Almost All Terriorists are Muslim

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussions' started by adamsmith, Sep 13, 2004.

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  1. adamsmith

    adamsmith member

    In a striking statement by Abdel Rahman al-Rashed, the general manager of the satellite television station, Al-Arabiya, he said that: "It is a certain fact that not all Muslims are terrorists, but it is equally certain and exceptionally painful that almost all terrorists are Muslim".

    Why is this?
     
  2. BillDayson

    BillDayson New Member

    I'm not sure that I agree.

    The Irish Republican Army has been fond of setting off car-bombs, but a segment of American opinion considers them 'freedom fighters' because of ethnic identifications.

    Probably the most active terrorist organization in recent years hasn't been al-Quaida, it has been the Tamil Tigers in Sri Lanka, a group of Hindu terrorists.

    I do think that Islam has been unusually fecund in recent years in giving birth to terrorists. And perhaps more to the point, these Islamic terrorists have targeted us, instead of enemies that many of us don't care very much about.

    If one African group targets another, we shake our heads. If somebody targets Israel, we get morally indignant. If somebody kills thousands of Americans, serious butt is kicked.

    It isn't so much that they are terrorists, but they are terrorists who mess with us and ours.

    Why has Islam been producing so many terrorists?

    I'd guess that it's mostly a response to the process of globalization. It's a reaction to what's perceived (probably correctly) as a loss of cultural distinctiveness. It's a rejection of cultural values and ways of life that many Muslims feel are both depraved and alien, imposed on them by the ever-present media and products of the West.

    Islam finds it very hard to cope with the loss of their distinctiveness and with the prospect of their assimilation by the kaffirs, because they believe themselves to be the custodians of God's revelation of how human life is to be ordered.

    So to embrace the new secular/sensual ways flooding in over the media is not only a humiliating loss of all those things that they feel to be most distinctively theirs, it's tantamount to turning their back on God himself. It hurts.

    What hurts worst is the fact that the lifestyle of the West is so damn desirable. They want to share the lives that we lead and they hate themselves, and us, because they do.

    I imagine that helps explain the paradox of Muslims that move to the US or to Europe, then gravitate to radical mosques that preach violence against the societies that attracted them.
     
  3. Ian Anderson

    Ian Anderson Active Member

    Re: Re: Almost All Terriorists are Muslim


    I agree. There are also insugencies in Spain, Nepal (Maoists), Rwanda/Burundi, liberis, Columbia (FARC rebels)(did you know we have troops in Columbia protecting oil pipe lines?) and several more non-muslim countries.

    But while most of the non-muslim wars are internal or local wars, the muslims terrorists are spreading their attacks to distant lands (Spain, USA, Kenya for example).
     
  4. Bruce

    Bruce Moderator Staff Member

    Almost immediately after 9/11/01, Boston talk radio host Jay Severin made this statement;

    "Not all Muslims are terrorists, but so far, all the terrorists who have attacked the US have been Muslim".

    It's hard to argue with that logic. I realize that the great majority of Muslims are not terrorists, but when all the terrorists belong to a certain ethnic/religious group, that's something you really have to take into consideration, political correctness be damned.

    If the US were suddenly threatened by a group of terrorists comprised of white, Scottish, Protestant males, I certainly would understand & accept being "profiled". It's just common sense.

    Let's be honest here.....you're getting ready to board a flight, and you notice a group of about 6 or so Middle Eastern males waiting for the same flight. Would you board the plane?

    I wouldn't.
     
  5. adamsmith

    adamsmith member

    These days, when travelling overseas, I always fly on an "Islamic' airline!
     
  6. adireynolds

    adireynolds New Member

    The complete column can be found here. It's an interesting read:

    http://www.arabnews.com/9-11/?article=32&part=2
     
  7. Felipe C. Abala

    Felipe C. Abala New Member

    Re: Re: Almost All Terriorists are Muslim

    I like this part of that article:
    I remember a time when SMS messages were being sent to, I think, all muslims in Abu Dhabi (or UAE) requesting them not to buy any American products. A fellow (of course muslim) opened up the subject in a gathering and told the guys about the SMS with the purpose of reminding them to obey that message. The same guy was himself wearing a big "I Love NY" printed at the back of his T-shirt...

    Silly really...
     
  8. Felipe C. Abala

    Felipe C. Abala New Member

    In fairness to the Muslims on the board, I myself am a Muslim. From being a Christian (protestant) to being a Muslim, because I was convinced of what I’ve read and learned. Unfortunately, I have been convinced only of what I’ve read, but never of what’ve seen (and experienced with people who wear Islam on their foreheads).

