Harvard Business School

Discussion in 'Business and MBA degrees' started by TEKMAN, Jun 30, 2020.

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  1. JoshD

    JoshD Active Member

    1. I’m not naive or inexperienced.

    2. We will just have to agree to disagree. I understand that things do not play out like textbooks say however, the goal is to ELIMINATE bias. If you acknowledge that you would have a bias, that shows you conforming to everyone else instead of staying true to convictions. I guess I approach hiring differently than others. It’s worked out for me so far. ‍♂️
     
  2. Maxwell_Smart

    Maxwell_Smart Active Member

    Your post on this says otherwise. Sorry, I've been around the block more than a few times.

    That in bold is utter nonsense.

    In any case, if you truly believe the "goal" is to ELIMINATE bias and that it's the commonly shared idea in the business world, then that's totally naive thinking that doesn't at all reflect the reality of how these decisions are routinely made. And while you see biases as a bad thing, understand that view is yours and not shared by all others in the process. You just have a lot to learn about the real business world and the way it really works, and you will see and learn exactly what I've talked about at some point whether you agree with me now or not.
     
  3. JoshD

    JoshD Active Member

    I said the GOAL should be to eliminate bias. I NEVER said that actually occurs in the business world. However, to openly state that you would insert your personal bias goes against what SHOULD be occurring within hiring committees.

    That said, I’m not going to sit here and listen to personal insults about my experience, lack of knowledge, etc. I could care less what your experience is. I guess I just hold myself to a higher ethical standard and I have applied that to my business world experience and will continue to do so. To avoid any conflict, I am respectfully removing myself from this discussion/debate as I do not foresee it leading to any good.
     
  4. Life Long Learning

    Life Long Learning Active Member

    Maxwell_Smart,

    The fact that Harvard Business School fills these EE programs tell me many companies in the real world are paying the 75k. The same can be said at the other M7 business schools.

    I have not attended HBS (but will CBS soon), but I have from Harvard Kennedy School many times. HKS averages $9,700/week. Tons of companies pay their folks to attend. The US Gov't fills many seats also by the thousands (Civilian & Military) annually. I think your assessment is not current? Have you been to any EE's or are you just thinking out loud?
     
    JoshD likes this.
  5. Rich Douglas

    Rich Douglas Well-Known Member

    I'm not sure how you can make that assessment. Clearly, it is "worth" it to someone.

    (Full disclosure: I attended an executive development program at the JFK school at Harvard. It was "worth it" to my employer to pay for it.)
     
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  6. Maxwell_Smart

    Maxwell_Smart Active Member

    So you weren't listening. I never said I would "openly insert my personal bias" (although I wouldn't look favorably on a candidate having spent 75K of the company's money on a certificate, no, I have a right to that viewpoint and I know I wouldn't be alone on that either). I simply said that biases do play a role in these decisions, because they do. This isn't a far-out statement and I think anyone who has spent any amount of time in the corporate world would know this. However, we are dealing with human nature and that causes all of us to use some personal positions in our decision-making, no human is immune to it and that does include you.

    Oh, good grief. It wasn't an insult, believe me, when I insult you you'll know it. It was an observation from experience based on the statements you made.

    You mean you couldn't care less. Maybe that's part of the problem. You don't care and you have everything figured out.

    I appreciate the high-road attempt, but your passive-aggressive anger is misplaced. You were speaking as if biases don't get injected into these decisions and you're simply wrong about that. You wrote it, not me. I never said you should do it or that it's even a good idea, I just said it happens. Learning to listen carefully is another thing you need to work on, but since you've decided to take your ball and storm off in a huff, even that won't be accomplished here. Good luck.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2020
  7. Maxwell_Smart

    Maxwell_Smart Active Member

    There are many better ways to spend $75,000 than on a certificate. People do a lot of things. Simply because people do it doesn't make it the best way to spend it. One person presented this as bridging a gap, but as I said earlier, when competing with people for a high profile executive role who have advanced degrees from top schools already, if you don't have one as well that $75K certificate is not going to get you over the hump.
     
  8. LearningAddict

    LearningAddict Well-Known Member

    Almost anything can be worth something to someone. This is all subjective, and I bet there is something someone has paid a high amount for that you would feel isn't worth it.

    Was it $75,000?
     
  9. JoshD

    JoshD Active Member

    How can you say learning to listen carefully is something I need to work on? You cannot deduct from this forum what I need to work on since I have made a conscious effort to avoid conflict. Literally, go through my posts here and this thread is the “biggest conflict” I have been in. You honestly cannot come to any conclusion on what I need improvement on based on the little interaction here.
     
  10. Maxwell_Smart

    Maxwell_Smart Active Member

    I have read your posts. You are quite knowledgeable and level-headed. I can't dispute that, so perhaps I may have overstepped there.
     
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  11. Life Long Learning

    Life Long Learning Active Member

  12. Life Long Learning

    Life Long Learning Active Member

    Last edited: Jul 18, 2020
  13. LearningAddict

    LearningAddict Well-Known Member

  14. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    Who would be the first eliminated from hiring? The guy who spent $75K on a Harvard Cert -- or the guy who spent $2,000,000 on a game? And don't worry about Tyra Banks. She's not likely to show up in your company's interview room. She does OK for herself, I'm sure.

    And as for Mr. Tata - I hope that cert. was "comped" like casinos do for high-rollers. Harvard would have nerve charging him for it if he stepped up to the plate for four buildings! And as to any certificate's value, I can see a conversation going something like this:

    Interviewer: "I see you have a certificate from HBS - what do you think of the value you received? Was the learning worth what you paid?
    Candidate: "No, definitely not. I learned a thing or two - the instruction was good, but not $75K good. I think that's impossible for a course like that. The value was in the people I met. One company now does $20 million a year with us -- and we ended up a while later, buying into another person's company. They handle 40% of our production, now....

    YMMV - It may or may not be the best way to spend 75K. Personal and situational factors at play here.

    If I spend $10,000 on a guitar, it's ridiculous. If Pat Metheny does - no problem.
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2020
  15. LearningAddict

    LearningAddict Well-Known Member

    LOL! If you can afford 2M on a video game, the only reason you would need to be hired at that point is because you've blown all of your money, probably on video games, lol.

    I think you make a good point though. If you're making the kind of money Tyra Banks has made or even a quarter of that, then the price tag probably may not matter at all. That being said, not all people value money the same way regardless of how much they have. Some people have little and spend beyond their means, and some people have a lot and spend below their means and still see 75 grand as a lot of money.

    The strange thing with Tyra Banks is that she did her Harvard Owner/President Management Program but posed as if she graduated with a full-on Harvard diploma. People didn't take to that too nicely and she got run through the wringer over it. She also didn't help herself by injecting Harvard references into conversations on a regular basis. I suppose even someone as successful as Tyra Banks has been in entertainment still has a weakness for self-aggrandizement and public approval, otherwise she never would've tried to pass the certificate off as more than it was, and she may not have done the Harvard certificate program at all.
     
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  16. Life Long Learning

    Life Long Learning Active Member

    I think highly successful people like being around other highly successful folks and Harvard provides the venue to weed out the riffraff and at a nice profit.:)
     
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  17. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    I'd agree. An entertainer's career is built on public approval - and self-aggrandizement is sometimes used to attract that approval. Logical enough, but not the best means to that end.
    Indeed. A "safe space" for the stars. A win-win.
     
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  18. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    Last edited: Jul 19, 2020
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