SHELBOURNE University...is it a fraud?

Discussion in 'General Distance Learning Discussions' started by seamus, Apr 21, 2001.

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  1. seamus

    seamus New Member

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    Is Shelbourne University a fraud? I have an potential employee that claims he has a B.S. and M.S. in Computer Science from this University. HELP! Any info will be helpful.
     
  2. George Brown

    George Brown New Member

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    I suggest you look at the thread called 'Worlds biggest diploma mill brazenly steps it up' by Justin Wells futher down this page. Justin summarises this organisation very well.

    Cheers

    George

    ------------------
    Virtual Universities of Australasia & the World
    www.virtualuniversities.net
    [email protected]
     
  3. porky_pig_jr

    porky_pig_jr New Member

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    Just looked at their web site, out of curiosity. Couldn't find any informations on programs, courses offered, faculty, nothing. This should raise the red flag right away.

    Of course rather elaborate web site with detailed programs/courses information still may be a sham, but the fact that shelbourne appears to operate in a stealth mode makes me think that they are certainly a sham. Well, at least they didn't spend lots of efforts on developing their web site, so may be they pass the savings to their clients.

    Gosh, I would LOVE to have an interview with this perspective employee and tear him/her apart.

    That's all, folks.
     
  4. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Seamus:

    If the job you are offering this potential employee requires a legitimately accredited degree(s), then move on to the next candidate. [​IMG]

    This is no reflection on his/her ability or skill within the field of computer science, but in terms of degree(s), the applicant has failed the academic criteria for the job.

    Russell
     
  5. George Brown

    George Brown New Member

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  6. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Yes indeed, George! Three graduates and no staff according to the website. Now that is quite an accomplishment. It could be that they all taught each other, you know, peer review.

    And my favorite was the 1921 graduate, one Sassy MILLassee. [​IMG]

    Russell
     
  7. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I agree with Russell. I know nothing about this school. However, if the school were a "mill" and the person were trying to obtain employment based on these credentials, that would raise several issues in my mind that I would wish to explore
    (judgement, integrity, common sense)

    North
     
  8. seamus

    seamus New Member

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    So...what would you say exactly to the person if you were interviewing him? Questions? Set up? Tear him apart? What are the laws pertaining to this kind of fraud if the person is already hired with a close friend of mine's company? DETAILS please!
     
  9. Guest

    Guest Guest

    You are asking some questions which are best answered by an expert in Human Resource law. For instance, did your friend's company require an accredited degree or merely a degree. There may be legal issues around wording and understood meaning, etc.

    Regarding tearing the person apart. I would not do that. Personally, I would be polite and respectful. If it is your company's policy that the degrees be accredited by recognized agencies, then I would inform the person of the company policy to check the credentials of those people who have been offered a job. You have to be fair and even handed. The organization I work for has an HR department which screens applications for these issues. After the candidate is chosen, they must then provide an original transcript to the HR department (mailed directly from the college). Foreign credentials must have a recognized foreign credential evlauation.

    North
     
  10. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I agree with North! Tearing the candidate apart is beneficial to no one. Professionalism should be the protocol. If the Shelbourne degrees are the reason for not hiring the individual, then let them know in a professional manner.
     
  11. BillDayson

    BillDayson New Member

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    If it were me making the decision, I would not even interview an applicant claiming degrees from Shelbourne University. I would simply reject the application.

    Shelbourne University's website claims that it is located in Dublin, Ireland. The Irish Higher Education Authority maintains a listing of legitimate higher education institutions in Ireland, and Shelbourne is not on the list:
    http://www.hea.ie/institute/index.htm

    If I wanted to verify that they aren't a legitimate Irish university, I would contact the Irish Department of Education and Science, and ask. Just go to any search engine and look for 'Irish Government' to get contact information.

    If the individual is already employed in a different company, it's a touchier situation. As far as I know, it is not illegal to hire somebody with a phony degree. The company may have had other reasons besides the degree for hiring the person, after all. But hiring such a person could possibly expose the company to legal liability if the employee harms a customer, so it might be a valuable service to inform the company.

    I guess it is up to you whether you want to interfere in what may not be your business and to harm another person's career. There are certainly two sides to it, in my opinion. If the employee is in a position of responsibility where he/she could do serious harm, I probably would discreetly and politely inform the company. But I would research my facts first.
     
  12. porky_pig_jr

    porky_pig_jr New Member

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    There are different ways to tear the person apart. It can be done on a very civilized way.

    I don't think you can say 'Just because this university is a fraud, we are concerned with your personal integrity as well'. What you need is to demonstrate this person inadequacy from purely professional perspective. You need someone who has enough knowledge to grill this perspective employee.

    Furthemore, you can always say that it is not the credentials but simply the fact that perspective empoyee's set of skills doesn't match properly with your needs, and you have some better matches. This is pretty standard way to deny the employment, in a way they can't sue you or something like that.

    In case he already got the employment, someone does need to demonstrate the fact that his effective knowledge is not on MSCS or BSCS level. Probably simply claiming that such and such university is a degree mill may lead you nowhere. It is 'necessary but not sufficient' requirement to expose the fraud.
     
  13. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Except in Oregon!
     

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