    One thing I’m sure of is, I don’t look at people (or judge them) on the basis of my personal belief (religious faith). Let God be the Judge, not me (a religious fanatic - whatever my religion might be), is my philosophy.

    I work in a multicultural environment, comprising of people of different cultural backgrounds, and most of them Muslims. Diversity (mostly religion) has always been an issue. I often hear and see people (even educated ones – some are US or UK degree holders unfortunately) murmur about someone with no justifiable reason and in most instances only on religious grounds. Name-calling, such as “bangali”, “hindi”, “patan” and so on, is also a common practice. We all know that such attitude develops mistrust and misunderstanding and a lot of negative possibilities. But yet such things are left unchecked by those who profess religion, at least on a personal level.

    With a lot of diplomacy, I have quite a number of times called a staff (those within my team who inadvertently do the same practice), to discuss diversity in a multicultural environment. My intention is not to lecture on the subject, as I am not an expert on that field, but rather, remind my staff of the negative impact this kind of attitude might bring.

    Of all these many instances (that I have called them), the very root cause of such attitude, as revealed from a one-on-one discussion, is the lack of training on that area of knowledge at their young age and the lack of further training as an adult. Yet, all of these guys are having reputable degrees.

    Quite often, I remind them that being educated or being “professional” is not just by having our CVs full of degrees or diplomas nailed on the walls or being addressed an “Engineer” (as a common practice here in UAE – anyone who knows how to fix an A/C is an “engineer”). And the worst is, I have to mention that being religious is not just by going to the “Mosque” five times a day, wearing beard & mustache, and having long clothes. Rather, a professional or being religious is to make a commitment to uphold, to the greatest extent, the fundamental human rights & dignity, and respect diversity in a multicultural environment - sort of social responsibility.

    As a Muslim, I definitely have nothing against Islam and its tenets (whatever it is). But as social being (created by the same Creator who created all things that exist – Jews, Christians, Muslims, Hindus, Buddhists, and anything that we can think of), I would rather think long and hard of my role in the society and act upon what is “universally” fair and just to contribute in the fulfillment of ideals of, at least, the current generation - let alone the generations to come.

    Of course, anyone is free to disagree with this philosophy… but as for me, that’s my personal perspective.

    P.S. A quick search of "Mohammed Faisal C. Abala" at googles or Yahoo, you'll find proof of my Muslim affiliation.

    Kind regards... and Salam to all Muslims on the board.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 13, 2004
  9. Ian Anderson

    Ian Anderson Active Member

    What about EgyptAir flight 990 back in Oct 1999? (In retrospect could this have been an attempt to use the aircraft as a weapon with the scheme being thwarted by the co-pilot?)

    I fly US or UK airlines whenever possible. There are more scary practices to worry about on some foreign airlines than terrorists. Being in the aerospace business I keep tabs on many of the reported airliner accidents or incidents. (Of course there are problems with US airlines occasionally - just a few weeks ago a domestic carrier landed at an air force base by mistake-- what if the base was on alert with missiles at the ready?)
     
  10. Tom Head

    Tom Head New Member

    Thanks for this, Felipe. I've been moderating this discussion very closely, and happy that nobody has gone into the whole "the Muslims do this," "the Muslims do that" tack. I think it's important for folks to remember that while the majority of terrorists targeting the United States are indeed probably Muslims, an infinitessimally larger and more significant majority of Muslims are not terrorists targeting the United States.


    Cheers,
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 13, 2004
  11. nosborne48

    nosborne48 Well-Known Member

    Christian Arabs

    Interesting topic. Personally, I still do not understand why the administration took little action to restrict Saudis travelling here when it restricted virtually every other Arab group. All but what, two? of the 9/11 terrorists were Saudis, after all. And that's apparently where the money came from and maybe still comes from...

    Anyway.

    Where are the Christian Arabs? Where do they side? Half of Israeli Arabs are Christians; Lebanon ditto, there are substantial Christian Arab populations throughout the Arab world. Are they caught in the middle?
     
  12. Kit

    Kit New Member


    Not so much caught in the middle as facing their own discrimination issues. Not everyone enjoys the freedoms of religion and expression that are found in western countries and many Asian countries. Christians in Arab countries run by Islamic law are openly and officially discriminated against.

