Progression of degrees.

Discussion in 'General Distance Learning Discussions' started by pacificamark, Nov 17, 2005.

Loading...
  1. pacificamark

    pacificamark New Member

    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Pacifica, California
    I'm curious if it's the norm to stay in the same field as you acquire your degrees (i.e. bacherlor's in field x, master's in field x, etc.) or if you can shake it up and get whatever you want after you get your bachelor's? Could you potentially be looked on as unfocused?

    I would think if anything it would make you a more experienced or well-rounded student if all your studies weren't necessarily in the same discipline. Any opinions? I'm fascinated with several differenet fields and would like to study as much as I can afford to.
     
  2. w_parker

    w_parker New Member

    Messages:
    265
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Military
    Location:
    Hawaii
    In my case I went from a BS in accounting to an MBA student. Closely related in my opinion. I have thought about diversifying my degrees to match my interests, but at the same time I also want an education that sets me up as a subject matter expert, plus I needed the hours to sit for the CPA exam, and decided that if I needed the hours an MBA would probably give me the most bang for my buck.

    I have seen many people diversify their degrees, but to be honest, if you are pursuing a specific field of knowledge, in my opinion you are best to stay within the same field. I have built upon my knowledge during my MBA courses, which have given me a more thorough understanding of my given educational pursuits.

    On a side note, if I had enough time I would also pursue a masters in Astronomy and a masters in History, lol, I am somewhat glad I do not have the time or the money, pursuing an MBA and being a full time active duty soldier is more than enough on my plate for now.

    William
     
  3. -kevin-

    -kevin- Resident Redneck

    Messages:
    1,957
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm going to agree with William. I sought a degree in English to augment my technical background. Every management position requires the ability to communicate.

    This actually worked against me as technical training and/or certifications still do not replace technical degrees. So I ended up pursuing other degrees that coincide more to my profession.

    As for pursuing higher degrees I would say that they need to be similar unless you are changing fields. You might also get by with a broad based degree (MBA), especially if it has a concentration.

    I don't think pursuing different fields makes you look unfocused, however it will work against the corporate experience in your resume. For instance, the years I spent obtaining the BA in English could be viewed as down years in a technical field and not count as experience. I was able to mitigate this by working full time while attending school.

    As for several different fields. Like you folks I have several interests and am pursuing masters in multiple fields, one for personal interests and the other for employment.

    My only advice is to realize that degrees are long term investments and goals so choose well.

    Regards,

    Kevin
     
  4. philosophicalme

    philosophicalme New Member

    Messages:
    356
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Financial Analyst- Blah
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    What were you hoping to get a Master's Degree in? I would think some diversity is okay, especially if it will help you excel in your career...Such as a BS in Accounting and Finance and then an MS in Project Management.

    I'm pursuing a BA in Psychology (with emphasis on Social Psychology) and then hope to move onto a MS in Management or Human Resource Management. It may not seem like they relate, but I see the BA as a good foundation for graduate studies in that particular field.

    What does everyone else think?

    Rhonda
     
  5. Michael Lloyd

    Michael Lloyd New Member

    Messages:
    388
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    medical malpractice consultant
    Location:
    Mill Creek, Washington USA
    In some areas of study, such as the physical sciences, pursuing a graduate degree requires an undergrad in the same field of study. As an example, in my original field of chemistry, when I got my masters, a bachelors in chemistry or biochemistry was a prerequisite. Someone with a degree in sociology would not have been accepted into the program.

    Having said that, I personally know many people who got a grad degree in something far afield from their undergrad. Here in Seattle, with the downturns in the dot com and aerospace industries, from which we are only now recovering, there were many aerospace engineers who went back to school and got a computer science masters. I myself have a MSc from the early 1980's, and went on to get a MBA in 2000.

    If you are pursuing education for fun or for its own sake, mixing areas of study is wonderful. If you are doing it with an eye towards job or career training, it is probably best to have related areas of study, unless you are training for a career change.
     
  6. Rich Douglas

    Rich Douglas Active Member

    Messages:
    11,356
    Likes Received:
    0
    A.A.S. Education
    B.S. Business
    M.B.A.
    Ph.D. Higher Education
    Next....????


    Why not? If the degrees you earn reflect your professional needs and growth, why not?
     
  7. Randell1234

    Randell1234 Moderator

    Messages:
    7,768
    Likes Received:
    0
    I would agree with everyone else. There should be a common thread that would run through the degrees. BS Business & Technology, MS - Info Tech Mgt, PhD BA / Mgt, etc.

    They are not identical but there is a theme. I think this shows growth in a field. I am thinking about an MA in Humanities but that is not for a career move...that is for fun.
     
  8. Rich Douglas

    Rich Douglas Active Member

    Messages:
    11,356
    Likes Received:
    0
    Something that, once earned, you might consider omitting from resumes and job applications. (This was a hot topic awhile back.)

    I have a B.A. in Sociology that I almost never list. Also, I never list the associate's degrees. Omitting them aligns my educational history the way the creator of this thread mentioned.
     
  9. potpourri

    potpourri New Member

    Messages:
    250
    Likes Received:
    0
    So from what you're saying if a person has graduated with an Associates degree it's better to list the Bachelor and Masters and skip listing the Associates == is that correct? I thought people get in trouble if they don't list down all thier credentials.
     
  10. BinkWile

    BinkWile New Member

    Messages:
    372
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have a BA in History, my Masters is in Public Administration, and I am pursuing my PhD in Management. I have never had any trouble. If anything, I have been found to be well-rounded.

    Off topic: I see that you are atending AMU. Have they received rgional accreditation yet?
     
  11. Anthony Pina

    Anthony Pina New Member

    Messages:
    2,967
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    University Administrator
    Location:
    Kentucky, USA
    There is nothing at all wrong with listing an associates degree. I have filled out certain forms where there is space only for one undergraduate degree--in those cases I list only the bachelors. In all other cases, I list the A.A. as well.
     
  12. pacificamark

    pacificamark New Member

    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Pacifica, California
    Lots to think about.

    I've been on the fence for months and I still don't think I've decided what to do even though I'm just starting my BA in Criminal Justice Forensics. I love IT equally as well as I've been futzing with computers since the late 70s.

    I was thinking of a master's in IT or Public Administration. I asked since I have a friend who has their BA in Music and yet works for a major dot com as a web site UI designer and is being recruited by two other major dot coms. So, clearly, at least in my friend's field, degree major does not matter. My friend has no certificates or any other kind of classroom experience in computers.

    As far as listing degrees on a resume I will always put my lowly AA on it as I'm proud of my 4.0 GPA. I earned the degree last year and since I'm almost 40 it shows that I'm still a good study.

    As for the AMU accreditation question I believe they are being visited in January or February for their second evaluation. So hopefully RA is coming. But they have so many degrees to choose from at all levels, I don't mind getting my master's with them.
     
  13. Anthony Pina

    Anthony Pina New Member

    Messages:
    2,967
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    University Administrator
    Location:
    Kentucky, USA
    I have seved on many hiring committees and I have never seen an instance where having degrees on different disciplines was seen as a disadvantage. At the colleges and unviersities where I worked, gradudate schools of business, law and medicine actively recruited those who were getting bachelors degrees in liberal arts, humanities, foreign languages and social sciences (psychology, sociology, history, etc.).
     

Share This Page