eGeneration decline in email manners, respect & clarity

Discussion in 'Online & DL Teaching' started by me again, Jul 1, 2014.

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  1. me again

    me again Active Member

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    Has anyone else noticed a decline in online manners, respect and clarity in email correspondence from students of the eGeneration? Here is a sample:

    The sample student email to the instructor was addressed on a first name basis (and not to Dr. or Prof.) and it was not even signed with a name. Sadly, this appears to be an etrend of the eGeneration.
     
  2. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly

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    Clearly, not everyone in college is prepared for college-level writing.
     
  3. Tireman 44444

    Tireman 44444 Member

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    Goodness me. I get those all the time. I have had students refer me as:

    1. Hey Teach (yes, I am not joking)
    2. Yo Man
    3. Ma'am ( when on my syllabus and the course intro, it clearly states, Mr.)
    4. What's Up
     
  4. me again

    me again Active Member

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    Two or three decades ago, an unbelievable study came stating that only 1 in 4 entering freshman graduated with a Bachelors degree in four years (at 4-year institutions). Today, is it significantly different?

     
  5. 03310151

    03310151 New Member

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    Not surprised at all how this newest generation is turning out. Have you seen their parents?
     
  6. CalDog

    CalDog New Member

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    The latest statistics in the US Dept of Education "Digest of Education Statistics" are for students who started college in 2005:

    - 38.6 % graduated within 4 years
    - 54.3 % graduated within 5 years
    - 58.3 % graduated within 6 years

    The rate has been lower in the past. For example, the 4-year graduation rate for students who started in 1996 was only 33.7 % (about one in three). No earlier data are shown.
     
  7. CalDog

    CalDog New Member

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    As you might expect, graduation rates vary widely, depending on sex, ethnicity, and school type (i.e. public vs. private non-profit vs. for-profit).

    However, the single factor that is associated with the largest differences in graduation rate is: none of these. The most dramatic differences in graduation rate actually appear to be related to school selectivity. The six-year graduation rate for students starting in 2005 is shown below for schools with different levels of admissions selectivity:

    31.4 % - Open admissions
    45.3 % - Accepts 90 percent +
    56.4 % - Accepts 75.0 to 89.9 percent
    60.9 % - Accepts 50.0 to 74.9 percent
    70.0 % - Accepts 25.0 to 49.9 percent
    88.3 % - Accepts less than 25.0 percent

    These differences are much greater than the differences relating to sex, ethnicity, or school type.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2014
  8. me again

    me again Active Member

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    I just let it go without making any sort of correction, but it still irks me. How do you handle it?
     
  9. me again

    me again Active Member

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    Good point. It demonstrates that open admissions does two things. First, it gives many students (who otherwise would not have a chance) an opportunity to go to college -- and many get a degree. Second, it reduces the overall graduation rate. It's opportunity v. graduate rates.

    At 38%, is Arizona State University open admissions?
     
  10. CalDog

    CalDog New Member

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    According to College Navigator, ASU had an 80% admissions rate in Fall 2013.
    So not open admissions.

    Let's assume that the ASU admissions rate was roughly similar in 2005.
    In that case, ASU would fall into the Digest's "Accepts 75.0 to 89.9 percent" category.

    The Digest statistics indicate that schools in this category had an average 6-year graduation rate of 56.4 % for students starting in 2005.
    According to College Navigator, ASU had a 6-year graduation rate of 58% for students starting in 2005.

    So ASU's 6-year graduation rate seems to be pretty much in line with its selectivity.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2014
  11. Tireman 44444

    Tireman 44444 Member

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    I let it go. I have to. I do start the email with:

    Ms. Jones and end it with Mr. Johnson. I always refer to them by their last names.
     
  12. CalDog

    CalDog New Member

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    As these numbers indicate, most full-time undergraduate students fail to graduate within four years, and that statistic shocks a lot of people. However, many of those students don't fall short by very much -- they just need an extra quarter or two to finish up. In reality, most undergraduate students do graduate within five years, which is less shocking.

    So the 4-year graduation rate doesn't tell the whole story. In practice, the 6-year graduation rate is probably the most common benchmark.

    Example: Cal State Long Beach is one of the largest universities in California. For students entering in 2005, the 4-year graduation rate was only 12%, which looks absolutely atrocious. But that's not the whole story, because the 6-year graduation rate for students entering in 2005 was 54%.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2014
  13. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly

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    Hi CalDog, do these figures account for students who leave one institution and complete at another?
     
  14. me again

    me again Active Member

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    Here is my illustrious institution-jumping timeline:
    AA 4 years
    BS 21 years
     
  15. CalDog

    CalDog New Member

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    No, and so the reported graduation rates could be underestimates. As stated by the Dept. of Education:

    Note that the data are compiled by the schools, and submitted to the Dept. of Education. The schools have no way to track students once they've left. Suppose you transfer from School A to School B, and then graduate from School B. Obviously that does happen -- but School B does not notify School A about it. So School A doesn't know that you ultimately graduated, and will not include you in their graduation rate.

    Some schools, but not all, do report a "transfer-out" rate.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2014

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