    In Saudi Arabia it is illegal to openly display symbols of any religion other than Islam. This applies not only to residents but also to travelers. If you travel to Saudi Arabia and have a Bible in your possession it will be confiscated at the airport and returned to you only when you are leaving. Open practice of any religion other than Islam is strictly prohibited. Citizens and travelers alike may not wear crosses. Christian women, including visitors, must pratice Islamic dress codes. If you speak to any Saudi Muslim about Christianity you may well find yourself arrested for trying to 'convert' a Muslim. All of the above is also true in Iran.

    In Pakistan Christians are restricted in where they can live, most confined to ghettos. It is extremely difficult for Christians to obtain an education. Even those who manage are still only hired for the dirtiest and most menial jobs. Pakistani Christian children are often taunted by their Muslim neighbors and asked "When is your family going to convert?" In Sudan and Nigeria Christians are being slaughtered by those within those countries who want their governments changed to Islamic law for everyone, whether or not they are actually Muslim.

    Strangely enough, there is nothing in Islam that justifies any of these actions. Mohammed himself stated that "There is no coercion in religion", but in countries run by Islamic law that non-coercion is not practiced by those in power. Christians living in those countries dare not openly voice any opinions that could be construed as anti-Islamic.

    Kit
     
  13. Tom Head

    Tom Head New Member

    That should read "monitoring"; I gave up moderating Degreeinfo discussions years ago, though (and this may surprise folks) I don't think Bruce and I ever disagreed about what to do with a thread.


    Cheers,
     
  14. Ian Anderson

    Ian Anderson Active Member

    This is tangent to the thread but about eighteen years ago I flew from Amsterdam to Abou Dhabi on KLM. Because there was an intermediate stop in Saudi Arabia we had to fly on a 747 that had a modified KLM logo with the cross on the crown deleted.
     
  15. adireynolds

    adireynolds New Member

    Which makes walking into a fabric store in a traditional souq (market) in Riyadh, finding bolts of fabric with menorrahs and "Happy Hannakah" in English patterned into the fabric, all that much more funny! In KSA, Star of David = Jews. Beyond that, most Saudis don't have a clue, in terms of Jewish symbolism.

    Of course, when you travel into KSA, you must declare a religion to gain entrance. Most people claim Christian, regardless if they're really such, agnostic, Hindu, etc. etc. I knew a Baha'i once who used to just that.
     
  16. adamsmith

    adamsmith member

    I was actually referrring to the major Islamic airlines, like MAS (Malaysian), not the 'doubtfuls'.
     
  17. adamsmith

    adamsmith member

    Quite often, I remind them that being educated or being “professional” is not just by having our CVs full of degrees or diplomas nailed on the walls or being addressed an “Engineer” (as a common practice here in UAE – anyone who knows how to fix an A/C is an “engineer”). And the worst is, I have to mention that being religious is not just by going to the “Mosque” five times a day, wearing beard & mustache, and having long clothes. Rather, a professional or being religious is to make a commitment to uphold, to the greatest extent, the fundamental human rights & dignity, and respect diversity in a multicultural environment - sort of social responsibility.

    As a Muslim, I definitely have nothing against Islam and its tenets (whatever it is). But as social being (created by the same Creator who created all things that exist – Jews, Christians, Muslims, Hindus, Buddhists, and anything that we can think of), I would rather think long and hard of my role in the society and act upon what is “universally” fair and just to contribute in the fulfillment of ideals of, at least, the current generation - let alone the generations to come.


    Thank you, Philip, for this most throughtful contribution. I think that we would all possibly like to see the same sorts of sentiments expressed, say, by a fundamentalist Christian, or Hindu, or Buddist.

    When I started this thread, I was interested to see just what members thought about this whole issue of world terorism and the overwhelming involvement of those of the Muslim faith.

    I was curious to see whether any would point to their Old Testament moral values where an 'eye for an eye' or the God-insprired destruction of cities and peoples, including women and children were the norm.

    Or whether the Muslim world are the perceived 'victims' of some sort of Western domination;economically, socially and culturally.

    What did interest me about the article was that the critic was a Muslim, engaging in some rather serious self criticism of his faith and his people.

    It has often been said that the West are the greatest critics of themselves, and this is one reason why their societies, despite all their shortcomings, have moved on. Recognition of the shortcomings in our society, and open and healthy debate is one of the principal means of reaching consensus and initiating change.

    However, some societies, including many Islamic countries, are not allowed to engaged in such forms of open criticism, mainly due to their governments seeing this form of debate as undermining the principles of their respective societies and creating dissent or disunity.

    I often wonder whether there is an underlying frustration in many Muslim countries about the lack of debate and opportunity to change their OWN societies that has resulted in a mass lashing out at those societies where debate is permissable and change and differences are permissable, even encouraged.
     

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