Kind Help-->California InterContinental University

Discussion in 'General Distance Learning Discussions' started by jaiho, Nov 7, 2009.

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  1. jaiho

    jaiho New Member

    All Esteemed Forum Members,

    REGRADS

    I was introspecting the idea of pursuing DBA(Information Systems and Enterprise Resource Management) from California InterContinental Univ. Is it worth investing in the program.

    I want to use degree outside of US, will it help me.

    Actually I have done MS & BS in Computer Science and is just thinking that DBA(ISERM) from California InterContinental may serve as PhD(Computer Science) for me[Due to Cost Issues involved in pursuing PhD(Computer Science)].

    Correct me please,

    regards
     
  2. dl_mba

    dl_mba Member

    California InterContinental Univ is nationally accredited university. There is nothing wrong pursuing a degree from them. You may want to check in ur home contry if a US NA degree is acceptable by your prospective employers.

     
  3. GameTech

    GameTech New Member

    Hi Jaiho,
    CIU is good enough for me. I got BS in CS and MS in Software Engineering from the US's brick and mortar schools before taking a snapshot in online learning. I had completed 18 credits from NCU ( US RA school ) and decided to drop out due to several reasons. CIU accepted 9 credits from my NCU courseworks. I chose CIU based on:

    Time to complete ( can be less than 2.5 yrs)

    Tuition cost ( less than $9,000 with scholarship and course transfers- Anyway my company pay for my tuition).

    Coursework concentration suites to my career technical field (DBA, ISERM)

    Good Luck!
     
  4. morganplus8

    morganplus8 New Member

    I know this is a subjective question, but how would a school like CIU rate in the world? By US standards, it is probably a tier 4? But how would it be received versus the 15,000 or so post secondary schools of the world?

    I want to earn another degree, at the doctoral level but cost and time are factors as I'm doing this for personal reasons and might only consider teaching at the college level where my Masters degree satisfies most academic requirements.

    On a personal note, I wish they would change the name to something else, like, Fidel University or something with a bit of character, "Intercontinental" sounds like a missile or something. JMO
     
  5. Randell1234

    Randell1234 Moderator Staff Member


    If time is a factor, a PhD or DBA might be a bit tough. It does require a committment.
     
  6. RFValve

    RFValve Well-Known Member

    I don't think it can be classified as a tier 4, Nova is tier 4 so CIU probably would be classified as not ranked.

    Most rankings in the world go by the number of publications of faculty members, as CIU probably uses mainly cheap adjunct faculty and probably have no research centres. It is safe to say that it would be in bottom 10%.

    To me a Doctorate from an institution like CIU is almost a vanity degree. Besides the title and extra learning, I cannot think about other reason to get a degree from there.
     
  7. Randell1234

    Randell1234 Moderator Staff Member

    Would all non-RA doctorates be "almost a vanity degree" in your opinion?
     
  8. BillDayson

    BillDayson New Member

    The USNews 'tiers' are for RA schools at the undergraduate level, so I don't think that they are relevant to this California Intercontinental. But if we consider the same kind of variables that USNews emphasizes, things like admissions selectivity, drop-out rates and percentage of faculty who are full-time, I expect that schools like this would show very badly.

    Right. It's probably superior to some of the doubtful things that we find in places like Bangladesh, where there's apparently little or no regulation of private universities. But it doesn't look like it could compete very well with research productive institutions, despite its awarding doctoral degrees.

    I agree. I don't understand hiring in the business field. Maybe it's true that anyone with any accredited business degree will be offered faculty positions, I don't know. Reading some of the posts here on Degreeinfo, it sounds that way. But in other academic subjects in the humanities and sciences, it doesn't work that way. Hiring is typically competitive and employers favor graduates of schools with strengths in the subjects to be taught. If the graduate is being hired for a research position, then significant research experience is going to be required.
     
  9. Dave Wagner

    Dave Wagner Active Member

    Possibly. However, one could also argue that the content of unaccredited or nationally accredited doctorates are useful alone, or the degrees are useful as "certificates" of achievement.
     
  10. Dave Wagner

    Dave Wagner Active Member

    Note that a doctorate in information systems is vastly different from a doctorate in computer science.

    What do you plan to do with the degree? What country? How old are you? Answers to these questions will help answer your question. Thanks.
     
  11. BillDayson

    BillDayson New Member

    I'm not RFValve and don't want to put words into his mouth. But my own answer would be, "Of course not".

    Rockefeller University, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory and Memorial Sloan Kettering are all NY Regent's accredited schools. All three of them are research leaders and include Nobel Prize winners.

    The new doctoral program at the Burnham Institute is a similar animal, despite currently only being California-approved.

    The University of California's Hastings College of Law is ABA-accredited but not RA. There are quite a few very prominent ATS-accredited religious seminaries that aren't RA either. The Christie's auction house in NYC has a very cool in-house NYRegents accredited MA in Modern Art, Conoisseurship and the History of the Art Market.

