Library and Information Science degree Online

Discussion in 'General Distance Learning Discussions' started by Marie_23, Feb 25, 2010.

Loading...
  1. Marie_23

    Marie_23 New Member

    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm looking for a accredited program in M.L.I.S. a Library and Information Science degree. But, I need one that does not require the GRE and GMAT for admission. Right, now I'm enrolled in a Masters program that I no longer like and wish to switch majors. I'm wondering if there is a M.L.I.S. program that will waive the GRE and GMAT in lieu of me having completed a year of work at the masters level.
     
  2. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator

    Messages:
    15,150
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    welding engineer-welding inspector
    Location:
    between the devil and the deep blue sea
  3. emmzee

    emmzee New Member

    Messages:
    902
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    I have two: I run several websites, and also am em
    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
  4. SteveFoerster

    SteveFoerster Resident Gadfly

    Messages:
    10,946
    Likes Received:
    6
    Occupation:
    This and that on the Internet
    Location:
    Northern Virginia & Dominica, West Indies
    Why?

    -=Steve=-
     
  5. bazonkers

    bazonkers New Member

    Messages:
    822
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
  6. airtorn

    airtorn Moderator

    Messages:
    2,188
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Las Vegas
  7. scaredrain

    scaredrain Member

    Messages:
    312
    Likes Received:
    0
    Drexel has a MLS that will allow standardized tests to be waived:
    http://www.drexel.com/online-degrees/information-sciences-degrees/ms-di/admissions.aspx

    Here is the link to ALA's list of accredited MLS programs:
    http://www.ala.org/ala/educationcareers/education/accreditedprograms/directory/index.cfm
     
  8. TonyM

    TonyM New Member

    Messages:
    429
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Police Officer
    Location:
    Atlanta
    Are librarians becoming obsolete?

    Since we're on the topic of MLS programs, I'm wondering if the library field is alive and well or on its way out? The Dept. of Labor and the ALA both say that the future looks good, but my intuition tells me that as databases get better and users become more skilled they will not need librarians much. I know that when I started my undergraduate degree way back when, people stood in line to get to the librarian on duty. At one time it was real work to gather enough sources for the average undergraduate paper. These days, my simple pdf reader's search function makes short work of 100s of journal articles. JSTOR and EBSCOhost alone return many hits on even the most esoteric topic. I'd like to think it's like the proponents say, and librarians will be more important with more information. I've thought of becoming a college librarian, but have worried about the longterm status of the field. Does anyone have an opinion?
     
  9. bazonkers

    bazonkers New Member

    Messages:
    822
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    I think like most careers, it's going to be a struggle. Library schools crank out way more librarians than there are jobs. That said, there will be a need for librarians that have these new technical skills that older librarians that were hired years ago don't have. If you don't leave library school understanding databases, online searching, etc. you are at a huge disadvantage. There will always be a need for librarians but it's not a great career field to pursue if you want a guaranteed job for many years. In fact, I can't think of many jobs that offer guaranteed long term stability anymore except maybe a plumber or electrician. :(

    In addition, having only library skills is also a disadvantage. If you leave library school with an additional subject masters or have lots of real work industry experience, especially in the tech industry, you might have a better advantage when searching for work.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 26, 2010
  10. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator

    Messages:
    15,150
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    welding engineer-welding inspector
    Location:
    between the devil and the deep blue sea
    As I understand it, there are a lot of corporations employing librarians as "knowledge managers." These companies have huge archives of data that employees need to access. A related course of study might this sort of program; a Masters degree in Data Mining.

    http://web.ccsu.edu/datamining/master.html
     
  11. bazonkers

    bazonkers New Member

    Messages:
    822
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    Do you need an ALA degree to operate a "biblioburro"?

    http://www.cnn.com/2010/LIVING/02/25/cnnheroes.soriano/index.html?hpt=C1

    "Soriano, 38, is a primary school teacher who spends his free time operating a "biblioburro," a mobile library on donkeys that offers reading education for hundreds of children living in what he describes as "abandoned regions" in the Colombian state of Magdalena."
     
  12. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator

    Messages:
    15,150
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    welding engineer-welding inspector
    Location:
    between the devil and the deep blue sea
    I don't know that the ALA extends it's accreditation into South America. ;)
     
  13. japhy4529

    japhy4529 House Bassist

    Messages:
    1,772
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    System Administrator
    Location:
    Philadelphia, PA

    With respect to Knowledge Managment, the following offering from Kent State might also be of interest: http://iakm.kent.edu/programs/online-options/

    In addition to the MS in KM, Kent State also offers a combined MS in KM and MLIS (this information is provided in the above link).
     
  14. emmzee

    emmzee New Member

    Messages:
    902
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    I have two: I run several websites, and also am em
    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
    CCSU also offers a grad certificate in data mining (see the same link above) ... 5 courses and less stats/math intensive than the MSc, it seems like that would be a great compliment to a library science degree, especially if a person's degree didn't have much of a tech focus.
     
  15. bazonkers

    bazonkers New Member

    Messages:
    822
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    Just remember that the ALA Library Science degree is the "union card" to get a job as a librarian in a library, regardless of whatever other degrees or experience you might have.
     
  16. Marie_23

    Marie_23 New Member

    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0
    Sorry...to everybody who responded to this thread...lol
    Yesterday, when I post the original one I accidentally hit this one twice I think...:eek:

    Does anybody know how to delete this thread? :confused:

    Once again sorry...
     
  17. Marie_23

    Marie_23 New Member

    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0
  18. bazonkers

    bazonkers New Member

    Messages:
    822
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    I'd leave both, there is some good info in here as well as the other thread.
     
  19. Marie_23

    Marie_23 New Member

    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0
    Okay, I hope it helps out any guest visiting this site. :)

    Pay no attention to delayed post that follows this one.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 26, 2010
  20. scaredrain

    scaredrain Member

    Messages:
    312
    Likes Received:
    0
    Depends where you are. There are plenty of places in NC that will hire a librarian without an ALA accredited degree and having an ALA accredited MLS is not required for any school district in NC, when applying to become a school librarian.
     

Share This Page