Online Adjunct Pay

Discussion in 'Online & DL Teaching' started by DLAdvocate, Jun 14, 2005.

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  1. AhwaGirl

    AhwaGirl New Member


    Hi Tom, I don't know what CTU meant by "fully developed" because I never got that far with them. It was just something they told me during the interview. But my DeVry courses are fully developed and this means that the instructors simply customize the course to their liking (within limits). I usually add some clarifications to the syllabus about thread participation and assignments. But the courses, generally, already contain the lectures, assignments, exams, threaded topics, etc. The course is already built in the CMS and ready to go. I just add some documents I think might be helpful to the students, websites, etc. and make it my own. It only takes a little bit of time before the term starts to get it ready.

    I don't know what other schools have fully developed courses, but I'm guessing they are in the majority. Perhaps others here can respond to that question. I can tell you that I had to build my comm college HR course (I shared the link to it on another thread here) completely from scratch and it took about a year and half (not full-time) to get it ready. A TON of work!

    As far as schools having profs record lectures on CD.... I'm not sure. CTU was the only school that I've run across that requires lectures. Most places are truly asynchronous so lectures from the prof aren't an issue. Maybe some other folks here can comment on this one too.

    Hope this helps. If not, post again. I'll do my best since I'm somewhat of a newbie myself. ;-)

    Jill
     
  2. PatsFan

    PatsFan New Member

    Thanks, Jill. Your comments were quite helpful. It sounds like lectures may be rare and students do a lot of independent work? My only exposure to distance learning is graduate theological education at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary. A friend of mine listens to cd lectures in his distance learning courses. That community college hr course sounded like a ton of work. I hope they paid you well! Thanks again.

    Tom
     
  3. AhwaGirl

    AhwaGirl New Member

    There is a lot of independent work that students do. They must be very self-disciplined to take DL courses/programs, IMHO. Reading the course materials, taking initiative on assignments and team projects, etc. are mostly self-directed with instructions noted in the course and me posting various reminders. My biggest role (besides grading), however, is facilitating the threads They are highly interactive with the instructor acting as guide. At DeVry they prefer that the students dominate (if you will) the threads, while my posts are fewer. There is a fine line between taking over and underposting as the instructor. I'm there to make sure we don't go too far off-topic and that everyone plays nice. ;-) I also keep a bank of additional related topics for us to talk about when things get a bit slow. So those are my two cents on the independent thing. I agree with what you are saying.

    I'm sure other schools use CD lectures, I've just not run across one. Would be interesting though. Perhaps those are more correspondence courses than online. I know one of the local CC's here has an option of a course being taken online or via mail. If mail is chosen, then some info comes on VHS, I think.

    Good luck with everything. Post or PM if you have any other questions. I think it's great that we can share our experiences, opinions, and ask questions of each other. ;-)

    Jill

     
  4. blaketots

    blaketots New Member

    CTU

    I'm going through faculty training with CTU right now and I really like the online live lectures. The lectures must be done two times per week for one hour each. The environment is a chat room where the students can type their comments/questions and the instructor responds with their microphone. Truly, the only difference is that the students can hear the instructor. It seems a bit weird when you first hear about it, but I've participated now in training and it really is wonderful and works easily.

    You can display PowerPoint slides, graphics, etc. while you're speaking. You can also give the students live surveys which can be used for simple quizzes,etc. The students are NOT required to attend these lectures, but each one is archived so that the student can play them back at a time that is convenient for them. The only downside is that there is the potential that no students will show up, so the instructor will be speaking the entire hour without an audience.

    I know that Kaplan uses a Seminar lecture that is a chat room and the only difference I see in the two is that with CTU, the instructor speaks rather than types.

    The CTU courses are fully developed and have some very good multimedia content. The discussion board topics are already developed as well. The instructor does have full control over the live lectures and may talk about anything they like. Some examples include going over a homework assignment, addressing the requirements for an upcoming assignment, or relating a current real-world event or instructor experience as it pertains to the course.

    I think that many potential online instructors are put off by the idea of CTU's lectures, but now that I've experienced it, I think it's really great.

    To my knowledge, there is not a maximum yearly number of classes taught per instructor.

    If you go to this link http://www.ctuonline.edu/business/ and look on the left-hand side you will see a link called "Business Course Demo" -- this will give you a great idea of what the fully-developed course materials look like.
     
  5. blaketots

    blaketots New Member

    CTU

    I'm going through faculty training with CTU right now and I really like the online live lectures. The lectures must be done two times per week for one hour each. The environment is a chat room where the students can type their comments/questions and the instructor responds with their microphone. Truly, the only difference is that the students can hear the instructor. It seems a bit weird when you first hear about it, but I've participated now in training and it really is wonderful and works easily.

    You can display PowerPoint slides, graphics, etc. while you're speaking. You can also give the students live surveys which can be used for simple quizzes,etc. The students are NOT required to attend these lectures, but each one is archived so that the student can play them back at a time that is convenient for them. The only downside is that there is the potential that no students will show up, so the instructor will be speaking the entire hour without an audience.

