The Shanghai Index

Discussion in 'General Distance Learning Discussions' started by Kizmet, Sep 28, 2017.

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  1. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator

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  2. sanantone

    sanantone Active Member

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    This article is so stupid. Looking at the ranking criteria, I knew the rankings would be largely the same and they are.
     
  3. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator

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    Hyperbolic headlines?!? FAKE NEWS!!!
     
  4. heirophant

    heirophant Member

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    I like the Shanghai rankings a lot more than US News. But that's not saying much.

    Giving 30% weight to Nobel prizes and Fields medals will kind of select out the 'usual suspect' universities. 20% weight to publications in Nature and Science probably gives undue weight to those two publications. 40% to the citation indices helps balance that, but ends up giving 60% weight to citations.

    So again, the Shanghai rankings don't seem to even address quality of taught classroom education. The rankings are all about research productivity and impact. I'd suggest that high impact research probably does correlate pretty well with educational quality at the doctoral/research level, but it's still a very indirect measure.

    And obviously, these criteria emphasize math and natural science almost exclusively. Without those subjects, you lose 50% of what is being weighed (Nobels, Fields medals, Nature and Science.) And I'd guess that the citation rankings (another 40%) are science-centric too.

    So if a university isn't a scientific research institution, it's gong to fall very far down these particular rankings.

    That's why, once again, I favor subject-specific rankings. The only one I'm familliar with is the Philosophical Gourmet Report. (Which polls prominent philosophers about perceived faculty strength at other universities.) Even this one indirectly favors research productivity over classroom teaching, but it gives prospective doctoral students a much better picture of which universities are strong in which research areas.
     

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