Free detective courses

Discussion in 'General Distance Learning Discussions' started by Mac Juli, Nov 16, 2020.

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  1. Mac Juli

    Mac Juli Active Member

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  2. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    Love it! But where's the Secret Decoder Ring? :)
     
  3. Dustin

    Dustin Active Member

    As much as an actually free course on private investigation techniques (even for kids) would be neat, they must be located somewhere with very little regulation because Americans could never get away with selling Special Agent badges or claiming to be part of "CIIA"...also the "test" you have to take in order to receive your exclusive merchandise has the answers written into the Javascript source code. Oy vey.
     
  4. Mac Juli

    Mac Juli Active Member

    Ssh, Dustin! Don't give hints!!! :)
     
  5. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    I read the whole manual, Dustin - I like Yiddish, but I think "Oy vey" might be the wrong language, here. Possibly "Muito ruim!" (Portuguese) would do. This comes from Brazil. They have much bigger problems to contend with right now. I'm sure you've heard about them.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2020
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  6. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    Yes they can. Lots of sellers. FBI-looking credentials too. See the link below.

    Even 40 or 50 years ago, you could get them very easily - anything from "Private Detective" to "Special Agent" for about $4. I remember one outfit that sold all kinds of that stuff. They were on Melrose Av. in LA, IIRC. They advertised in the small back pages listings of quite a few popular magazines - Mechanics and DIY type of mags, etc.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=buy+special+agent+badge&oq=buy+special+agent+badge&aqs=chrome..69i57j33i22i29i30l7.6248j0j7
     
  7. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    In any country where you can walk into a store and walk out with an AR-15, this badge and ID stuff is comparatively minor nonsense.... at least I think so.
     
  8. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    They often tell you it's a "movie replica" etc. Makes it legal, I guess. Secret Service, DEA, US Postal Service, anything you want. Looks like better than half the suppliers these days are Chinese - on Wish, Ali Baba etc. Not surprising.

    And here's a CIA Protective Division Special Agent Badge - another "Movie replica." Looks pretty good to me.... https://coinsouvenir.com/products/copy-of-us-fbi-special-operations-division-special-agent-badge-solid-copper-replica-movie-props

    Thr link says FBI. the ad says CIA. I think the ad is right.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2020
  9. Dustin

    Dustin Active Member

    I know in the past you could more easily call yourself a Private Detective or Special Agent and even buy badges that said the same, but nowadays buying the badge with the intent of using it as a private investigator, bounty hunter, etc., is fraught with peril.

    I was thinking of laws like this one:

    Or state laws like this one (emphasis mine):

    Of course intent matters and you can buy prop badges or even money, but it gets dicey if you try to use that badge and get confused for a peace/police officer.
     
  10. AsianStew

    AsianStew Active Member

    Oh dear... You know you've been online for too long when... you read the title as "free elective courses"...
    I was thinking these were free credits for the free elective areas of a degree... haha, *poof, off I go*
     
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  11. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    i think improper use was always fraught with peril, Dustin. My only point was yes - you could DO it - buy the badge or ID easily then and now. What you did with the badge etc. after you got it -- well, beyond a school play or a Halloween party - you could be in almost as much trouble then as now.

    Can I interest you in a set of official Police Dept. handcuffs? :) Riot gear? Nightsticks? I jest of course, but that was all available, to go with a complete patrol officer's uniform, back in the day. Now? I don't know. I wouldn't dare...
     
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  12. Neuhaus

    Neuhaus Well-Known Member

    When I lived in Binghamton, a company I worked for would periodically hire a local PI for workers comp cases. The agency was called the Franklin Bureau of Investigation (it's proprietor having the surname of "Franklin"). Want to take a stab at what their IDs looked like?
     
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  13. Dustin

    Dustin Active Member

    [​IMG]
     
  14. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    I wanted to post a picture of FBI Prune Juice that was sold here in Canada. No dice - gone now. Sorry. :(
     
  15. Acolyte

    Acolyte Member

    25 page pdf. Free.
    Feeling like a P.I. Priceless.
    Impersonating a Peace Officer: $5000 and 2 years in jail.
     
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  16. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    As it should be.
     
  17. Neuhaus

    Neuhaus Well-Known Member

    Don't ask why I am familiar with this...

    In NY, PI's cannot carry metal badges. ID cards only. So whether from here or a perfectly reputable source that is fully legal somewhere else, misdemeanor.

    This also means that PI's from Pennsylvania where the county issues them badges cannot display them in New York. They can cross the border for a case originating in PA that takes them over here, but no flashing badges. Or, more accurately, flashing badges still makes them liable for that misdemeanor charge.
     
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  18. Acolyte

    Acolyte Member

    I'm pretty sure Ohio is the same way. No badges! I know someone who used to be a licensed PI and I thought about it as a side gig for a while a few years ago. I read up on some of the requirements and such.
     

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