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  1. #1
    Abner is offline Registered User
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    Special Ammo - Boar Buster Bullets - The Wild Boar Business is Booming in Texas


  2. #2
    decimon is offline Registered User
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    Conquistador your stallion stands in need of company
    And like some angel's haloed brow
    You reek of purity

  3. #3
    Johann is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by decimon View Post
    Conquistador your stallion stands in need of company
    And like some angel's haloed brow
    You reek of purity
    Procol Harum. 1967 - a very good year.

    We skipped the light fandango
    Turned cartwheels cross the floor
    I was feeling kinda seasick
    But the crowd called out for more...

    Their debut song - the same year.

    J.

  4. #4
    decimon is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johann View Post
    1967 - a very good year.

    Hong Kong: Saw the all-too-obvious Chinese-British divide. Interesting that everyone saw Americans as being in a separate category.

    Montreal, for Expo: Witnessed the French-English divide. Americans again seen as different.

    Couldn't find U.S. cigarettes in Montreal. Or at Expo. Except...at the USSR pavilion which sold Marlboro. I wasn't about to defect but I did appreciate that. ;-)

  5. #5
    Johann is offline Registered User
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    Popular Canadian historian Pierre Berton referred to the Centennial as "the last good year" in his book 1967: The Last Good Year.

    Yes - it was a good year. There were many Centennial Projects, including Expo.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Centennial

    There were many more Centennial projects at the Provincial level, including the Ontario Community College system. The campus where I am right now is one of those celebrating its 50th.

    Back then I could (and did) find American cigarettes - but I knew where to look. There was an International smokeshop downtown. I didn't like most American smokes, but made an exception for Camels about twice a year. I used to buy French Gauloises and/or Gitanes once in a while (what a poser I was!) and English cigarettes - Churchman's, etc. on the rare occasion I could afford them.

    I quit them ALL 40 years ago - Oct. 31, 1977 to be exact. Thank goodness! Now I have adult grandchildren I might not have even seen!

    J.
    Last edited by Johann; 07-16-2017 at 11:48 AM.

  6. #6
    Johann is offline Registered User
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    If 19th-century Americans could virtually exterminate the bison, from horseback or train, with six-shooters, I'm sure that today, the hogs can be completely exterminated, now that AR-15s, balloons and helicopters are in the mix.

    I understand the damage the hogs do, but it still gets to me, when a huge number of animals is killed and no use is made of most of them - food or otherwise. I know, I know - it's certainly not the first time.

    J.
    Last edited by Johann; 07-16-2017 at 12:16 PM.

  7. #7
    jhp
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    Calling it "boar" in the US is of course misleading. There were some boars both from Europe and Asia introduced into the US, and domestic hogs will interbreed.
    None in the picture appear to be pure boars. No long hair, lower hind quarters, no large tusks.

    They are significantly larger, yet just as wild and opportunistic.
    Wild hog is a huge problem and it is growing, specially for farmers and homesteaders.

    A domestic pig will go "wild boar" (feral pigs) in very few generations. It is actually quite amazing to see a "boar" just to find out granny was a domestic pig.

    Few thing are common all across - bacon, pork chops and such.
    Last edited by jhp; 07-16-2017 at 04:20 PM. Reason: spelling

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  9. #8
    Abner is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by jhp View Post
    Calling it "boar" in the US is of course misleading. There were some boars both from Europe and Asia introduced into the US, and domestic hogs will interbreed.
    None in the picture appear to be pure boars. No long hair, lower hind quarters, no large tusks.

    They are significantly larger, yet just as wild and opportunistic.
    Wild hog is a huge problem and it is growing, specially for farmers and homesteaders.

    A domestic pig will go "wild boar" (feral pigs) in very few generations. It is actually quite amazing to see a "boar" just to find out granny was a domestic pig.

    Few thing are common all across - bacon, pork chops and such.
    The wild boar in Catalina Island have little tusks and meaner than hell!

  10. #9
    Johann is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by jhp
    Few thing are common all across - bacon, pork chops and such.
    And footballs -- and pigskin gloves etc. Yeah! I don't eat pork, for one reason - I don't like it - but a pair of those gloves -- or maybe a briefcase. Now you're talkin' !

    J.

  11. #10
    Abner is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johann View Post
    And footballs -- and pigskin gloves etc. Yeah! I don't eat pork, for one reason - I don't like it - but a pair of those gloves -- or maybe a briefcase. Now you're talkin' !

    J.
    My wife's uncle killed a boar. He skinned it and made a pig roast. The meat was good!

  12. #11
    jhp
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    It just needs to be in the Family of Suidae, it can bless you with delicious dry rubbed ribs. Mmm.. mmm... mmm... Some nice, tangy collard greens and some sweet corn bread for side and I am all set.

  13. #12
    Abner is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by jhp View Post
    It just needs to be in the Family of Suidae, it can bless you with delicious dry rubbed ribs. Mmm.. mmm... mmm... Some nice, tangy collard greens and some sweet corn bread for side and I am all set.
    That's pretty much what we had. For some some reason, fresh killed meat tastes better than the stuff you buy at the grocery store already frozen.

  14. #13
    heirophant is offline Registered User
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