Difference between BA/BS and BAS (Bachelor in Applied Studies/Science)?

Discussion in 'General Distance Learning Discussions' started by sonny_jr, Dec 17, 2006.

Loading...
  1. sonny_jr

    sonny_jr New Member

    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Computer Technician
    Hello,

    I recently came across an old-time friend of mine that holds a BAS degree. Can anyone tell please explain what the difference is between a BA/BS and a BAS degree? Are BAS degrees marketable like BA/BS degrees? Or, are BAS degrees better or worse than their BA/BS counterparts? I'm quite curious since you really don't hear alot about BAS programs being offered by schools out there. From what I have gathered so far, a pre-requisite for a BAS is a AAS.

    Here are some programs I've come across:

    http://www.continuetolearn.uiowa.edu/CCP/bas/

    http://www.west.asu.edu/ias/bas/

    http://www.uma.edu/catalog-bappliedscience.html

    http://regionalcampuses.ucf.edu/programbas.htm


    Thanks kindly in advance!
     
  2. TEKMAN

    TEKMAN Semper Fi!

    Messages:
    3,704
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Cybersecurity and Information Security Consulting
    Location:
    Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas
    "The Bachelor of Arts (BA) and Bachelor of Science (BS or BSc) are similar in some countries, in that they are the most common undergraduate degrees. In the United States and Canada, both degrees consist of a general education component (matriculants take courses in the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and mathematics). They typically require students to declare a major, take a certain number of elective courses, and sometimes have basic skills components (writing or computer proficiency exams), however, in countries not requiring a general education component - such as Australia - the subjects studied likely are different in each degree.

    The BS degree typically specifies more courses in the major (or cognate fields) than does the BA degree. The BA focuses on creating a well-rounded graduate through formal study of natural sciences, social sciences, and foreign languages. The BS degree tends to be awarded more often in the natural sciences than in the humanities. In the United States, the BS is often awarded in pre-professional academic majors more than purely academic ones. The BA degree is used four times as often by arts and sciences colleges than by professional and technical schools. Beyond these differences, the variation between the BA degree and the BS degree depends on the policies of the colleges and universities.

    A Bachelor of Applied Science usually requires a student to take a majority of their courses in the applied sciences, specializing in a specific area, such as

    Engineering - General
    Biological engineering
    Chemical engineering
    Civil engineering
    Computer engineering
    Electrical engineering
    Engineering science and mechanics
    Mechanical engineering
    Mechatronics engineering
    Mining engineering
    Software engineering
    A Bachelor of Applied Science does not necessarily require the study of an engineering discipline, although many universities only offer Engineering Degrees as BASc (in Canada), instead of the traditional B.Sc.. For example, a Nursing degree is often offered a Bachelor of Applied Science. Majors may be taken in more practical applications of sciences such as applied physics or applied chemistry. Most universities that offer this degree require a rigorous course schedule (at the University of British Columbia, for example, Engineering students take on average twice the credit load as Arts students).

    A graduate of a Bachelor of Applied Science program receives the designation BAS, B.ASc., B.App.Sc or B.Appl.Sc for a major or pass degree and BAS(Hons), B.ASc.(Hons) or others for an honours degree."

    In my opinion that from more sicence to liberal arts are:

    =>Bachelor of Science
    ==>Bachelor of Applied Science
    ===>Bachelor of Arts

    Hope this answers your questions.
     
  3. pugbelly

    pugbelly New Member

    Messages:
    1,400
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Executive VP, Multifamily Housing
    Location:
    Frederick, Maryland
    A BAS is typically more career/field oriented and is usually a terminal degree, though not always. It's also not uncommon for the BAS to have fewer general education requirements than the BS and BA degrees. Yes, the BAS is marketable, but it may not have quite the utility as the BS or BA. For example, some BAS degrees do not meet the prerequisites for grad school.

    Pug
     
  4. Seanaviator

    Seanaviator New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Actually BAS degrees do meet the requirements to many Masters program... do your research!
     
  5. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator

    Messages:
    15,290
    Likes Received:
    16
    Occupation:
    welding engineer-welding inspector
    Location:
    Back from Wakanda
    Hi noob - Just a piece of friendly advice. If you're going to register for a discussion board and then, as your first post, dredge up an old thread and use it to criticize a long-standing member, then you'd better get it right. pugbelly clearly said "some BAS degrees do not meet the prerequisites for grad school." You, in turn maintain that BAS degrees do meet the requirements of many (not all) Masters programs. They are not really contradictory statements. You might both agree that "all BAS degrees do not meet the requirements of all grad programs (of course, all Masters degrees are grad degrees but all grad degrees are not Masters degrees. Remember those pesky Doctoral degrees?)
     
  6. Lerner

    Lerner Active Member

    Messages:
    2,568
    Likes Received:
    1
    Occupation:
    Semi retired
    Location:
    NY, NY
    I wander if someone with BAS degree and respected Masters degree will meet adjunct faculty requirements.
    How would BAS degree be looked at by colleges / universities etc tec.
     
