Paramedic to RN bridge programs

Discussion in 'Nursing and medical-related degrees' started by Kizmet, May 6, 2019.

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  1. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

  2. sanantone

    sanantone Well-Known Member

    I didn't see a list, and the search box didn't turn up any paramedic to RN programs. People will be better off using Google.
     
  3. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

    I think you need to put your zip code in the search widget and then . . . I don't know. Maybe it's just a bogus link.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. sanantone

    sanantone Well-Known Member

    That's what I was referring to when I mentioned the search box. It only pulled up regular nursing programs, not paramedic to RN bridge programs.
     
  5. copper

    copper Member

  6. Marcus Aurelius

    Marcus Aurelius Active Member

    It's an interesting program for sure, but it is of little use for PAs, MDs, or DOs. It does make sense for some RNs though. It's not uncommon to see someone with both the RN and Paramedic designation working with medical flight crews.
     
  7. copper

    copper Member

    Actually, a lot of licensed healthcare providers get a kick out of volunteering at the local fire department and riding in an ambulance. The EMT certifications are State controlled and part of the EMS system so you could be a board certified ER Physician and still need an EMT state certification to volunteer! So not a waste of time! If any thing, a heartfelt thank you to all the First Responders and especially the volunteers who step up to the plate to serve their communities.
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2019
  8. Marcus Aurelius

    Marcus Aurelius Active Member

    You can definitely volunteer in EMS without EMT certification. How do I know? Because I used to volunteer in EMS.

    You only have to have one EMT in the back with the patient to be legal. That's it. We routinely had extra volunteers who were not certified in anything (other than maybe CPR) ride along with us. Extra help is often needed in lifting patients.

    I once talked a buddy into coming along on one emergency call we had because we were short-handed. He wasn't certified in anything. Our patient was an elderly man who had fallen and cut his scalp wide open. He was pouring blood. I had my non-EMT friend hold a large bandage and apply compression to the wound while I took care of other things.

    If you want to be technical, a doctor would need EMT certification to be the lead medical provider in an ambulance, but not to help out.
     
    cookderosa likes this.
  9. Jonathan Whatley

    Jonathan Whatley Active Member

    Rules around this will vary by ambulance service and by state.
     
  10. Marcus Aurelius

    Marcus Aurelius Active Member

    Yes, they do, but it's really not as rigid as non-medical people (the general public) imagines. I'm not aware of any state that requires everyone who volunteers in EMS to be an EMT. Most new volunteers, in fact, start off without any certification. The volunteer rescue squad I was part of even had a junior division (those under 18). They absolutely got to ride along with us in the back with patients and help out. There are some instances where it's even a good idea to have a non-medical person in the back with you, like the parent of a small child or baby. A parent can help keep an excited kid calm while you take care of them.
     
    Jonathan Whatley likes this.
  11. copper

    copper Member

    Yes, of course volunteerism occurs at all levels and is much appreciated! In regards to the RN, PA, NP, MD, DO to Paramedic program, it provides these medical professionals an accelerated track to Paramedic certification so they can practice and or volunteer to the highest level of the State's EMS protocols for pre-hospital medicine. I responded to the comment "it is of little use to a PA, MD or DO". I disagree! There are many reasons licensed medical professionals obtain the Paramedic certification through this track! In addition to volunteerism, some want to be instructors, some want to moonlight, others may get into State EMS directorships/administration, etc.,etc.. Perhaps you can name a few?? My favorite is Ski Patrol.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2019
  12. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

    We have some volunteers in my neighborhood and one of the things I can tell you is that you need to be mindful of the fact that you can become involved in some very nasty stuff. A big pile-up on the interstate and ambulances get pulled in from small towns where volunteers are not really prepared to be up close and personal with blood and death. It's nice to volunteer but you need to be ready for real life (and death) to happen.
     
  13. Marcus Aurelius

    Marcus Aurelius Active Member

    I think it's a misconception to think that volunteers from small towns don't see much. I'm from a small town, and I can assure you there was plenty of blood and gore. People shooting themselves in the head, fatal car wrecks, attempted (and sometimes successful) murders. Yeah, small towns have that stuff too.

    I responded to a car wreck once on a back-country road where some kid was going entirely too fast in an old Mustang Mach 1. He hit a patch of gravel and would've ended up in the river next too him if it wasn't for that darned tree that stopped him. I've never seen anything like it before or since. The side of his car hit that tree so hard that it broke that old car into two pieces. The only thing still holding it together was a sliver of metal. The car folded in such a way that it crushed his head like a grape. There was brain matter everywhere. It was dripping down the hood of the car, splattered on the tree, and in other places. One of his passengers was killed instantly. He had a large piece of sheet metal lodged in the back of his skull. Miraculously, the other occupant survived, although we had to call for a helicopter to fly him to a trauma center.

    I guess you're right. We didn't really see much in Mayberry.
     
  14. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

    didn't mean to trigger your ptsd but maybe you just proved my point. i'm just trying to say that volunteers need to know that it gets real
     

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