Religion Spillover Thread

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussions' started by RAM PhD, Jul 28, 2013.

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  1. Ian Anderson

    Ian Anderson Active Member

    Isaac Newton had to get permission from King Charles II in order to become a fellow at Cambridge

    He was appointed Lucasian Professor of Mathematics in 1669 on Barrow's recommendation. In that day, any fellow of Cambridge or Oxford was required to become an ordained Anglican priest. However, the terms of the Lucasian professorship required that the holder not be active in the church (presumably so as to have more time for science). Newton argued that this should exempt him from the ordination requirement, and Charles II, whose permission was needed, accepted this argument. Thus a conflict between Newton's religious views and Anglican orthodoxy was averted.(from Wikipedia)
     
  2. ebbwvale

    ebbwvale Member

    I think it is important to acknowledge some of the important contributions that religion has made to science and society, particularly scholarship and how important it has been to education:

    Dr. Carl Gustav Jung was heavily influenced by Hinduism in philosophical arguments of the self :
    "Hindu philosophy became an important element in his understanding of the role of symbolism and the life of the unconscious ..." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Jung;

    Islamic scholars developed writing and continued the work of the Greek Philosophers, as well as developed medicine
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Islamic_studies

    Erwin Schrodinger - Quantum Physics - Hinduism - Upanishads - Ajit Vadakayil: SCHRODINGER, THE FATHER OF QUANTUM PHYSICS AND VEDANTA--- - CAPT AJIT VADAKAYIL

    UNESCO noted: Many Asian countries, for example, have followed this line of thinking and have developed modern
    policy discourses on lifelong learning, transforming in the process their own traditional philosophies (e.g., Confucianism, Buddhism) which
    have for centuries promoted continuous learning
    http://www.unesco.org/education/uie/pdf/revisitingLLL.pdf

    One of UNESCO's learning objectives for lifelong learning is cultural tolerance and understanding. This objective would have to be considered inconsistent with bombing and persecution. Education and learning has been transformative in many religious philosophies in both east and west. It may even be considered an important factor in philosophical maturity. The UNESCO objective and link is below:
    "Develop learning indicators for the individual learner’s cross-cultural competencies, among them the ability to examine one’s culture
    from a relativistic point of view; the ability to review one’s cultural weaknesses and strengths objectively and historically; the ability to
    possess a sensitive and empathetic view of cultural differences; and the ability to communicate cross-culturally (through proficiency in at
    least one or two foreign languages)." http://www.unesco.org/education/uie/pdf/revisitingLLL.pdf

    The plethora of schools, colleges, and universities that have their origins in a faith tradition can be discovered by a drive and/or walk around any neighborhood. Religion, education, and science have intrinsic connections that any serious discussion cannot exclude. Reimer -Ross commented in 2003:p.73 on the evolving "interconnectedness of spirituality and the human services" Human Services Education 23. Sociology and Anthropology have religion as a main tent pole in those disciplines as does Archeology.
     
  3. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly Staff Member

    The number of kids killed abroad by American drone strikes is well documented and completely disgraceful. These are not the actions of heroes. That said, this is not something one can blame on "Christians", either. The West and Christianity are not the same thing.
     
  4. airtorn

    airtorn Moderator Staff Member

    I take it that you are making the assumption that article is accurate.

    Faulty reporting is rampant on this topic.

    Edit - However, we are going off topic and this subject could be an entirely separate thread.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 4, 2013
  5. Johann

    Johann Well-Known Member

    Yes. What Ebbwvale said - the whole post. A most cogent and enjoyable read. Thanks! :smile:

    Johann
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 4, 2013
  6. ebbwvale

    ebbwvale Member

    You're welcome!
     

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