MiniMBA

Discussion in 'Business and MBA degrees' started by Mac Juli, Nov 15, 2020.

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  1. TEKMAN

    TEKMAN Semper Fi!

    I am getting annoyed with the term "Mini MBA", why's not Certificate in Business Administration
     
    Maniac Craniac, innen_oda and Acolyte like this.
  2. Mac Juli

    Mac Juli Well-Known Member

    Well, the trivial answer is because people are paying for this. My guess is that there are enough people out there who - come hell or high water - want to put the three letters MBA on their resume... but that's just a guess.
     
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  3. smartdegree

    smartdegree Active Member

    I guess it helps with the HR/Recruiter search filters.
     
  4. TEKMAN

    TEKMAN Semper Fi!

    Please let me know when they have MicroMD, NanoMD, or MiniMD. I want to become a Medical Doctor, but a full MD requires too many years in school. :D
     
  5. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    Tell the Med School you want a "Fast-Track" program so you can specialize in athletic injuries. Let me know what they say. :)
     
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  6. Life Long Learning

    Life Long Learning Active Member


    According to Jonathan Kim (born 1984) an American US Navy lieutenant (and former SEAL), physician, and NASA astronaut, the U.S. Army Special Forces Medic (18D) 6-months course was more difficult than his Harvard Medical School.
     
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  7. nomaduser

    nomaduser Active Member

    Jonathan Kim sounds like a Korean name
     
  8. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    Brilliant work, Detective Obvious! :rolleyes:
    From the wiki: "Jonathan Kim was born in Los Angeles in 1984. Kim's parents emigrated from South Korea to the United States in the early 1980s."

    Here: you can read the whole thing. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonny_Kim
    It's an impressive, inspiring story.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2020
  9. TeacherBelgium

    TeacherBelgium Active Member

    Is Kim such a frequent family name in Korea?
     
  10. nomaduser

    nomaduser Active Member

  11. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    Right from the top on down.Family name of last 3 NK leaders: Kim Il Sung, Kim Jong Il and his son, Kim Jong Un. Shouldn't he have been Kim Jong Deux? :) I'm guessing the reason you don't know this is because there aren't nearly as many Korean immigrants and their descendants in Belgium. There are lots here and in US. Many in my town - they own quite a few businesses. Lots of Kims. Here's a bit on Korean names. 20% of South Koreans are surnamed Kim. I doubt it's much different in the North.

    "About 20 percent of South Korea's population of 49.3 million (2015 est.) has the family name Kim. That's about 10 million people. Lee is the second most common name, and Park (or Pak) is the third. All told, about 45 percent of Koreans have one of these three names!" (Britannica)
     
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  12. TeacherBelgium

    TeacherBelgium Active Member

    Honestly I don't even think I ever met someone coming from Korea here in Belgium. Most of the people who immigrate to our country are from India and Morocco.
    I don't even think we have many Chinese immigrants here.
    I had a Chinese girl in my class in high-school and a Chinese guy at the university-college in my class now, but as for the rest I don't think we have many Southeast Asian immigrants here. Most are North-African and from India.
    Canada and Great-Britain have people from literally every nationality so I'm sure that you guys know a lot more about the respective cultures than we.
    My father is also way more knowledgeable about different cultures than me and my mother and brother.
    He says he feels he needs to learn about their cultures because he is an immigrant himself and therefor feels a special bond with them.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2020
  13. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    Well, some of us, perhaps. Not all.
    I hear him loud and clear. Same here.
     
  14. eriehiker

    eriehiker Active Member

    This is the way I feel. My father was born in Belgium in 1938 and came to the United States during the 1950s on this old American troop carrier:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Groote_Beer

    Pretty much everybody in the American Midwest - my region - can trace ancestry back to hard-luck immigrant groups and I find it pretty detestable that people are so willing to cut out current immigrant groups given this history.
     
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  15. TeacherBelgium

    TeacherBelgium Active Member

    Hi fellow partly Belgian :)
    I keep surprising myself how important my little country actually is.
    So many people from Belgium in the US.
    Was he from Wallonia or Flanders?
    I'm from Flanders.
     
  16. eriehiker

    eriehiker Active Member

    My father was born in Wevelgem, West Flanders. That is near Kortrijk.
     
  17. TeacherBelgium

    TeacherBelgium Active Member

    I know it well.
    I'm from Vlaams-Brabant. That is 2 hours driving from West Flanders.
    Do you speak Dutch?
     
  18. eriehiker

    eriehiker Active Member

    It always makes me laugh how self-deprecating actual Belgians in the home country are. There really are a lot of Belgians in the United States, especially in Michigan and Wisconsin. I drive back and forth between these two states frequently.

    I wish that I spoke Dutch. My family had a pretty difficult time of it in Belgium during WWII. My grandmother had two infant sons die during the war - one from bombing and one from pneumonia. She had a nervous breakdown and I kind of figure that the family wanted a fresh start when they came here. So they did not teach Flemish to the next generation. I regret that. I would love to speak it and I plan to eventually learn the language.
     
  19. eriehiker

    eriehiker Active Member

    When I was a child, I could not say the "th" sound. My father can't say that sound because it isn't a natural sound in Dutch/Flemish. I had a speech therapist during grade school as a result. That was just the little bit of Flemish inside of me.
     
  20. TeacherBelgium

    TeacherBelgium Active Member

    For me the '' r '' is a difficult sound in English. My dad is French Canadian and pronouncing the '' r '' is difficult for me in English because of the French influence.
    My mother is Dutch.
    We speak Dutch with my mother at home and French (sometimes English) with my father.
    Dutch is much more difficult to learn than English or French.
    Our grammar is much more complex.
    German has a bit of resemblance.
    German is even more difficult to learn though imho.

    Definitely worth it to learn Dutch :)
     
    Johann likes this.

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