Which path for an Electronics Technician degree/diploma?

Discussion in 'General Distance Learning Discussions' started by Gonzo543, Jan 2, 2017.

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  1. Neuhaus

    Neuhaus Well-Known Member

    In my opinion, there is much less need for this sort of formal education. There are certifications for electronics techs and I haven't seen any that require graduation from a program. You can learn most of what you need to learn on YouTube for free rather than shelling out money for a diploma. Learn the stuff, get the certification (if you want to get a job doing it) and carry on smartly. Otherwise, just enjoy the knowledge.

    I also enjoy electronics and have wanted to learn to fix them for a while. I've been following a guy on YouTube who refurbs broken game systems step by step. I've followed along. I got one broken Nintendo Switch to work. Very proud. I'm positive I can learn more from videos like that than Penn Foster's classic, but often outdated, black and white books.
     
    Mac Juli likes this.
  2. Mac Juli

    Mac Juli Active Member

    Can you tell me which ones are worth doing? https://www.eta-i.org/ would be a good one, I guess?
     
  3. Neuhaus

    Neuhaus Well-Known Member

    Depends on your goal. With just certification, you're looking at some fairly low level positions. My company hires them, but in no way near the frequency we used to. There is a shift, as of late, to hire people with associates degrees or even bachelors degrees in electronic or electrical engineering.

    Without checking, I believe most of the more robust certs from ETA-I require work experience. The entry level ETA cert can get you through the door, but we're not talking big money here. You're also going to hit a wall where an engineering or engineering technology degree is needed to break through to the next level.

    I'm not trying to be vague or discouraging. But it really depends on what your goal is and where you hope to go beyond that initial goal.
     
    Mac Juli likes this.
  4. Mac Juli

    Mac Juli Active Member

    Hello!


    Well, I am a purchasing manager for electronic components. Having the eq. of an associate degree in Physics helps a little to understand what the heck I am doing, but a certificate in electronic engineering would probably be helpful. However, having a certification is important to me.

    I tried etcourse.com. It is ok, I finished some modules, but, well, it doesn't really *flash* me. But regarding courses, I am not as I am in my love life. I always look if there is something better or cooler around! :)


    Best regards,
    Mac Juli
     
  5. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    I bet you can. But it won't get you a job where I live - or allow you to call yourself an electronics technician. You can learn to fix taps etc. on YouTube but you won't be able to call yourself a plumber-- at least not around here.. It's a regulated occupation. I'm not knocking YouTube. I've learned a ton of guitar licks, bits about programming I didn't know, plus some Dine Bizaad (Navajo language) from YouTube. But none of it will get me into Juilliard (or Mulate's in Breaux Bridge LA.) - or get me a job at Oracle Corp. I could probably bum a ride into Chinle or Window Rock, though.

    Here are the requirements for Ontario: https://www.ontariocolleges.ca/en/programs/engineering-and-technology/electronics
    I'd imagine it's even more stringent in Germany, Mac Juli's home territory. I think you have to have the proper certification before you can do anything.
     
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  6. Mac Juli

    Mac Juli Active Member

    Hello!


    Johann, sometimes I wish you were right. Purchasing manager is not a regulated profession here (and neither manager, consultant or similar important professions). Nearly every good purchasing manager thinks this is not a good thing.


    Best regards,
    Mac Juli
     
  7. Neuhaus

    Neuhaus Well-Known Member

    You'll note that I said hit YouTube if you just want to learn to tinker with electronics.

    My advice here, as in every thread of this ilk, is that if you want to enter a regulated profession you need to find a program that meets the requirements of your regulator. Simple as that.

    There are unaccredited programs awarding unaccredited degrees in things like mortuary science that will 100% get you a license in the state where they're registered. If your goal is to become a funeral director in that state, you're golden. And it may be a better option than a fully RA program in another state that doesn't specifically meet your state requirements.

    More and more, though, on these boards especially we find the default position for anyone wanting to learn anything is wanting to rush out and enroll in Penn Foster or a Penn Foster-like program. If the program meets a regulatory requirement and such regulatory requirement works with your life goal, go for it. If you just have an idle fancy then there are plenty of resources out there.

    Let's not forget that while this board has some serious international representation, the bulk of it is US centric. And in the US you can pretty much call yourself whatever you want. The list of regulated professions here is far smaller than Ontario. In Ontario, I would be regulated as an HR professional. To be honest, I don't exactly see the utility in that but I don't need to, because in the US there is no government regulation of Human Resources.

    The bar to becoming an electronics technician is, if you hadn't noticed, significantly lower than getting into Julliard. As for getting a job at Oracle, come on now, they hire professionals of every ilk. I'm barely more computer literate than my kids and I could get a job at Oracle. It would be in HR but I could say I work at Oracle. It is important to avoid some of these traps that working for company X means you're an expert in Y.

    If our dear friend here wants to become a member of a regulated profession in Germany then asking an HR guy in New York is not the best resource. My position in all of this, however, is that this isn't Quora. I don't come here to answer specific questions for specific people. Ask your question, but my answer is going to be broader than that question so that in 10 years when some new person comes here and necromances this thread the answer isn't quite so limited.
     
    Mac Juli likes this.
  8. Lerner

    Lerner Well-Known Member

    In Germany, the State-certified Technician is at a Bachelor's degree level 6 on German Qualifications and European qualification frameworks.
    The requirement is 2.5 years of approved apprentiatship followed by 2 years of Technical School and the passing of the state examinations.

    Maybe BVT can provide some additional info.
    https://www.bvt-online.de/

    Also, there are other routes.

    A certification rout that can be supplemental to earning a diploma or AS degree
    https://certifiedelectronicstechnician.org/certification/

    And you college. Earning AS degree in EET or ET with B&M labs preferable.
     
    Mac Juli likes this.
  9. Mac Juli

    Mac Juli Active Member

    Hello!


    No, it's not about being a member of a regulated profession in Germany. Something like a state-certified technician would be overkill. It's rather about my personal CPD (with, which is important for me: getting a certificate to brag with). The ETA-I fits this to a T.
    Thanks to all!!


    Best regards,
    Mac Juli
     
  10. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    So do I. Quite often, in fact.
     
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  11. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    Totally right. And the rest of the post, too. I stand corrected. Thanks, Neuhaus.
     
  12. nosborne48

    nosborne48 Well-Known Member

    Hey, Johann, when are you coming down here to try some of that Navajo? It's WARM and SUNNY in New Mexico! Well, right now the pandemic is hitting the Four Corners with horrifying force but that won't be the case forever.
     
    Johann likes this.
  13. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    It'll be a while yet, then. And when I do come, I want all the good people in Navajoland to be warned --- so they don't die laughing when they hear me.
     
  14. nosborne48

    nosborne48 Well-Known Member

    What, you think they're like Quebecers? They will be surprised and delighted.
     
    Johann likes this.
  15. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    Ndaga'. (No.) Tsʼídá háadi da. (Never.) And yes, they will be surprised all right! No doubt.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2020

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