UoP

Discussion in 'Online & DL Teaching' started by jonlevy, May 4, 2018.

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  1. jonlevy

    jonlevy Member

  2. scaredrain

    scaredrain Member

    The job might be of interest to a retiree who has benefits from a previous position and is looking for something to do.
     
  3. jonlevy

    jonlevy Member

    That is a weak excuse for exploitation by an institution that is supposed to be progressive. How would they get away with no benefits for a full time job in the first place, must take some real clever lawyering.
     
  4. scaredrain

    scaredrain Member

    There are many full time contract jobs that do not offer benefits. Perhaps this one is a contract one. It is really up to the individual who applies if the terms of the job is acceptable or not.
     
    SteveFoerster likes this.
  5. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly Staff Member

    Everyone's assumption here seems to be that their goal is to hire Americans. With that salary and the flexibility of working from anywhere, I expect that they aim to poach experienced administrators from universities in low income countries, and that they'll succeed.
     
  6. Phdtobe

    Phdtobe Well-Known Member

    The one week vacation with no benefits seems exploitative even if the job is not geared towards North Americans. In Canada the minimum is 2 week vacation, plus paying into government pension and insurance plans. A salary of 40$kus in the Caribbean is very decent. uOp can do better!
     
  7. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly Staff Member

    Yes, I agree that's an inexcusably parsimonious approach to leave.
     
  8. Bruce

    Bruce Moderator Staff Member

    U of Phoenix is a great way to get your foot in the door with online teaching, but the pay sucks in comparison to other schools. They have a very thorough hiring and even more thorough training process, with mandatory as well as many optional faculty development courses that you can use to pad your resume, and they also have (or at least had) a 50% tuition discount for you and your immediate family members.

    I taught for them for awhile, then moved on to greener pastures. The low pay and the "canned" nature of the courses (everything prepackaged, very little to no flexibility with curriculum and lesson plans) led me to get bored pretty quickly. I would never consider them for a career, but as an icebreaker into online teaching, absolutely.
     
  9. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly Staff Member

    Jon probably should have made clear he was referring to the University of the People, not the University of Phoenix. (Although your good advice probably applies well to either one!)
     
  10. jonlevy

    jonlevy Member

    I asked U of People HR what was up. They responded and said because of their "size" they were exempt from applicable ACA laws. Even if true, their ethics suck especially for a non profit. Also something of a bad odor about any operation, profit or non profit, that engages in exploitation.
     
  11. jonlevy

    jonlevy Member

    UoP is based in California and bills itself as an "American" university, if it is hiring actual employees they need to be US persons or hold a work permit.
     
  12. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly Staff Member

    That's only true if those people are actually in the U.S. Any U.S. corporation with international operations hires people in other countries.
     
  13. jonlevy

    jonlevy Member

    Steve, I doubt that because all the online for profits and non profits (AIU, Purdue, SNHU, etc) would have outsourced to India long ago to save a buck. I think U of People is even more of a cheapskate than the others. Their jobs typically run on the lowest end of the payment spectrum. EGCC which purports a tie in with labor unions is another time waster with sub par pay.
     
  14. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly Staff Member

    You're suggesting that U.S. corporations cannot contract with people in other countries, and that's factually incorrect. I'm sure there's a reason that IHEs in the U.S. haven't seen fit to go that route, but that isn't it.
     
  15. scaredrain

    scaredrain Member

    When I worked for Kaplan University (2008 to 2013), some of the processes of the university were outsourced such as (technical help, administrative processes, and some admission functions). The instructors had to meet qualifications due to accreditation. if it was not for accreditation I am sure most for profit universities would have outsourced to India or another place for cheaper adjuncts. You obviously have a grudge against U of People, so no matter what I or anyone else says, you will find a way to rebuttal and refute anything.
     
  16. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly Staff Member

    I've read accreditation requirements from more than one agency, and I don't remember any specific prohibition against foreign-based faculty for distance learning programs. But sometimes schools self-police to avoid getting in trouble with what they suspect licensure agencies and accreditors might not like. And it's also possible that U.S. schools fear backlash from students if they go that route.
     
  17. Icampy

    Icampy New Member

    One would really have to want to teach to take that position. What are they thinking.
     
  18. jonlevy

    jonlevy Member

    They are thinking how to be cheapskates and chiselers.
     
  19. LadyExecutive

    LadyExecutive Member

    University of the People hired me, but told me I could start as soon as they determined what courses they needed me to teach. This is after I was interviewed at length with a gentleman in Israel. He told me he liked me and wanted me placed in a course immediately. I never heard from the university again. It must have been a little more than a year later, a few weeks ago actually, I received an email from the institution telling me that if I was still interested in teaching, to submit my resume. I did as I was asked simply because I really want to teach and for some reason no one seems to want to hire me. To date, just like the last time--I haven't heard from the University of the People up to now. I have since determined that even if the UOP offers me a teaching position at this point, I would decline. I cannot work in that kind of culture.
     
  20. JoshD

    JoshD Active Member

    Have you considered moving? Often times, teaching positions may be in a location you never thought of looking at. You have a doctorate from a reputable university, albeit maybe not in the greatest field, but nonetheless you have the education. Look into smaller universities versus the larger ones.
     

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