    My point is that the significant variable here, at the doctoral level particularly, might not be accreditation so much as reputation. If a program is known and respected by professionals in its field, it will probably be competitive. If the program is a nonentity, then it's less likely to be competitive.
     
  12. RFValve

    RFValve Well-Known Member

    I think calling them "vanity" degrees is unfair as I'm sure that many take them because they really want to improve themselves and cannot afford better education. However, I'm calling them "almost" as besides the few ones that want them because they really want to learn something and conduct research in a field that they like, I cannot think of other reason for wanting something that is going to cost money, take some effort that will get you in return something that cannot be used in places where the doctorate is needed such as Faculty positions.

    I might be wrong and a non RA doctorate might have utility so I leave this open for discussion.
     
  13. RFValve

    RFValve Well-Known Member

    I think calling them "vanity" degrees is unfair as I'm sure that many take them because they really want to improve themselves and cannot afford better education. However, I'm calling them "almost" as besides the few ones that want them because they really want to learn something and conduct research in a field that they like, I cannot think of other reason for wanting something that is going to cost money, take some effort that will get you in return something that cannot be used in places where the doctorate is needed such as Faculty positions.

    I might be wrong and a non RA doctorate might have utility so I leave this open for discussion.
     
  14. Randell1234

    Randell1234 Moderator Staff Member


    I was just thinking there is a major difference between an accredited degree that will take work (like Aspen) and one where you send in some money, write a single paper, and get a degree to call yourself doctor. That is what I think of as a vanity degree - pay some bucks and tell people to call you doctor.

    I would think non RA doctorates would have a great value in the corporate world. Most employers want to know if it accredited by a real organization - period. I don't think they get into the RA, NA, AACSB, DETC.....debate. I could be wrong and I am sure some HR people will weight in. I may just call my HR department tomorrow and ask.
     
  15. RFValve

    RFValve Well-Known Member

    Yes, but the same for a doctorate versus an MBA degree. Most employers in Industry can care less if you hold a doctorate in business or an MBA, in the real world it comes down to results rather than "Titles". An MBA from a DETC school can be helpful to land a job in the business world but I don't see why you would need a doctorate but just to call your self a doctor in the office so others can see that you hold a title.

    Unaccredited doctorates have some utility in the alternative medicine field for example. My wife once convinced me to visit a "psychic" doctor that practices psychic healing, the guy had a "doctorate" from a known degree mill but his practice was full, most people would refer to him as a doctor and I'm sure that some thought he was a real one. As the practice of "psychic" medicine is not regulated the guy gets away with this. Needless to say that his cure was useless and total scam, but the guy got 200 dollars richer because of his Dr title.
     
  16. Rich Douglas

    Rich Douglas Well-Known Member

    This would be contrary to the research I did for my doctoral dissertation in 2003, where 278 respondents to a very complicated survey surrounding this question clearly indicated a significantly lower acceptance of degrees from accredted, non-RA schools. It would also be contrary to DETC's own surveys, which clearly demonstrate a bias against DETC-accredited schools when using degrees from such schools to pursue higher educational opportunities.

    There have been many anecdotal observations where degrees from non-RA schools--even those from legitimately accredited schools--were not acceptable. It is essential to note that one's ability to negotiate exceptions to these practices is vital. Also, regarding acceptance, YMMV.
     
  17. jaiho

    jaiho New Member

    Respected Sir Dave Wagner,

    I am currently Faculty in Indian University.I think PhD in Information Systems may work for me.

    I am 33 Years Old.

    Kind Help Solicited

    I want to use Degree in India and Canada.

    My Target is to teach in community college.
     
  18. Dave Wagner

    Dave Wagner Active Member

    You're not too old to finish a doctorate, even if you get held up by a bunch of narcissists who don't understand your research. A DETC-accredited doctorate may help you secure a full-time position for teaching, if you can ascertain whether it will be accepted. Is there any way you can ask whether it will be accepted in your current school or the school at which you hope to teach? That will be the "litmus test" for using the DETC-accredited doctorate in your situation. I imagine that it will be accepted more readily in India (excluding the Indian Institute tier) than in Canada.
     
  19. Rich Douglas

    Rich Douglas Well-Known Member

    I was 43 when I finished at UIU. It launched an important phase of my career. However....

    Earning a doctorate from a DETC-accredited school invites many limitations. I have yet to hear a situation where earning such a degree was a better option than pursuing an RA (or equivalent) doctorate. That includes cost.
     
  20. RFValve

    RFValve Well-Known Member

    I work in a community college in Canada. It is hard to tell if it would work in Canada, my suggestion is to contact WES Canada and see if this degree would be considered equivalent to a Canadian PhD. WES is normally used in Ontario and other places in Canada for hiring purposes.

    Community college hiring is very competitive as you have Unions, it is not really about the degree you have but the skills and the time. I think you would be safer with a PhD from India than a DETC degree, I have seen few people teaching with an Indian degree in Canada but never someone with a DETC degree.
     

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