Dissertation only PhD

Discussion in 'General Distance Learning Discussions' started by misty_flannigan, Jan 9, 2006.

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  1. misty_flannigan

    misty_flannigan New Member

    Could someone post the links to the threads about this topic? I have searched but cannot find it.

    I am considering a dissertation only PhD in History. There is a topic that interests me and I am in the position to do research.

    Thanks.
     
  2. PhD2B

    PhD2B Dazed and Confused

    Misty,

    Try this link. It provides 15 hits from the DI forum for UNISA and history.
     
  3. Jack Tracey

    Jack Tracey New Member

    Hi Misty - Over the years there have been lots of threads on the topic of dissertation-only Doctoral programs. They are offered by British, Australian and South African Universities. With just a few exceptions these are not DL degrees (at least not strictly speaking) as there tends to be requirements or at least expectations that you visit the campus periodically to meet with your advisor, attend seminars, etc. The degrees offered by UNISA are DL degrees and so you might want to check out the History Department there. I would also suggest that you look at the offerings at Charles Sturt University as many of their degrees are available through DL. As for History programs, you might take a look at this thread
    http://forums.degreeinfo.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=19182
    It's primarily concerned with Masters degree programs but you might get some clues to help you on your way.
    Jack
     
  4. Ted Heiks

    Ted Heiks Moderator and Distinguished Senior Member Staff Member

  5. Ted Heiks

    Ted Heiks Moderator and Distinguished Senior Member Staff Member

  6. Ted Heiks

    Ted Heiks Moderator and Distinguished Senior Member Staff Member

    The dissertation-only doctorate is considered the way they do things in the UK and other countries that have been influenced by the UK system (Australia, India, Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa, etc.); it is not non-traditional to them. Thus, when contacting them, do not ask about "dissertation-only" doctorates or "distance-learning" doctorates; rather, ask about "part-time" doctorates. It's just a matter of ettiquette to show that you "speak their lingo," so to speak. Also, expect to have to make some in-person visits to campus to see your advisor.

    BTW- What aspect of history interests you the most?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 9, 2006
  7. Ted Heiks

    Ted Heiks Moderator and Distinguished Senior Member Staff Member

  8. PhD2B

    PhD2B Dazed and Confused

    Ted, I love your knack for overkill. :D

    Keep up the good work.
     
  9. Tireman44

    Tireman44 member

    Misty,

    What will be your area of specialization?
     
  10. Ted Heiks

    Ted Heiks Moderator and Distinguished Senior Member Staff Member

    Me? Overkill? :D
     
  11. misty_flannigan

    misty_flannigan New Member

    Hi,

    I have a BA in History, MA in Education, but I would like to earn a PhD in History.
     
  12. Tireman44

    Tireman44 member

    What part? New Deal. 20 th Century. Colonial. European. That is what I was asking.
     
  13. GTAProf

    GTAProf New Member

    UNISA Doctorate

    Is there any up-to-date information on the timeliness of UNISA's responses and length to complete a doctorate? I am considering UNISA but I am put off by the absence of timely responses to simple questions experienced thus far. (I am making reasonable allowances for the World Cup.)
     
  14. It is possible to study a Ph.D at some of the Australian universities by distance . As has been said already, there would probably be a requirement to attend some seminars or meetings. The University of New England (UNE)certainly allows off campus students into Ph.Ds. I am studying for a Master of History by distance education from there. I will post a link which might be useful in a few minutes.
     
  15. distancedoc2007

    distancedoc2007 New Member

    There are 2 broad phases to the UNISA doctoral experience: when you are still on the outside, and when you are admitted to a specific doctorate. They are very different.

    In the first phase, you are one of 300,000+ students that a fairly thin admin staff is trying to handle - and generally doing a good job. For this stage, I recommend patience and using services like IACI. Shouting louder and more frequently at this stage doesn't help.

    Once you are admitted, you then belong to a much smaller department with a smaller pool of students, and a more responsive admin staff. Once you are rolling on your dissertation, all the correspondence will be with your supervisor(s). In my case, I can't think of a time I didn't hear back by email within days, hours even.

    So in the end it's worth waiting out the long admission process; the journey from there on is quite exhilarating!
     

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