Ed.D. in Kinesiology

Discussion in 'General Distance Learning Discussions' started by chrisjm18, Jun 24, 2020.

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  1. chrisjm18

    chrisjm18 Well-Known Member

    Concordia University - St. Paul will start offering an Ed.D. in Kinesiology as of Fall 2020
    https://kinesiology.csp.edu/
    Tuition - $615 x 61 credits
     
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  2. Neuhaus

    Neuhaus Well-Known Member

    Given some of the more creative applications of the Ed.D., the Psy.D. and others as of late I'm starting to think higher ed has really gone off the rails.
     
  3. chrisjm18

    chrisjm18 Well-Known Member

    Care to elaborate? I think kinesiology fits into the scope of an Ed.D. I think most, if not all, disciplines, should have a Ph.D. equivalent degree.

    There's only one other school that offers an online Ed.D. in Kinesiology (UNCG). https://kin.uncg.edu/academic-programs/edd-online/
    "Only online Doctor of Education in Kinesiology in the country."

    Well, the only one until the HLC approved Concordia's program.
     
  4. Neuhaus

    Neuhaus Well-Known Member

    Care to elaborate on that point?

    There's already a PhD in Kinesiology...

    An Ed.D., by definition, is a doctorate focused on "education." We've stretched a bit as that has been extended to things like leadership. Here, the coursework is purely kinesiology. The idea seems to be "Well, you can teach with it. And teaching is education. So...EdD!"

    Aside from that, it's also a discipline that could be rolled into physical therapy since the differences tend to be more about treatment modality rather than any meaningful difference in theory.

    It's the same reason I think it's time to abolish the D.O. degree and just make all physicians M.D.'s.
     
  5. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly

    That sounds like a solution in search of a problem. Doubly so in that there is a mild difference, in that American schools of osteopathic medicine often deliberately have more of a holistic wellness emphasis than their counterparts who award MD degrees.
     
  6. AlK11

    AlK11 Active Member

    This is great news. I actually strongly looked at the EdD at UNC-G for the last couple years before deciding the one I'm currently working on. Not only were they the online online doctorate in kinesiology, they were the only only doctorate in any sport science in the US. Nice to see some other options out there.

    I'd also like to add that while there are already PhDs in kinesiology, as has been pointed out there aren't any online. The EdD is also a good name for a doctorate in kinesiology. There are lots of applications out there for this degree out in the marketplace. The EdD makes more sense for a lot of these types of jobs than a research based PhD would. Finally, I think it is a bit of a stretch to claim kinesiology is closely related to physical therapy. I don't see any sense in rolling kinesiology into the DPT degrees and programs.
     
  7. chrisjm18

    chrisjm18 Well-Known Member

    Cal U of PA added a related doctorate maybe a year or so ago - D.H.Sc. in Health Science and Exercise Leadership.

    Were you aware of Concordia University - Chicago's Ph.D. in Leadership – Health & Human Performance? I see that you earned one of your master's degree in this area.
     
  8. AlK11

    AlK11 Active Member

    I was aware of the Concordia Chicago degree. Even though the concentration is in health and human performance, the degree itself is in leadership. It is more geared towards people working in leadership roles rather than working with the material itself. I wasn't aware of the CalU-PA degree, but it doesn't look that interesting to me either. I think UNC-G is still on top of the mountain when it comes to distance learning sports science degrees with Concordia-St. Paul now coming in second.

    Here's a thread I started a few years ago about the topic. Didn't get many responses though. https://www.degreeinfo.com/index.php?threads/online-doctorate-in-some-sort-of-sports-science.52036/#post-508556
     
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  9. Neuhaus

    Neuhaus Well-Known Member

    I disagree.

    For starters, there is no reason why a medical school wanting to be more holistically focused has to award a separate degree. Medical schools can have varying philosophies and variations in their approach provided they meet the basic requirements. The mechanism that currently allows for an allopathic medical school and an osteopathic medical school to both graduate fully qualified physicians is proof of that.

    Aside from consumer confusion, and it does cause quite a bit of confusion among consumers having physicians with DO vs MD, in many states you have two distinct licensing systems. That's both costly and inefficient. States like New York combine it all into one. You get one license. But if you get one license, why both with the different post-nominals?

    Really, the easy solution here would be to make "M.D." a license designation rather than a degree indicator. You're an R.N. whether you have a diploma, an associates, a bachelors, a masters or a doctorate. Because R.N. isn't a degree, it's a license.

    Just make M.D. a license class and you can qualify for it through either medical school.

    Sort of like how one state, I can't recall off the top of my head but it might be Rhode Island, licenses acupuncturists as "Doctor of Acupuncture." That's the license, not the degree. Anyone who qualifies for licensure as an acupuncturist in that state is designated a "Doctor of Acupuncture." We're seeing the same trend with Naprapathy in New Mexico. The license there is for a "Doctor of Naprapathy." Your pretty little certificate from the state says that even if your diploma said something else.

    The two systems grew up side by side because, originally, an osteopath wasn't granted all of the privileges and responsibilities of a physician. Now they are. But it's the only healthcare license where the post-nominal can vary depending on which school you attended.

    Among my other very not-popular healthcare opinions are: Eliminate optometry as a profession and podiatrists with surgical residencies should just be MDs.
     

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