Open Admission Graduate programs in Software Engineering

Discussion in 'IT and Computer-Related Degrees' started by sdbuilt, Aug 21, 2012.

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  1. sdbuilt

    sdbuilt New Member

    Hello, my name is Mike and I wanted to do a complete career change into IT/Computer Science in the field of Software Engineering. I already have a Bachelor of Arts degree from UCSB and I would like to parlay that into a MS degree in computer science.

    I did not get a very good GPA in college compared to my 4.4 GPA in High School. I partied alot and struggled with some alcohol and drug dependency issues that I have been set free from for a few years (through the affection of Jesus). I ended up with a 2.48 GPA for my BA degree, which basically disqualifies me from many graduate schools.

    I am looking for programs similar to Harvard Extension school, where there is an open admissions process. HES is definitely an option for me, but I would like to lay out all the different options and make the best choice possible.

    So, any of you guys know of any other schools (NO FOR-PROFIT schools please) that have open admission and are preferably designed for career change. I would need to probably take some pre-requisite courses in basic programming as a part of this MA program.

    Thank you for your help. :)
     
  2. Gau555

    Gau555 New Member

    Don't let a low GPA discourage you.

    I got admitted to 2 MS Computer Science programs with a 2.27 undergraduate GPA from over 10 years ago. I recently completed an MBA program with a 3.75 GPA, so I'm pretty sure that helped get me, in addition to my work experience.

    For one of the CS programs where I was accepted, required a GRE. I was in the 94th percentile for verbal (very poor score) and 50th percentile for math (also a very poor score) and was still accepted into the program. I didn't study for the GRE because I was already accepted into one program, but took it anyway. :D

    Check this guy out for master of software engineering program (very cheap!):
    NDSU: Distance & Continuing Education (DCE): Online Degrees: Master of Software Engineering
     
  3. Sauron

    Sauron New Member

    Hi sdbuilt,
    The ALM in IT with a concentration in Software Engineering is not exactly open admission. You will need to take 3 courses at the graduate level with a grade of B or higher in order to be admitted to the program. With that said I would not let your undergraduate GPA stop you from attempting a graduate degree in Computer Science or ALM in IT from HES. You will need to fulfill more than just programming prerequisites; you will also need a minimum of one course each of calculus, discrete math and maybe probability and statistics, and at least one course linear algebra also if you plan on studying graphics. For programming courses at the undergraduate level you will need to have at least one year of object oriented programming in C, C++ or Java, data structures, algorithms, operating systems and systems programming. I may have left a few courses out but its quite an undertaking if you have not studied computer science or programmed formally.

    My personal list of graduate software engineering programs to consider in addition to the Extension School are:


    Brandeis
    Master of Software Engineering | Rabb Graduate Professional Studies | Brandeis University

    Regis
    Master of Science in Software Engineering Degree - Regis University CPS

    Carnegie Mellon
    MSIT-SE - Software Engineering Masters Programs - Carnegie Mellon University

    ASU
    Engineering Science (Software Engineering) (MSE)

    FIT
    Masters in Software Engineering | Florida Institute of Technology

    Penn State World Campus
    Penn State | Online Master of Software Engineering | Overview

    USC
    Master of Science in Computer Science with Specialization in Software Engineering | USC Viterbi School of Engineering
     
  4. mcjon77

    mcjon77 Member

    Also, keep in mind that for a lot of schools (probably the majority) there are options for those with deficient GPAs.

    1) Conditional admission. There are several schools that will conditionally admit students who are deemed to be deficient in a particular area. You are held to a higher standard than regular admitted students during your conditional period, but that is it.

    2) Certificates. Many school have certificate programs that involve taking a subset of the degrees for the master's program. The certificate programs often have significantly lower admissions criteria than the master's program. If you do REALLY WELL in the certificate program, it is usually pretty easy to get into the master's program. The reason being that they now have extremely recent, concrete evidence on how you will do in their coursework.

    3) Non-degree student option. Taking a few classes as a non-degree student can have the same effect as getting the certificate. Be warned, however. Frequently, schools have a cap on how many classes you can take as a non-degree student that will count towards the degree.

    HES is a great program, but make no mistake, it is very rigorous. The admissions process is deceptively simple, but can easily wind up being a huge money sink if you can't quite get that 3.0 average and 3 Bs. You would think that it wouldn't be very difficult, but my personal guess is that the majority who make the attempt fail. And unlike other schools, where people find out that they were not admitted after submitting a $50 application, with HES you may not realize that the program is not for you until you have spent $6,000+ on courses.

    One recommendation I have for you is to take your theoretical/mathematical foundations course FIRST. Do not take the other 2 prerequisites before that. the TMF requirement is easily the hardest part of the program. If you can get through that, you should be able to get through the rest of the program. If you can't get past that, then there really is no point going further.

    Back in the old days (10+ years ago) TMF was MUCH more limited (only 2 courses counted, IIRC) and was still a requirement for graduation, but not admission. The end result of that was people put the TMF course off until last, then found themselves finished with all of their other coursework but unable to pass the TMF requirement (CSCI E-124 is VERY proof heavy). Some people wound up not graduating even though they did everything else, because they couldn't pass TMF. This is why TMF became a prerequisite.

    Whatever you decide, GOOD LUCK!
     
  5. msganti

    msganti Active Member

    I am currently enrolled at APU for their Grad Cert in SE. I haven't started classes due to a personal situation. I may start early next year.
    The NDSU MSE looks very interesting. Tuition is tempting (cheaper than APU).
    I did not see any requirement of GRE on their program page. Does anyone know if they need GRE?
     
  6. mcjon77

    mcjon77 Member

    WOW! GREAT FIND!!

    That is a REALLY compelling program. You are looking at less than $12K for an MS in software engineering. To top it off, it looks like they have a PhD in SE too. I don't know how much of the PhD in SE can be completed via DL, but I might call them to find out,

    I am going to give this program serious consideration after finishing my ALM in IT.
     
  7. indiaedu

    indiaedu New Member

    Yes go for some basic courses, only if you are not taking admission in a degree or diploma course. If you take admission in any diploma of degree IT course, then there's no need to do any other course.
     
  8. airtorn

    airtorn Moderator Staff Member

    What does this have to do with graduate programs is software engineering?
     
  9. Thorvald

    Thorvald New Member

    If you don't mind sharing, what were the two MS Computer Science programs?

    Best wishes----Jim
     
  10. Thorvald

    Thorvald New Member

  11. alexjames212

    alexjames212 New Member

    Hi,
    you can also visit Higher Education Online Admission |Afterplus2.Com for learning about the colleges offering software engineering courses. You could also block or book seats via this admission portal.
     
  12. coltivan

    coltivan New Member

    If you want to develop your career in Computer sciences, Web Developing could be your best choice.
     

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