  7. Rich Douglas

    Rich Douglas Active Member

    Messages:
    11,356
    Likes Received:
    0
    What, in this case, does "BAS" stand for? If it is a "bachelor of applied science," it can make a huge difference in some situations. In most, however, I would expect the difference between "BA," "BS," etc. not to matter too much. The degree and its major area of study will likely preponderate in most practical (read: "job hunting") areas.
     
  8. LearningAddict

    LearningAddict New Member

    Messages:
    904
    Likes Received:
    0
    Why would it factor in at all? Maybe I'm being naive, but I would think the Masters degree would take precedence over the undergrad degree at that point, since pretty much all schools require a Masters degree to teach.

    I think the concern might be in getting accepted to some grad programs with a BAS, but even then I have to believe there are more than plenty schools who would accept a student with a BAS, especially if the work is specifically in the field they're applying.
     
  9. nyvrem

    nyvrem Member

    Messages:
    528
    Likes Received:
    1
    what about Bachelor of Technology, or a Bachelor's of Philosophy !
     
  10. sanantone

    sanantone Active Member

    Messages:
    2,586
    Likes Received:
    1
    What is really important for grad school, outside of grades, test scores, and letters of recommendations, is meeting a specific major or specific course prerequisites. The type of degree shouldn't really matter as long as it has 120 credit hours or the equivalent in quarter hours. A BA or BS could possibly not meet the prerequisites because you don't have the right major or the right courses.

    For college teaching purposes, employers aren't going to care about your bachelor's degree if you're not using your bachelor's degree to qualify for the position. Some NA schools and certain vo-tech programs at community colleges will only require a bachelor's. Even then, I don't think a BAS will be a problem because these types of jobs tend to be in applied fields. When a position requires a master's degree, all they care about is having a master's in the subject or 18 graduate credit hours in the subject.
     
  11. Kizmet

    Kizmet Moderator

    Messages:
    15,290
    Likes Received:
    16
    Occupation:
    welding engineer-welding inspector
    Location:
    Back from Wakanda
    Assuming, as sanantone said, good grades, references, etc., many grad programs will give you provisional enrollment in the program pending completion of the missing course(s). So, for example, someone with a degree in Engineering Technology might be admitted to an Anthropology grad program if she completes the cert program at, let's say, a certain school in Kansas.
     
  12. Neuhaus

    Neuhaus Active Member

    Messages:
    2,738
    Likes Received:
    4
    Occupation:
    HR Business Partner
    Location:
    Syracuse, NY
    Never saw a BAS before. But I have encountered a few BPS degrees (Bachelor of Professional Studies). And, at least in New York, it isn't terribly uncommon to find someone with an AOS (associate of occupational studies) for some vocational programs. So, I can safely tell you that from a marketability standpoint, employers generally don't care.

    Job descriptions often specify that they require a "BA" wHen they mean to say that a bachelor's is required. The average HR professional and typical hiring manager (if there even is such a thing) outside of academia (or very specific fields where these types of differences are noticeable) have the experience with, or expertise in, these nuances to form an opinion either way.

    I have met a number of people working in various mental health disciplines who take oddly strong positions on the B.S. Vs. B.A. In psych argument as well as the occasional BSW vs B.S.S.W. sort of debate.

    So, that's from a marketability standpoint. I'd say a person's BBA is likely to be received just as well as their B.S.B.A. And my suspicion is BAS would be a similar situation.
     
  13. sanantone

    sanantone Active Member

    Messages:
    2,586
    Likes Received:
    1
    There is a member on the other forum who felt very strongly about earning a BS instead of a BA in Psychology. He said that anyone wanting to become a mental health practitioner should have a BS. That's why he chose Excelsior over TESC. His argument is that BS in Psychology programs include more science courses. That might be generally true, but that is not the case at Excelsior. In relation to all fields, the BA vs. BS thing is superficial. There is no standard for what a BS or BA should be. At some schools, the difference between a BA and BS is just a foreign language requirement. Some schools only offer a BA in the liberal arts (this includes the natural sciences and mathematics), but their programs look like your typical BS.

    But, what was most odd about this person's argument is that he said he knew a bunch of people attending Ivy League schools who said that most of the admitted students had a BS in Psychology. This turned out to be a lie because I found a list of doctoral students at one of those schools along with their bios. The overwhelming majority had a BA.
     
  14. nyvrem

    nyvrem Member

    Messages:
    528
    Likes Received:
    1
    Some years back I visited a friend studying in the UK. He was graduating after 3 years and moving onto his Masters in Engineering. He graduated with a BA in Engineering. He says it's just a token diploma the university gives on the way to completing an M.Eng. Nobody drops out with a BA. in Engineering.

    I thought it was interesting.
     
  15. sanantone

    sanantone Active Member

    Messages:
    2,586
    Likes Received:
    1
    In the U.S., it is rare (and maybe even non-existent) for a BA in Engineering to be ABET-accredited. This makes it more difficult to become licensed as an engineer, but not impossible in states that don't absolutely require ABET accreditation. In other STEM fields, the BA vs BS thing doesn't usually matter as much as people think it does. Besides, you don't need to be licensed to work as a chemist, biologist, mathematician, IT professional, etc.
     

Share This Page