Advice please!

Discussion in 'General Distance Learning Discussions' started by armywife, Apr 29, 2010.

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  1. armywife

    armywife New Member

    I have a BA in Psychology and a M.Ed in Education. I have teaching license from the state of Texas. I've started working for an adoption agency doing home studies for Child Protective Servies. It has nothing to do with my teaching degree but I love it and I can do it from home. I wish that I had gotten my undergrad degree in Social Work instead of Psychology now b/c then I could sign off on my home studies. As it stands, I have to have someone with that licensure do that. I am enjoying the field of work I am in and not sure where it will all lead. I've been thinking of going back and getting a Doctorate in some kind of mental health field that would give me the ability to get an LPC license here in Texas. At this point in my life, I can't jump through too many more hoops with things otherwise I would go back and get a Social work degree. I just don't have the time so I'm looking for something that is 100 percent online and do-able for me. Any suggestions? Also anyone familiar with Texas laws etc? Thanks!!!!!!!!!
     
  2. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

  3. japhy4529

    japhy4529 House Bassist

    University of North Dakota offers an online MSW for individuals without a BSW. Two on-campus visits are required.

    I just took a quick look at the link Kizmet sent regarding how to become licensed as a psychologist in Texas. I would find out if a Licensed Psychological Associate is permitted to sign off on child home studies. If the answer is yes, perhaps you could pursue a master in psychology and go that route.

    As for your question regarding obtaining a doctorate in order to become an LPC... It appears that you would only need a masters degree in "counseling or a counseling related field from an accredited college or university"... "of at least 48 graduate semester hours." A 300 hour practicum is also required, and must be completed as part of the degree program.

    Source: Texas LPC Licensing requirements

    TEXAS STATE BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF PROFESSIONAL COUNSELORS - This links provides details on the type of courses that should be a part of your degree program. It also provides details around the 300 hour practicum requirement.

    As for online graduate programs in counseling and/or counseling psychology, I found one (although there could be more out there) that meets the TX practicum requirement:

    UMass - Boston: MS in Mental Health (qualifies for licensure in MA, should work for TX)



    Best of luck,
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 29, 2010
  4. armywife

    armywife New Member

    Excellent info. Many thanks for finding this out for me. I am always amazed at how awesome and helpful the people here are on this board. It's like having a guidance counselor available but better than any I ever encountered in a guidance counseling office! This program at UND looks PERFECT for me. I am shocked and excited at just how perfect it is!!! This is going to be exactly what I need to sign off on my own home studies and even do counseling if I want to at some point. Yipeee!! I am applying as we speak!
     
  5. Ian Anderson

    Ian Anderson Active Member

    Hi Holly

    Could you comment on your feelings about your Masters in Elementary Ed UOP 2005 (The DL way) and how associates responded to it. In some areas of the USA, or in some professions, or occasionally on this board, there is negativity about the University of Phoenix.
    [my own opinion is that their degrees are too expensive]
    Thanks

    And sorry for diverting the thread a little.

    Ian
     
  6. major56

    major56 Active Member

  7. japhy4529

    japhy4529 House Bassist

  8. japhy4529

    japhy4529 House Bassist

    You're very welcome. I almost did not list this program, since you mentioned wanting a 100% online program.

    Let us know how you make out.
     
  9. armywife

    armywife New Member

    Hi Ian,

    Yes I know that UOP does tend to get slammed from time to time. I'm used to it :) I can honestly say that for my purpose, no one cared where I got my degree. I think if I was going to major in some other subject matter where the reputation or name of my school needed to carry some weight, then I would choose somewhere else to go. However, I had one goal--to obtain an accredited Masters in Education so that I could sit for the state licensing exam and obtain my teaching license. The state of Texas and the school system could literally care less where I went to school. The only thing the school wanted to know was if I had my teaching credential. The degree is not really what they care about . It's just a stepping stone to get to your teaching credential. That is what they care about. When you go for an interview, they don't ask or care where you went to school. They want to know if you have your teaching license. If you have a Masters then you qualify for a higher pay scale. That is the only thing they care about though. I have never even had anyone ask me where I got my Masters from. I can honestly say that no one cares. They want that paper from the state board saying I have my teaching license. At the time that I started the program (2003), it was brand new and it was the only school offering an accredited program that lead to teacher licensure. There were tons of programs out there offering Masters in Ed degrees that led to nothing. UOP was the only one that had the accreditation though so my options were pretty much....UOP ! It really was fine for me. I had very few negative issues and for the most part it was a terrific experience. Yes it was ridiculously priced. They are in the business of making money. I believe my final price was around 30,000. I got lucky and my grandmother paid it off for me when I got divorced! If I still had that student loan, I probably would not even be considering going back to school again! Maybe I shoudl think twice now that I'm remembering how much it cost!
     
  10. major56

    major56 Active Member

    The University of Victoria has Institutional recognition from the Ministry of Advanced Education and Labour Market Development, British Columbia. Additionally, the university has specialized /programmatic accreditation from:

    1. American Psychological Association (APA)
    2. European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD – EQUIS)

    University of Victoria | Ranking and Review

    With its School of Social Work APA accredited … there should be no issue/s regarding UV’s degree recognition or U.S. licensure.
     
  11. Chip

    Chip Administrator

    I was of the impression that, in the US at least, many employers required a degree accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. APA would seem to be at least as well as, if not more respected than CSWE, but do you happen to know anything about this?
     
  12. Chip

    Chip Administrator

  13. major56

    major56 Active Member

  14. japhy4529

    japhy4529 House Bassist


    Just as an FYI... While The University of Victoria is APA accredited, the APA only accredits doctoral programs in psychology. I suspect that their PhD/PsyD in Psychology has the APA accreditation. The MSW would not be included.
     
  15. armywife

    armywife New Member

    Yes without a doubt. When it comes to Social Work, it HAS to be CSWE. Also, I found another program from Univeristy of New England that also apparently does an MSW online. Checking it out as well.
     
  16. jillsmart

    jillsmart New Member

    UNT has a pretty good distance learning program, and a fairly decent School of Community Service. I would also definately look into the UNT Dallas programs as well. But then again, I'm a UNT alumna, so I'm prejudiced.
     

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