Designing Cyberwar

Discussion in 'General Distance Learning Discussions' started by eriehiker, Nov 2, 2020.

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  1. eriehiker

    eriehiker Active Member

    The Georgetown University Wargaming Society offers some interesting wargaming activities via eventbrite.

    This one is Designing Cyberwar:
    https://www.eventbrite.com/e/designing-cyberwar-tickets-121861939341?aff=ebdssbonlinesearch

    A more interesting sold out event is the Virtual International Crisis Wargame hosted by the Georgetown University Wargaming Society, the Hoover Institution and the US Naval War College:
    https://www.eventbrite.com/e/virtual-international-crisis-war-game-with-naval-war-college-stanford-tickets-121631716739?aff=erelpanelorg

    There are more of these on eventbrite. This might be a way to get to know and understand the people planning future U.S. wars. Fairly intriguing.
     
    TEKMAN likes this.
  2. Asymptote

    Asymptote New Member

    Very cool! Does something like this fall under an e-Sports type category? Is it similar to a Model UN simulation?
     
  3. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    Not a fan of warfare as a recreational activity, sport etc. any more than the real thing. Don't like the sale of military-style toys either. Killing or any imitation of it shouldn't be on the list of play or learning activities for children. War is not something to be glorified or celebrated. "Planning future US wars" doesn't sound very encouraging. I'm sure there will be plenty available without advance planning. The past (and present) would indicate so.

    I like computers. They're marvelous creative machines. Don't enjoy ANY computer games myself but think they're OK. Except war - or other killing games. No use prohibiting them -that would make them even more popular. I'm not sure if they desensitize people to violence or not - I think some may be insensitive to violence from the start. I'm just against violence and all things that promote, exalt or glorify it.

    Yes - people go to war and serve their country bravely. Heroes. Dead heroes, all too many of them. Appreciating their sacrifice is not grounds for enthusiasm about warfare.
    How about "planning" future peace? Making a game of that -- now, that would be something. Glad to see that more universities now have Conflict Resolution and Peace Studies in their curricula. I think that's the way to go.
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2020

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