New Interdisciplinary Masters Degree from Liberty

Discussion in 'General Distance Learning Discussions' started by b4cz28, Nov 28, 2016.

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  1. b4cz28

    b4cz28 New Member

  2. chrisjm18

    chrisjm18 Well-Known Member

    Technically you couldn't complete it in 1 semester since Liberty's full-time graduate course load is 12 credits.
     
  3. Pugbelly2

    Pugbelly2 Member

    It is always good to see a new offering, especially one with such a generous transfer policy. However, I found the degree options quite limiting. For example, nothing from Business or Management was allowed, except for sports management. I much prefer Amberton's Interdisciplinary grad degree. I believe it's called Professional Development. It is much for flexible.
     
  4. b4cz28

    b4cz28 New Member

    I took five courses this last semester. I'm in their Grad program but perhaps its different for each school? A semester is 16 weeks broken down into two eight week sessions, so you have three one session and two the next. It was in fact brutal with three in eight weeks lol.
     
  5. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

    I have a question about these types of Interdisciplinary programs. I can easily imagine designing a program that would be quite interesting but one of the things that we often discuss is the goal or the utility of specific degree programs. In that regard, how does one typically "use" an Interdisciplinary Masters degree?
     
  6. b4cz28

    b4cz28 New Member

    I would think to gain a raise at work? Allow you to not waste credits in a program you could not finish? Or a stepping stone into a doctoral program. I guess if you had to drop out of a program after a few semesters you could salvage those credits.
     
  7. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly Staff Member

    Qualify for two new teaching disciplines at once?
     
  8. Pugbelly2

    Pugbelly2 Member

    Many job postings require a specific type of degree, but also allow for some type of equivalency. You might see an ad that says, "MBA or other business degree required." If your interdisiplinary degree is heavily weighted toward business and management, it probably checks the box. I might even list the primary discipline on my resume as I do with my associates degree. For example: MA Professional Development (Business).

    Some job postings might even prefer a degree of this kind. For example, one of my clients is a non-profit that works closely with segments of the population that require supportive services such as job training, counseling, etc. When hiring, they might actually like someone with an interdisciplinary degree that emphasizes business, but also has an element of counseling, psychology, HR development, etc. The religous nonprofits may like an interdisplinary degree that touches on business and religion, or management and ministry.

    I agree that these degrees won't work for everyone, but there is definitely a market and a need for the niche.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 29, 2016
  9. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

    All good answers. Thanks.
     
  10. novadar

    novadar Member

    One interesting find on the FAQ PDF (Bold is my emphasis):

    How many credit hours can I transfer into the program?
    A total of 15 graduate credit hours can be transferred in the program and must be evaluated by the Office of Transfer Evaluations. These credit hours can come from graduate coursework or a conferred graduate degree from an accredited institution.

    http://www.liberty.edu/media/1238/mainds/MA%20INDS%20FAQs%20[111716].pdf
     
  11. Paidagogos

    Paidagogos Member

    The one thing I noticed about this program is the course prefixes look good; i.e. communications courses are listed as COMS and English courses are listed as ENGL. This is not the case with every interdisciplinary program. That may not seem like a big deal, but it is extremely important if one desires to teach with said degree one day down the road. This program would pass muster for accrediting agencies and those looking to get their 18 hours to teach in a particular subject (or two for that matter).
     
  12. Bruce

    Bruce Moderator Staff Member

    Texas Christian University used to have a testimonial for their Master of Liberal Arts (my favorite Interdisciplinary/Liberal Arts program) degree from an Air Force officer. He needed A graduate degree for promotion points, and decided to do the MLA at TCU because the unlimited program design & course selections appealed to him.
     
  13. novadar

    novadar Member

    Yes, it is practically impossible to make Field Grade status (Major/Lieutenant Commander) without a Masters degree.
     
  14. airtorn

    airtorn Moderator Staff Member

    Once upon a time, yes. Now that education is masked on their promotion boards (at least Air Force), not so much. I can think of at least one Lt Col-Select in my little squadron who doesn't have a graduate degree.
     
  15. guyfawkes

    guyfawkes Member

    I've seen some really good suggestions here for a few Master's degree programs that are both low in their overall required credits and liberal with the requirements of said credits. Is anyone else familiar with any more 30ish-credit Inter/Multidisciplinary or Liberal Arts Master degree programs?
     
  16. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

    The UNC system has 2 Liberal Arts programs

    UNC Online | Master Degree | All Fields | All Campuses
     
  17. Bruce

    Bruce Moderator Staff Member

    Western New Mexico University - M.A. in Interdisciplinary Studies

    University of Memphis - M.A. in Liberal Studies

    Thomas Edison State University - M.A. in Liberal Studies

    University of South Dakota - M.A. in Interdisciplinary Studies

    Texas Christian University - Master of Liberal Arts

    Arizona State University - Master of Liberal Studies

    Kent State University - Master of Liberal Studies

    If money is no object; Johns Hopkins University - Master of Liberal Arts
     
  18. guyfawkes

    guyfawkes Member

    Great post. It seems that 30 is the lowest amount of credit hours one can expect from an interdisciplinary-type degree, with varying maximum amounts of transfer credit permitted. I've found some 27-credit ones online but they are generally for engineering.
     

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