Easiest PhD program to get into

Discussion in 'General Distance Learning Discussions' started by vanadoo, Jan 16, 2009.

Loading...
  1. vanadoo

    vanadoo New Member

    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    0
    Out of curiosity, what is the easiest RA D/L doctoral program to gain acceptance into? For example, no language requirement, no GRE, no letters of reference, no essay, etc.
     
  2. TEKMAN

    TEKMAN Semper Fi!

    Messages:
    3,693
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Cybersecurity and Information Security Consulting
    Location:
    Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas
    What do you mean "No language requirement?"
     
  3. Bruce

    Bruce Moderator

    Messages:
    9,581
    Likes Received:
    3
    Occupation:
    Police Officer/Adjunct College Instructor
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    Some Ph.D. programs require you demonstrate proficiency in a language other than your native tongue.
     
  4. Anthony Pina

    Anthony Pina New Member

    Messages:
    2,967
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    University Administrator
    Location:
    Kentucky, USA
    I am not aware of any legitimate doctoral program (DL or not) that would not require one or more of the items listed (although foreign language proficiency is becoming a less common requirement).
     
  5. RFValve

    RFValve Active Member

    Messages:
    4,356
    Likes Received:
    1
    Occupation:
    professor
    I don't if it is still the case, but I got acceptance within a day for a PhD program at Touro International University with only an online application and 100 dollars. No GPA, language, transcript, (TOEFL), research proposal, letters of reference but a credit card.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 17, 2009
  6. gonenomad

    gonenomad New Member

    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    0
    Getting in is not the challenge. It is the ability to persist through the program that is the challenge. I remember being astonished by how many doc students I started my program with. To date many of them still don't have a doctorate.

    Aslo, you didn't say what field you want to get a doctorate in. Education, Business, Information Systems?????

    My inclination would be to look at the for profit institutions. They are usually happy to take people's money. I have colleagues with degrees from Walden and Capella. They are very pleased with their degrees.
     
  7. RFValve

    RFValve Active Member

    Messages:
    4,356
    Likes Received:
    1
    Occupation:
    professor
    The reason why is so difficult to gain acceptance into traditional PhD programs is mainly because it is normally expected that the University would provide with financial support so the University wants the best it can get for its money. When applying to online for profit schools, the more students the school gets the better.
     
  8. bazonkers

    bazonkers New Member

    Messages:
    822
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    What if one were to apply to a traditional program and tell them that you would be ok without financial assistance? Would that increase your chance of being accepted?
     
  9. gonenomad

    gonenomad New Member

    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    0
    When I was shopping for doc programs I applied to two programs. Both accepted me; however, only one offered money. On most applications I have seen you have an option of selecting whether you are looking for an assistantship/fellowship. My opinion is that you should always select yes to this question. You can always turn the money down depending upon what strings are attached; however, if you select no then they may never offer you money. At the institutions that I have been associated with the folks who make the decision about acceptance are not always the same folks that make the decision about funding. So, to answer your question I am not sure if that would make a big difference with regard to acceptance.

    Why not apply and see if they accept you?
     
  10. Woho

    Woho New Member

    Messages:
    402
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can anyone share his experience about getting into UK thesis-only PHD programs or AUS PHDs?
     
  11. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator

    Messages:
    15,150
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    welding engineer-welding inspector
    Location:
    between the devil and the deep blue sea
    Please tell me if I'm wrong but my understanding is that most students in full time B&M doctoral programs are "given money" in return for their labors as teaching assistants, research assistants, etc. The money is not actually "given" it is earned. This allows people to barely survive without any other income. There may be cases where people are actually given some sort of scholarship that doesn't have strings attached but for the most part, if you are given money by the university then you'll be expected to do something in return (teach undergrad classes, grade papers, etc.)
     
  12. gonenomad

    gonenomad New Member

    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    0
    In my doc program only about half of the students had some sort of funding. There were a few part time students that were working their way through the program. However, a surprising number of full-time students also had full time jobs. Several were high school teachers by day and doc students by night/weekend/summer. There were also a few community college professors doing the same thing. I currently teach at a community college and can say that there I have several colleagues that are currently doing just this.

    I suspect that the ratio of funded to un-funded doc students varies by institution and field. In my field of education I can see how one would argue that there are more un-funded doc students than in other fields.

    Most of my financial assistance came in the form of assistantships where I did have to "earn" my money. I taught classes, graded papers, stared through microscopes, carried heavy equipment into the mountains, skied across glaciers, and more. However, I had a fellowship from the NSF during my doctorate that paid very well. This fellowship meant I didn't have to teach any classes. The strings attached to this money stipulated that my research have a conncetion between science and education. I was getting a doctorate in science education so this was not an issue. The fellowship was really usefull while I was writing my dissertation as I was able to focus solely upon my writing.
     
