Online Law School

Discussion in 'General Distance Learning Discussions' started by GrandMoffBrandon, Nov 22, 2016.

Loading...
  1. Hi. I am wondering what kind of employment prospects there would be for a graduate of the one the California approved online law schools? I know I wouldn't be able to get hired by a big firm but what practice options are there? Thanks.
     
  2. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

    Well I guess one answer is pretty straightforward. You hang your shingle and do whatever you can to please the people who walk in the door. Probate stuff, real estate stuff, all that regular stuff. Where I live the beginners do it all. They are public defenders, guardian ad litem stuff, they defend people on all sorts of minor charges, little law suits, etc. Their fees are low in order to attract clients and so thy work long hours to make ends meet.

    My second answer is a bit different. The Taft Law School lists their graduates by year of graduation. You could look at the list and then look these people up (LinkedIn, etc.) and see what these people are actually doing. That's the reality of the situation after all.

    Taft Law School
     
  3. Bruce

    Bruce Moderator Staff Member

    Of the CA-approved law schools, I'm partial to Concord Law School (Kaplan), with the big reason being that it's regionally accredited. If you graduate from there, and for some reason don't end up practicing in CA (can't pass the bar, you move, you decide practice isn't for you), then you still have a regionally accredited J.D. degree. That will open up a lot of doors, especially for teaching (not at an ABA law school, obviously), that a degree from an unaccredited or DEAC accredited law school cannot.
     
  4. TomE

    TomE New Member

    Between the fact that one is much less likely to be able to participate in a clerkship while completing up an online law program and the below average Bar passage rates (although the California Bar passage rate is at, like, 45 percent these days across the board!) the online law option is still one to think long and hard about before pulling the trigger. Obviously the flexibility and tuition are the key sellers.
     
  5. decimon

    decimon Well-Known Member

  6. TEKMAN

    TEKMAN Semper Fi!

    I feel that Non-ABA law school degree is hard to practice law in the United States. For some reason, the backdoor would be LB in law from British universities/colleges (i.e: University of London), then LM in Law from other schools in the United States (i.e: University of Southern California) would give better credentials.

    I don't know about others, but for me when I hire a lawyer I want to find the one graduate from good law school.
     
  7. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly Staff Member

    It depends where. A lot of people have no interest in leaving California, and it's not hard there.

    I assume you mean an LLB and an LLM. Yes, this works too, but again, only in certain places (although those places include California, New York, and Washington, D.C., which are are not bad options).

    For something mission critical I want the the one with the best track record of success, for mundane things I want the one who's competent and otherwise the best value. In both cases which law school he or she attended would be tangential.
     
  8. sideman

    sideman Active Member

    If you are truly interested in going to law school, I would suggest you find a school near you, that's ABA accredited, and attend part-time. This way when you graduate and take and pass the bar, you are not obligated to practice in California. If you're in another state you don't have to uproot your family (if you have one) and move. Even if you're in California and want to attend it's probably best to proceed in this direction. You have more options than when you graduate from an online law school.

    Alright so that's the conventional advice. And really it's not bad advice. It just doesn't apply in all situations. Not all of us can dedicate the commuting time to attend and/or the $$$ that conventional law schools charge, etc.. We've all heard how law school grads are having problems getting hired upon graduation now, so you have to consider a lot of things, including opportunity costs and return on investment, before you go in this direction.

    So if you want to attend online. Don't let anyone stand in your way. But realize what you are getting yourself into and understand that it's not for everybody.
     
  9. jonlevy

    jonlevy Member

    I have a degree from Taft Law School, been practicing 25 years with a California and then DC license. Even though Taft is not regionally accredited like Concord, I found both US and South African grad schools did accept their credits. Concord is the only online law school that is regionally accredited; this factors in if you decide to pursue a non law degree at the graduate level.
     
  10. TomE

    TomE New Member

    I think that this is generally the best advice, but it is important to remember that seeking a lawyer, like any other kind of large investment, will differ for people depending on their circumstances. While everyone would like the lawyer from the "best" school, finances and availability will play a factor. There will likely be some kind of market for people with law degrees from all kinds of schools...that market just may not be what one had in mind when they decided to pursue a legal career.
     
  11. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

  12. Sacricolist

    Sacricolist New Member

    California Southern University (www.calsouthern.edu) is another online law school with regional accreditation. They are accredited by WASC. They are also cheaper than Concord Law School.
     
  13. jonlevy

    jonlevy Member

    The ABA law school accreditation requirements are stupid IMO. The law library for example is archaic, most lawyers tossed their books years ago except as decorations, it is all online. Likewise high paid law professors, why should students have to pay for someone else's lifestyle? The professors usually have the same JD the graduate gets.
     
  14. Thanks, everyone. I appreciate all the great information. I will carefully consider everything posted here. I don't know if this is the right option for me or not. Thanks.
     
  15. TEKMAN

    TEKMAN Semper Fi!

    Honest I have no idea why the JD program takes 3 years, but after graduation. New JD holders has to take classes to pass the bar exam and rely on Law manuals and case studies. I think they should lift requirement for ABA accredited for taking the bar exam.
     
  16. TomE

    TomE New Member

    It seems as though there are differing views on what the "problem" really is. Should law school only require 2 year's worth of credits or should/can students be able to finish "accelerated" programs in 2 years? This article talks a bit about why experiments with 2 year programs have failed. It looks like any attempt has simply tried to cram 3 years of credits into 2 years.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/26/business/dealbook/the-2-year-law-education-fails-to-take-off.html
     
  17. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly Staff Member

    Interestingly, in England and Wales there are two year LLB programs for those who already hold a Bachelor's degree in another subject, and those seem to work out all right.
     
  18. Bruce

    Bruce Moderator Staff Member

    But, then what would the lawyer politicians and other self-important a-holes in the US put after their name??
     
  19. jonlevy

    jonlevy Member

    England is so much better in this regard, yes an LLB with a one year training contract, it is also possible to get that degree online.
     
  20. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly Staff Member

    I presume "Esq."
     

Share This Page