‘It’s tough to get out’: Caribbean Medical School Fails

Discussion in 'General Distance Learning Discussions' started by AsianStew, Jan 10, 2022.

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  1. chrisjm18

    chrisjm18 Well-Known Member

    Hopefully, soon we'll have another "legit" Caribbean medical school - one that is LCME accredited.

    "The UVI S. Donald Sussman School of Medicine would be the first new Historically Black College and University ( HBCU) medical school since 1975 and the only public HBCU medical school in the nation."

    https://www.uvi.edu/news/articles/2021/21_069_sussman_gift.aspx
     
    Dustin likes this.
  2. nosborne48

    nosborne48 Well-Known Member

    Would Trump University be interested??
     
  3. LearningAddict

    LearningAddict Well-Known Member

    The Canadian political system is something I've always struggled to understand. I'm still stuck on the whole 1993 election matter, lol.
     
  4. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    In being legit? Or in being Historically Black? Sadly, I doubt either. :(
     
  5. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    Indeed. I live here (Canada) and I struggled, too. Once I gave up, as many Canadians have, I felt MUCH better. "lol" is definitely the operative word, here. Well-chosen! :)
     
    LearningAddict likes this.
  6. nosborne48

    nosborne48 Well-Known Member

    Canadian constitutional law is as dark a thicket in as deep a swamp as anything in theology. You can't even lay your hands on a copy of the document because it isn't a single document. According to the Santa Claus look-alikes in Ottawa, parts of the Canadian constitution are unwritten and parts are as yet "undiscovered". All of this is a consequence of Canadians following the UK example. A single written document would, I suppose, be too "American". One characteristic of the "unwritten constitution" is that the justification "We've always done it this way." carries substantial legal force. Over time, the result is opaque and confusing.

    This is my view as an American trained lawyer and (minor) judge. There is an opposing viewpoint that I will leave to someone better qualified to present.
     
  7. The powers of the crown, sometimes defined, mostly not and as often as not used by pols and bureaucracy in any manner they choose, with very, very little risk.
     
  8. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly Staff Member

    Canada: "...and for that reason, I'm out."
     
    LearningAddict and Dustin like this.
  9. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly Staff Member

    And that's different from the U.S.?
     
  10. Dustin

    Dustin Well-Known Member

    Of course common law is also the dominant legal system in the US, but the US constitution seems to be reinterpreted regularly.

    It might be my ignorance of Canadian law but the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the Canadian equivalent to the Bill of Rights, has not seen as many reinterpretation of the same text.

    (This article does offer a few strong examples of that happening though so maybe this is an issue on both sides of the border: https://c2cjournal.ca/2018/12/how-to-take-back-the-charter/)
     
  11. nosborne48

    nosborne48 Well-Known Member

    The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms is roughly equivalent to the U.S Bill of Rights which comprises the first ten amendments to the U.S. constitution. No more and no less. The current Canadian Constitution Act does spell out some things fairly clearly but it also refers hither and thither. The U.S. constitution and the bulk of the court case references interpreting it are comparatively compact and readily accessable. Try it sometime and you will see what I mean. The U.S. constitution is also quite specific in establishing the various federal offices and the powers, duties, and limitations of those offices.
     
  12. The charter is however only the law when the government wishes it to be, this the notwithstanding part, where they can fairly easily ignore it.
     
  13. Dustin

    Dustin Well-Known Member

    I'm not sure I understand. You're saying that the Canadian Constitution Act should be equated to the US Constitution excluding the amendments, and that the caselaw on that part of the US constitution is pretty compact and accessible? Versus the Charter which is more akin to the Bill of Rights, which in the US is re-interpreted fairly regularly? Or did I get lost.
     
  14. nosborne48

    nosborne48 Well-Known Member

    No. Not at all. I'm merely saying that the U.S. constitution, being a fairly concise document, is more easily accessed and understood by the average citizen. That advantage also applies to the Charter of Rights and Freedoms which was drafted in that way for that reason. The remainder of Canadian constitutional law is much harder to locate, assimilate, and understand.
     
  15. nosborne48

    nosborne48 Well-Known Member

    By the way, this thread has to be among the Top Ten Most Thoroughly Hijacked!
     
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  16. Dustin

    Dustin Well-Known Member

    It follows a very meandering path but each post connected to the one that came before it!

    Carrib Medical Schools -> Medical schools in general -> Canadian medical schools -> Canadian political system -> Canadian constitutional law -> US vs Canadian constitutions
     
    Rachel83az likes this.
  17. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly Staff Member

    I spent half a year in Bellingham in the mid-'90s (including winter) and liked the vibe, so I know I'd be okay in Victoria.

    That's somewhere on my t0-d0 list.
     

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