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  1. #1
    me again is offline Registered User
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    Exclamation eGeneration decline in email manners, respect & clarity

    Has anyone else noticed a decline in online manners, respect and clarity in email correspondence from students of the eGeneration? Here is a sample:

    Quote Originally Posted by Verbatim student email to professor (in its entirety)
    Hello Johnny, I Already had written some of the assignment invd project last night, and was going to submit it in tonight, you didn't give me a chance to do that, you have already grade me, and that is sad.
    The sample student email to the instructor was addressed on a first name basis (and not to Dr. or Prof.) and it was not even signed with a name. Sadly, this appears to be an etrend of the eGeneration.
    MA, Franciscan University of Steubenville, Theology: in-progress online
    Info: http://www.franciscan.edu/academics/graduate-programs/
    Favorite scriptures: Rev. 11:15 & Luke 24:45

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  2. #2
    SteveFoerster is offline Resident Gadfly
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    Clearly, not everyone in college is prepared for college-level writing.
    BS, Info Sys concentration, Charter Oak State College
    MA in Educational Tech, George Washington University
    PhD in Leadership, U. of the Cumberlands (in progress)
    More at http://stevefoerster.com

  3. #3
    Tireman 44444 is offline Registered User
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    Goodness me. I get those all the time. I have had students refer me as:

    1. Hey Teach (yes, I am not joking)
    2. Yo Man
    3. Ma'am ( when on my syllabus and the course intro, it clearly states, Mr.)
    4. What's Up
    BA-History-North Carolina Wesleyan College
    MA-History-North Carolina Central University
    MLS-North Carolina Central University
    PhD-History (ongoing)-University of South Africa

  4. #4
    me again is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveFoerster View Post
    Clearly, not everyone in college is prepared for college-level writing.
    Two or three decades ago, an unbelievable study came stating that only 1 in 4 entering freshman graduated with a Bachelors degree in four years (at 4-year institutions). Today, is it significantly different?

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Cerabino
    At Arizona State University, the four-year graduation rate is about 34 percent.
    (Article: Cerabino: FAU isn)
    Quote Originally Posted by Leslie Patton
    Americans with a bachelor’s degree in jobs that don’t require that level of education was 44 percent in 2012, up from 34 percent in 2001.
    (Article: Starbucks to Pay U.S. Workers to Get Degree From ASU Online* - Bloomberg)
    MA, Franciscan University of Steubenville, Theology: in-progress online
    Info: http://www.franciscan.edu/academics/graduate-programs/
    Favorite scriptures: Rev. 11:15 & Luke 24:45

    LET'S DO THIS! https://www.facebook.com/TrumpForPresident2020/

  5. #5
    03310151 is offline Registered User
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    Not surprised at all how this newest generation is turning out. Have you seen their parents?
    “Suffering you need; literature is baloney.”

  6. #6
    CalDog is offline Registered User
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    Two or three decades ago, an unbelievable study came stating that only 1 in 4 entering freshman graduated with a Bachelors degree in four years (at 4-year institutions). Today, is it significantly different?
    The latest statistics in the US Dept of Education "Digest of Education Statistics" are for students who started college in 2005:

    - 38.6 % graduated within 4 years
    - 54.3 % graduated within 5 years
    - 58.3 % graduated within 6 years

    The rate has been lower in the past. For example, the 4-year graduation rate for students who started in 1996 was only 33.7 % (about one in three). No earlier data are shown.

  7. #7
    CalDog is offline Registered User
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    The latest statistics in the US Dept of Education "Digest of Education Statistics" are for students who started college in 2005
    As you might expect, graduation rates vary widely, depending on sex, ethnicity, and school type (i.e. public vs. private non-profit vs. for-profit).

    However, the single factor that is associated with the largest differences in graduation rate is: none of these. The most dramatic differences in graduation rate actually appear to be related to school selectivity. The six-year graduation rate for students starting in 2005 is shown below for schools with different levels of admissions selectivity:

    31.4 % - Open admissions
    45.3 % - Accepts 90 percent +
    56.4 % - Accepts 75.0 to 89.9 percent
    60.9 % - Accepts 50.0 to 74.9 percent
    70.0 % - Accepts 25.0 to 49.9 percent
    88.3 % - Accepts less than 25.0 percent

    These differences are much greater than the differences relating to sex, ethnicity, or school type.
    Last edited by CalDog; 07-01-2014 at 08:37 AM.

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  9. #8
    me again is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tireman 44444 View Post
    Goodness me. I get those all the time. I have had students refer me as:

    1. Hey Teach (yes, I am not joking)
    2. Yo Man
    3. Ma'am ( when on my syllabus and the course intro, it clearly states, Mr.)
    4. What's Up
    I just let it go without making any sort of correction, but it still irks me. How do you handle it?
    MA, Franciscan University of Steubenville, Theology: in-progress online
    Info: http://www.franciscan.edu/academics/graduate-programs/
    Favorite scriptures: Rev. 11:15 & Luke 24:45

    LET'S DO THIS! https://www.facebook.com/TrumpForPresident2020/

  10. #9
    me again is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by CalDog View Post
    As you might expect, graduation rates vary widely, depending on sex, ethnicity, and school type (i.e. public vs. private non-profit vs. for-profit).

