Constitutional Law (video)

Discussion in 'Online & DL Teaching' started by me again, Sep 5, 2014.

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  1. me again

    me again Active Member

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    Here is an interesting video to show in a CJ class to discuss Constitutional rights regarding:
    - forced entry into a home
    - search warrants
    - arrest warrants
    - hot pursuit
    - etc.

    Youtube: This guy shutdown the police - YouTube :cop:
     
  2. sideman

    sideman Member

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    Interesting video. Also brings up right to privacy issues as well.
     
  3. me again

    me again Active Member

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    Cellphone videos are a game changer. Both ways.
     
  4. Maniac Craniac

    Maniac Craniac Moderator

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    punoɹɐ ƃuıƃuɐɥ ʇsnɾ
    It WOULD be nice if the police didn't throw their weight around as they tried to do in this video. I think the resident needs some compassion as well, as the police, even if they did try to overstep their boundaries with him, were only trying to do their jobs in investigating a bad situation. I wonder how that exchange would have went down if the resident explained in a calm, non-defensive manner that he was uninterested in waiving his rights. Would the police have gotten that aggressive with him? Maybe they would have, but we'll never know. Ultimately, they DID do the right thing and went on their way instead of escalating it into something physical, which I've seen on way too many videos where the police get offended. What if the camera wasn't there? Again, we'll never know.

    If it isn't already happening, maybe there should be some more training on how the police should respond to someone who can not be tricked into giving up his or her rights. It should be common sense that if someone asks to be presented with a warrant or does not consent to a search that that does not in any way indicate probable cause for suspicion nor warrant an escalation of the aggression of police response. Too bad, all too often, police just don't understand that.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 13, 2014
  5. me again

    me again Active Member

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    The officers pretty much told the homeowner that they were going to drag his ass out into the street and arrest him if he didn't... oops... then they realized that they were being filmed and their behavior suddenly changed. Camera-phones are a game changer (both ways).

    Cameras are very good because it puts officers and citizens on notice. Both must act legally. And if they don't, then the videotaped evidence may be used against them. Cameras are awesome because it discredits the testimony of liars.

    Law enforcement receives appropriate training, but on some police agencies, the thin blue line allows the practice of "the end justifies the means," even if it means looking the other way and claiming no knowledge of it. When the cameras are recording, they completely remove that discretionary indifference on the part of officers. Ultimately, cameras will strengthen the Constitutional rights of Americans.
     
  6. Maniac Craniac

    Maniac Craniac Moderator

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    Hard to deny that one. Along with video comes accountability for one's actions. I can dig it. I don't know the numbers off the top of my head, but now has to be a great time for the availability and affordability of the technology.
     

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