  13. RFValve

    RFValve Active Member

    Messages:
    4,356
    Likes Received:
    1
    Occupation:
    professor
    PhD students are normally used as research assistants in a University. Professors need to publish in order to get promotions and maintain their tenure track positions. A tenured professor wouldn't take a weak student even if the student does not want financial assistance, the reason for this is that a professor wouldn't be interested in investing time with a student with little chances of generating good publications.

    Online for profit schools pay professors to supervise students so a professor would be willing to take as many as he or she can supervise as this generates revenue for him or her. Online schools normally do not require online adjuncts to generate a number of publications so there is no pressure for them to get top students.
     
  14. gonenomad

    gonenomad New Member

    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think RFValve is on the right track. However, I do think it differs by discipline. My doctorate (Science Education) spanned two departments (Geology and Education). In the education department it was rare to see students on research assistantships. Some students did have assistantships; however, they were teaching assistantships. Often the education doc students were hired to supervise undergraduate student teachers. In the science department it was common for students to have research assistantships. I held two at various times. Usually the research assistantship entailed collecting/processing data for the supervising professor. This data is then used by the student for a MS thesis and the professor for a publication. Usually the student's name is on the publication as well.
     
  15. RFValve

    RFValve Active Member

    Messages:
    4,356
    Likes Received:
    1
    Occupation:
    professor
    It depends a lot on the discipline. I have heard of unpaid post doc positions in Biology or sciences as well. The course work oriented doctorates like DBAs or EDs tend to have more students than pure research PhD programs as they generate a stream of revenue to the school due to the course fees.

    The business model of the for profits with online adjuncts paid to supervise students make more sense as revenue generators. You can still get a quality dissertation if the school has good quality controls.

    Another problem with traditional B&M doctorates is that many faculties require PhD students to teach at least one course during their studies. This will also limit the amount of students intake. In addition, faculties tend to graduate only the number of PhDs that will be able to find jobs in their area in order to keep the prestige of the school. For profits on the other hand, hardly have teaching requirements and most of the students are already employed so placing wouldn't be an issue.

    I think that if a student wants to finish faster the for profit route also would be better. I went to a public school and my professors took their sweet time to read the dissertation. My supervisor almost took a year to read it and my examiners almost 4 months. For profit force online advisers to provide feedback within weeks so this speeds up the process. Things are also a lot more structured in for profits so this makes things faster. On the other hand, the mass production of PhD graduates of the for profits might also lower the quality of the end product. The lack of publication requirements is also a concern in the for profits.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 18, 2009
  16. RFValve

    RFValve Active Member

    Messages:
    4,356
    Likes Received:
    1
    Occupation:
    professor
    When I applied to the PhD at Charles Sturt, they required a dissertation proposal and a CV. The program can be finished entirely by external study. I decided to go for a DBA at USQ instead of a PhD at CSU for few reasons:

    -Tuition fees for a PhD were 8K AUD per year regardless of your part-time or full time status. At a expected 6 years of study, you are looking at 48K AUD. Instead, the DBA at USQ had a flat rate of 25K AUD regardless of the time it takes to complete the program

    -There are no milestones in the PhD program, basically it is all or nothing. I consider this approach very risky as if you have a bad supervisor, you might run into problems if he or she decides that your work has fundamental issues too late in the game. The DBA grants you credits by each delivery so you know exactly where you are and what you have achieved.

    I don't recommend the research PhD if you are going to do external study unless you are very disciplined and have a good research supervisor. These programs are not really designed for working professionals but for academics that already work in a University and need the PhD for promotion. Most of them require regular visits and publication requirements. A good publication might take one year to produce and publish, this might be too hard to achieve for working professionals.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 18, 2009
  17. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator

    Messages:
    15,150
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    welding engineer-welding inspector
    Location:
    between the devil and the deep blue sea
    I have heard of another problem that sometimes pops up. You might be humming along on your doctoral dissertation and everything is going great right up to the point when your advisor tells you he's leaving for a better position at another school. You wind up having to shift to another advisor who has all sorts of ideas about how you should change your dis. Just shoot me!
     
  18. RFValve

    RFValve Active Member

    Messages:
    4,356
    Likes Received:
    1
    Occupation:
    professor
    This actually happened to me, I started with one supervisor and had to change since my previous supervisor went for another appointment. Given that the DBA is structured, I did not have a problem as my credits were granted and my new supervisor only worked with me after the proposal was approved. In a traditional PhD, this could have been an issue as you are not granted credits till the end of your studies, a change of supervisor might have an impact in your studies as you might need to rework things to satisfy the new supervisor.
    I feel the financial impact is the most important issue when it comes to DBA vs. PhD. At most schools, you have to pay the same PhD fees regardless of your status and this could be a problem if you want to take a break between your studies. The pay as you go structure for the DBA makes more sense for the working professional with commitments. In addition, you are required to finish a research master's before you are admitted into the PhD, this is an extra year on top of the MBA if you don't hold this type of master's. Some schools can admit you directly into a PhD with an MBA if you can show that you finished some research projects as part of your studies.

    There is no doubt that a PhD is more prestigious than a DBA in academia, but the DBA is more suitable for part time study.
     

Share This Page