University of the People controversy

Discussion in 'Online & DL Teaching' started by Pastor Lincoln, Jan 18, 2019.

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  1. sanantone

    sanantone Well-Known Member

    Being able to use grants would help a lot of poor Americans. For those who don't qualify for grants, I don't think they care whether or not University of the People could meet the standards to receive Title IV funding. A lot of the DEAC schools that don't participate in Title IV are much cheaper than the average RA college.

    Yes, $4,100 is not free, but it's much cheaper than the overwhelming majority of other colleges. I do think, however, that their marketing is misleading, and one can get a degree from the regionally accredited Big 3 schools for a couple of thousand more. University of the People does waive fees and give scholarships to those living in developing nations, though.

    The money that they're possibly diverting to their for-profit company is fishy, but as long as the exam fees (tuition) stays low, I don't think students will care. I don't know why this guy has beef with DEAC; it's certainly better than ACICS and ACCSC.
     
  2. Phdtobe

    Phdtobe Well-Known Member

    It looks like Shai Reshef is not volunteering. Tuition free should be changed to low cost. I can see fewer people volunteering because of this story.

    If history is any gauge for the future, there will be a news release about how the uop current model is not sustainable so fees will have to increase; then soon there will be profit harvesing with uop being sold, under the guise that the new ownership has the resources to take uop to the next level.
     
  3. A couple years ago I considered UoP until I saw the fees and when I called, only got an automated message telling me to email them. What is the point of a phone number if you only get a recorded message?
     
  4. Phdtobe

    Phdtobe Well-Known Member

    the shine is off - uop is gold plated. A few years ago, there was a religious school in India that had the same business model as uop. There was no tuition but moderate fees. Like uop its degrees has moderate utility.
     
  5. sanantone

    sanantone Well-Known Member

    I don't think they have many paid employees. They have people volunteering for an honorarium of a few hundred dollars a month.
     
  6. JBjunior

    JBjunior Active Member

    Page not found....
     
  7. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

    the link in the op is dead. if anyone has another please post it.
     
  8. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly Staff Member

  9. Guess that was the only article. I cannot find another one. Guess that this thread is on the verge of dying?
     
  10. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly Staff Member

    Unless we start talking about something totally off topic, or until someone resurrects this thread out of the blue with a fresh comment in 2031.
     
  11. sanantone

    sanantone Well-Known Member

    Was the article misleading? Did University of the people respond to them? Interesting.
     
  12. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

  13. Maybe I will win the lottery.
     
  14. Phdtobe

    Phdtobe Well-Known Member

    The pulling of the articling makes me even more interested . Was the article libelous or was it just undue pressure to remove the article? It would have been more useful if there was a correction, or an explanation of why the article was incorrect.
     
  15. In all seriousness, I find it fishy.
     
  16. Phdtobe

    Phdtobe Well-Known Member

  17. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

    If you are sufficiently distressed you might consider contacting the author of the article. Surely he will know why the article was pulled.

    https://muckrack.com/derek-newton-2
     
  18. I would trust University of Sedona quicker, at least they are honest about what they say. University of Sedona outright states that their degrees are for ministry only.
     
  19. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

    The University of Sedona is an interesting choice of examples. Obviously I do not know anything about the inner workings of this school but they would seem to occupy a happy little niche in the higher education system. As the Pastor indicates, they are unashamedly unaccredited and they address this directly and at some length . . .

    "Given that the U.S. Department of Education, by law, can neither praise, credit, discredit, nor accredit a non-secular institution of Higher Consciousness/Spiritual Education, we offer the following list of points for individuals to consider when choosing an institution in which to pursue their Higher Consciousness Spiritual Education. . . ."

    They follow this with an interesting discussion of some very good points about how one might tell a good school from a bad school. You might not agree with their premise or their argument but I'm willing to give them some points for being forthright and honest. I'm also willing to guess that the people who attend this school do not care at all that their school is unaccredited. Some might be glad for it.
     

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