    However, the single factor that is associated with the largest differences in graduation rate is: none of these. The most dramatic differences in graduation rate actually appear to be related to school selectivity. The six-year graduation rate for students starting in 2005 is shown below for schools with different levels of admissions selectivity:

    31.4 % - Open admissions
    45.3 % - Accepts 90 percent +
    56.4 % - Accepts 75.0 to 89.9 percent
    60.9 % - Accepts 50.0 to 74.9 percent
    70.0 % - Accepts 25.0 to 49.9 percent
    88.3 % - Accepts less than 25.0 percent

    These differences are much greater than the differences relating to sex, ethnicity, or school type.
    Good point. It demonstrates that open admissions does two things. First, it gives many students (who otherwise would not have a chance) an opportunity to go to college -- and many get a degree. Second, it reduces the overall graduation rate. It's opportunity v. graduate rates.

    At 38%, is Arizona State University open admissions?
    MA, Franciscan University of Steubenville, Theology: in-progress online
    Info: http://www.franciscan.edu/academics/graduate-programs/
    Favorite scriptures: Rev. 11:15 & Luke 24:45

    LET'S DO THIS! https://www.facebook.com/TrumpForPresident2020/

  11. #10
    CalDog is offline Registered User
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    is Arizona State University open admissions?
    According to College Navigator, ASU had an 80% admissions rate in Fall 2013.
    So not open admissions.

    Let's assume that the ASU admissions rate was roughly similar in 2005.
    In that case, ASU would fall into the Digest's "Accepts 75.0 to 89.9 percent" category.

    The Digest statistics indicate that schools in this category had an average 6-year graduation rate of 56.4 % for students starting in 2005.
    According to College Navigator, ASU had a 6-year graduation rate of 58% for students starting in 2005.

    So ASU 's 6-year graduation rate seems to be pretty much in line with its selectivity.
    Last edited by CalDog; 07-01-2014 at 09:07 AM.

  12. #11
    Tireman 44444 is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by me again View Post
    I just let it go without making any sort of correction, but it still irks me. How do you handle it?
    I let it go. I have to. I do start the email with:

    Ms. Jones and end it with Mr. Johnson. I always refer to them by their last names.
    BA-History-North Carolina Wesleyan College
    MA-History-North Carolina Central University
    MLS-North Carolina Central University
    PhD-History (ongoing)-University of South Africa

  13. #12
    CalDog is offline Registered User
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    The latest statistics in the US Dept of Education "Digest of Education Statistics" are for students who started college in 2005:

    - 38.6 % graduated within 4 years
    - 54.3 % graduated within 5 years
    - 58.3 % graduated within 6 years
    As these numbers indicate, most full-time undergraduate students fail to graduate within four years, and that statistic shocks a lot of people. However, many of those students don't fall short by very much -- they just need an extra quarter or two to finish up. In reality, most undergraduate students do graduate within five years, which is less shocking.

    So the 4-year graduation rate doesn't tell the whole story. In practice, the 6-year graduation rate is probably the most common benchmark.

    Example: Cal State Long Beach is one of the largest universities in California. For students entering in 2005, the 4-year graduation rate was only 12%, which looks absolutely atrocious. But that's not the whole story, because the 6-year graduation rate for students entering in 2005 was 54%.
    Last edited by CalDog; 07-01-2014 at 11:18 AM.

  14. #13
    SteveFoerster is offline Resident Gadfly
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    Hi CalDog, do these figures account for students who leave one institution and complete at another?
    BS, Info Sys concentration, Charter Oak State College
    MA in Educational Tech, George Washington University
    PhD in Leadership, U. of the Cumberlands (in progress)
    More at http://stevefoerster.com

  15. #14
    me again is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveFoerster View Post
    Hi CalDog, do these figures account for students who leave one institution and complete at another?
    Here is my illustrious institution-jumping timeline:
    AA 4 years
    BS 21 years
    MA, Franciscan University of Steubenville, Theology: in-progress online
    Info: http://www.franciscan.edu/academics/graduate-programs/
    Favorite scriptures: Rev. 11:15 & Luke 24:45

    LET'S DO THIS! https://www.facebook.com/TrumpForPresident2020/

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  17. #15
    CalDog is offline Registered User
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    do these figures account for students who leave one institution and complete at another?
    No, and so the reported graduation rates could be underestimates. As stated by the Dept. of Education :

    The 2011 graduation rate for full-time, first-time undergraduate students who began their pursuit of a bachelor's degree at a 4-year degree-granting institution in fall 2005 was 59 percent. That is, 59 percent of full-time, first-time students who began seeking a bachelor's degree at a 4-year institution in fall 2005 completed the degree at that institution within 6 years. ... Students who transfer and complete a degree at another institution are not included as completers in these rates.
    Note that the data are compiled by the schools, and submitted to the Dept. of Education . The schools have no way to track students once they've left. Suppose you transfer from School A to School B, and then graduate from School B. Obviously that does happen -- but School B does not notify School A about it. So School A doesn't know that you ultimately graduated, and will not include you in their graduation rate.

    Some schools, but not all, do report a "transfer-out" rate.
    Last edited by CalDog; 07-01-2014 at 11:53 AM.

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