyshev I would not hesitate to say that he really cares about potential students and is making every effort to accommodate them.
     
  14. RFValve

    RFValve Well-Known Member

    I have been in IT for almost 20 years including security. As IT is too dynamic, I don't know if a so specialized master's would be such a good idea. I believe certifications are a much cheaper and acceptable route than an academic master's. I would do a time resistant master's such as IS or Engineering and complement it with a certification. For digital forensics, I would do a CISSP and a forensic investigator certification. In the future, if security is not longer required or saturated, you can just switch to a different field by completing another certification. If you have a master's in digital forensics, it would be hard to switch to something else later.
     
  15. BlueMason

    BlueMason Audaces fortuna juvat

    With computer / hardware / data transmission advances being so rapid, I don't think that the field of DF will be saturated anytime soon. I got an e-mail from Duke University today and was told that they intend on offering an online masters in DF next fall...
     
  16. RFValve

    RFValve Well-Known Member

    If you really want to do forensics, I would do forensic accounting and not computer forensics. Forensic accounting programs also cover computer forensics but the difference is the rate that a forensic accountant charges in comparison to a computer forensic specialist. Most computer forensics specialist that I know are kids that learned how to hack into computer devices and recover data, most of the kids barely finished high school. On the other hand, most forensic accountants have master's degree or certifications including IT training. Forensic accountants normally also get their money as expert witness while computer forensic specialist normally support the forensic accountant but rarely get to charge small fortunes to be expert witness.

    From the financial point of view, it makes more sense to get a master;s in forensic accounting. You can still do the computer forensics thing but have a more time resistant qualification that can be used for a life time.
     
  17. soupbone

    soupbone Active Member

    It might be a regional issue because where I live CFE's make an above average salary but the jobs are tougher to find. My friend in New York makes a very high salary in computer forensics but he is also a manager. The guys starting out don't make all that much. As far as this MSc is concerned I think it appears that it doesn't pigeon hole itself into just computer forensics. It also takes on the actual investigative side as well as the management of forensic units.

    Oh and here is a bit of advice so some of you don't make the same stupid mistake I did. Federal Stafford loans DO NOT apply toward overseas DISTANCE ED degrees. They do apply toward them if you go to school in person but for some reason discriminate against distance ed. I made this mistake and now I have no way of getting a loan to attend this MSc or the Macquarie program. I've been pretty bummed the last few days because I've spent a lot of time and effort into getting accepted. What gets me is that Sallie Mae allowed this entire process to go forward even after knowing this program was online. :confused:
     
  18. RFValve

    RFValve Well-Known Member

    Many forensic accountants are self employed. The same can be said about computer forensics specialists. I think computer forensics can be a good option for those already involved in legal professions. However, I'm still skeptical about this as a long term career, Devry and so other hundred Universities opened computer forensic programs. Do we really need hundreds if not thousands of computer forensic specialists? What would be the advantage of a person with a MS in Computer Forensics versus a M.Sc in Computer Science with a Forensics certification?

    I'm also interested in the field of forensics and currently working towards the CFE. I particularly don't think the CFE would make me millions but I'm planning to use it for computer investigations. I have IT and Security background so the CFE could be just a way to show proficiency in Investigations.

    Anyways, good luck in your search and hope your dreams come true.
     
  19. sentinel

    sentinel New Member

     
  20. soupbone

    soupbone Active Member

    I've seen ads popping up with recently started programs such as Devry. Having thousands of new CFE's would obviously be problematic as it is in any field but I think what starts to set others apart is the certs. The EnCe, CFE, etc all hold a pretty decent weight in this field. I agree that an MS in Digital Forensics might be too concentrated versus getting an MS in CS then working toward the EnCe, CFE cert, etc. This particular program doesn't appear to focus just on computer forensics which is why I am interested in it. Some of the courses are in management and investigating high tech crimes. I'm not sure that the other MS in Computer Forensics have these other options but I may be incorrect.

    I will say that lately computer forensics is being replaced as a money maker by eDiscovery. So if you are interested in this field I would look at moving toward that path. I've been working on my EnCe for what seems like forever because when I finally get down to studying I always have something major happen. Thankfully it hasn't affected my school. Hopefully this time nothing stops me because I'm getting tired of starting over. I've been doing forensics and investigations for too long not to have completed this yet... :D
     

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