    I know that Kaplan uses a Seminar lecture that is a chat room and the only difference I see in the two is that with CTU, the instructor speaks rather than types.

    The CTU courses are fully developed and have some very good multimedia content. The discussion board topics are already developed as well. The instructor does have full control over the live lectures and may talk about anything they like. Some examples include going over a homework assignment, addressing the requirements for an upcoming assignment, or relating a current real-world event or instructor experience as it pertains to the course.

    I think that many potential online instructors are put off by the idea of CTU's lectures, but now that I've experienced it, I think it's really great.

    To my knowledge, there is not a maximum yearly number of classes taught per instructor.

    If you go to this link http://www.ctuonline.edu/business/ and look on the left-hand side you will see a link called "Business Course Demo" -- this will give you a great idea of what the fully-developed course materials look like.
     
  6. PatsFan

    PatsFan New Member

    Thanks Jill and Carla. It all sounds fun. I'll check out that link, Carla.

    Tom
     
  7. Joanne Corsica

    Joanne Corsica New Member

    Adjunct Pay

    I would like to know if I have successfully registered and will get paid
     
  8. Writer in China

    Writer in China New Member

    Any updates on what online courses are paying in 2011? What is the pay and for how many weeks?

    I am a writer and am planning to get a Master's in Writing. I am interested in teaching some classes online after I get my Master's degree in Writing.
     
  9. cdhale

    cdhale Member

    Prices vary from school to school, as discussed in the thread. There has been little change in the past three years that I have been teaching online. My pay ranges from 1500 USD per course to 3000 USD per course.
     
  10. Aberdonian

    Aberdonian New Member

    My results are similar to cdhale.The least I get paid is $1200 for a 10 week course ($120 per week) and the most is $3000 for an 8 week course ($375 per week). Although some online adjuncts don't do this, I usually look at a per week basis as the courses I have taught have been from 5 weeks long to 15 weeks long. Of course there are numerous other factors to look at such as time commitment, number of students, faculty interaction required, number of assignments, etc. I have taught at appx. 10 schools online and find that most pay in the $200-$250 per week range.
    I am working on a PhD and actually do teach online as my only source of income. It really can be a feast or famine as others have said. For instance in spring of 2010 I was teaching 8 courses, but in July 2010 I only had one course. I find the best way to adjust for the likelihood of a summer lull is to teach at multiple schools, and I prepared myself a but better for that this summer.
     
  11. Writer in China

    Writer in China New Member

    I am working on my Master's in Professional Writing with Chatham University. I have professional experience as a writer. How difficult do you think it will be for me to break into online teaching? I am interested in teaching undergraduate writing courses.
     
  12. cdhale

    cdhale Member

    It is not easy, to be honest, and it takes a long time, for most of us. But rather than repeat what has already been discussed, you can do a quick search and find several threads on the topic of breaking into online teaching.
     
  13. Writer in China

    Writer in China New Member

    I have read some of the threads already. Thank you for your help.
     
  14. RFValve

    RFValve Well-Known Member

    The worst is TUI that pays 50 bucks per student and expects their marking done within 48 hrs. The better ones in terms of pay and working conditions are Walden and Devry but are also the most difficult to get in, their pay ranges from 2 to 3K per 8 or 6 week course but their demands are reasonable and the work is steady.

    There are some schools out there that pay 10K per course but not the for profit ones. Some online executive MBAs pay in the 10K range but they also look for a strong profile and not just the "teaching machine" type with an online PhD.

    There are many schools to avoid that pay peanuts with unreasonable demands but are also the ones that are hiring all the time so you might want to try them just to get some working experience. Some of the schools with lower reputation for adjunct work are UoP, Axia, Strayer and CTU.

    I also have heard good things about Capella and Nova that seem to be good places to work for.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 22, 2011
  15. douje

    douje New Member

    I agree with you on Devry, I teach a higher level course with them, and I am highly impressed with the preparedness of the students. As for UoP, Axia, Strayer and CTU I have always thought I had no good luck with them, but if your assessment here is accurate then I must consider myself lucky then.
     
  16. cdhale

    cdhale Member

    I also teach for DeVry and enjoy their classes, for the most part. Although this coming term is the first one in two years that I will not have a class for... hope I get one next time.
     
  17. JohnC1

    JohnC1 New Member

    TUI is pretty bad, but they did just give their adjuncts a raise. Le Cordon Bleu just slashed their adjuncts salaries basically in half down to 150 bucks a week. Tons of work, two hour live chats per week plus an additional three office hours. Way too much work for the money. I am not sure how they keep online instructors working there for that pay rate.
     
  18. RFValve

    RFValve Well-Known Member

    Some people in this forum have mentioned that are willing to work for free just for the experience. As PhDs are being churn out like pancakes, you will see more abuse from online schools. It is a buyers market.
     
  19. Randell1234

    Randell1234 Moderator Staff Member

    From what to what?
     
  20. truckie270

    truckie270 New Member

    I am not sure who that would be, but I remember the discussion. I think that those people are infrequent visitors here looking for information on how to break into the field rather than regular members who have a better grasp of the situation.
     

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