what comes next?

Discussion in 'General Distance Learning Discussions' started by cookderosa, Sep 4, 2015.

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  1. cookderosa

    cookderosa Resident Chef

    My 9th grade son is working his way through the Alison Diploma in Multimedia. It's a free course, no college credit- though he is receiving high school credit from me.

    Here is the course content:

    COURSE DESCRIPTION
    This free online Diploma in Multimedia Development course covers the skills and techniques needed to create professional-looking videos, visual effects, motion graphics and animations. The course offers a rigorous exploration of key multimedia tools including Adobe Photoshop, Windows Movie Maker, Adobe Flash, Audacity, Director MX and Adobe After Effects.

    The video-based tutorials are delivered in a non-technical and step-by-step manner by the award-winning multimedia teacher Russell Stannard. The Diploma course is ideal for those who want to gain a thorough knowledge and understanding of multimedia development tools and techniques and who want to enhance their career prospects in the process.
    [/INDENT]


    https://alison.com/courses/Diploma-in-Multimedia-Development/content

    So, he is really-really-really loving these classes. I don't know ANYTHING about these topics, this is way outside my comfort zone. So, for those of you that use these kinds of tools in your hobbies or professionally, what would be a nice follow up to this course? This course is only going to take us through the end of September, and I would love to let him dive deeper into it, but I don't know what that looks like. Suggestions? (it doesn't have to be free, but it should be open to teens and preferably self paced)
     
  2. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator Staff Member

    This is what I got on scrum masters

    "A scrum master is the facilitator for a product development team that uses scrum, a rugby analogy for a development methodology that allows a team to self-organize and make changes quickly. The scrum master manages the process for how information is exchanged.

    Although the scrum analogy was first applied to manufacturing in a paper by Hirotaka Takeuchi and Ikujiro Nonaka, the approach is often used in agile software development and other types of project management. In rugby, opposing teams huddle together during a scrum to restart the game. In product development, team members huddle together each morning for a stand-up meeting where they review progress and essentially restart the project. During the daily meetings, which are sometimes called "scrums," the scrum master asks the team members these three questions:

    1. What did you do yesterday?
    2. What will you do today?
    3. Are there any impediments in your way?

    Although the title of scrum master sounds powerful, the scrum master is not the project leader and is not held accountable for outcomes. The team as a whole is responsible for outcomes.

    That does not mean that the job is easy, however. The scrum master is responsible for:

    1. Helping the team to reach consensus for what can be achieved during a specific period of time. (See sprint)
    2. Helping the team to reach consensus during the daily scrum.
    3. Helping the team to stay focused and follow the agreed-upon rules for daily scrums. (See pigs and chickens)
    4. Removing obstacles that are impeding the team's progress.
    5. Protecting the team from outside distractions."

    What is scrum master? - Definition from WhatIs.com

    This is not my thing either but in the adult world this seems related to leadership training or project management.
     
  3. cookderosa

    cookderosa Resident Chef

    Kizmet, I am so completely missing the meaning of this lol???
     
  4. nyvrem

    nyvrem Active Member

    Time to try out some free based HTML courses ~ Followed by a nanadegree from Udacity in programming

    https://www.udacity.com/course/intro-to-programming-nanodegree--nd000

    Follow that up with another Nanodegree in Front End web dev so he can incorporate his multimedia work into his own website

    https://www.udacity.com/course/front-end-web-developer-nanodegree--nd001

    ok it sounds extreme...

    maybe have your kid start learning some basic HTML (and move onto front end web dev later) to keep his options open. He might want to mix his multimedia work with web development in the future. He could use his knowledge to make some pwetty websites ~

    Best Gaming websites | Web Design Inspirations
     
  5. cookderosa

    cookderosa Resident Chef

    thanks! I'll check these out!
     
  6. GeeBee

    GeeBee Member

  7. edowave

    edowave Active Member



    While those applications will teach you the basics, my understanding is the industry standard for multimedia development is the software from Avid - Avid Technology ( like ProTools) and Apple's Final Cut Pro. Perhaps a course the covers how to use these? I'm sure having those skills on a resume will get him a great job or internship at a local TV station.
     
  8. cookderosa

    cookderosa Resident Chef

    That sounds great! I've been doing some digging, looking into degree programs for the purpose of working backward and seeing what can be used at home for foundation stuff- of course if he's like any of my other children, he'll wait until I've got a degree planned out to change his mind. And then we'll repeat the process at least 2 or 3 more times. :) (I know not to obsess but I can't help it)
     
  9. cookderosa

    cookderosa Resident Chef

    Thanks edowave! I'm not sure if he's going to study this in college or not- but he's enjoying it so far, and I'd like to keep throwing things at him that he likes as long as he likes it. I'll look into the Avid Technology stuff- I'm so out of my depth lol
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 15, 2015

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