Recommendation Letter

Discussion in 'General Distance Learning Discussions' started by asianphd, May 4, 2020.

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  1. asianphd

    asianphd Member

    Let say I want to apply for a certain scholarship or job position, and they asked for a recommendation letter.

    For you, who attend 100% online, how can you ask for the recommendation letter? Does anyone have experience?
     
  2. Mac Juli

    Mac Juli Well-Known Member

    Hello!


    Usually, I ask my superior / ex-coworkers of my day job to do so!


    Best regards,
    Mac Juli
     
    SteveFoerster likes this.
  3. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly Staff Member

    Day job supervisors are a good choice.

    Also, if you like a course you take, reach out afterwards to the instructor on social media to tell them and connect with them, especially on LinkedIn. I'm still connected on social media with a number of former professors, and they're happy to help with this sort of thing.
     
  4. Mac Juli

    Mac Juli Well-Known Member

    Hello!


    And a bit of good extra advice is that you should *never* ask your subordinates. Either they will come down on you like a ton of bricks. Or they will praise you - but if this is the case, someone will likely think the praise is everything but genuine.


    Best regards,
    Mac Juli
     
    SteveFoerster likes this.
  5. chrisjm18

    chrisjm18 Well-Known Member

    It seems the OP is talking about academic references since they mentioned: "attend 100% online." Assuming I'm correct, I had four professors at Lamar write recommendation letters for me when I was applying for doctoral studies. One even wrote a reference for my current job. I also had one turn me down. He said he didn't know me well enough in 8 weeks. Two of those who provided me references, I took two of their courses. My advice is to ask. Nothing tried, nothing done.
     
    SteveFoerster likes this.
  6. Rich Douglas

    Rich Douglas Well-Known Member

    I don't see a difference in asking your online professors vs. your classroom ones.

    As for the request, just explain what you're doing and what you'd like him/her to comment on. I don't think you can cause harm in asking, even if you get uneven responses.
     
    SteveFoerster likes this.

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