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  1. #1
    Abner is offline Registered User
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    Why this Ohio sheriff refuses to let his deputies carry Narcan to reverse overdoses

    Hmm,

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/ampht...wont-let-them/

    “We don't do the shots for bee stings, we don't inject diabetic people with insulin. When does it stop?” he told The Washington Post.

    “I'm not the one that decides if people live or die. They decide that when they stick that needle in their arm.”

    That seems kind of harsh. In my mind, police officers have a duty to save someone from death if they can. On the other hand, this Narcanan issue is like spitting in the wind.

  2. #2
    Bruce is offline Moderator
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    We were the first police department in the country to carry Narcan on patrol, I think we're around 500 reversals at this point.

    I understand the sheriff's frustration; we've saved the same people multiple times, even the same person multiple times in the same day, and it sometimes seems like it just gives the addicts a false sense of security, as well as a tacit message that it's okay to use opiates. However, they're still humans, and it's not up to us to decide who's worthy of being saved, and who isn't. I'm given a tool, I use it when it's necessary, and the politicians can fight about the rest.

    My personal opinion is that anyone saved from an OD with Narcan should be committed to mandatory treatment for at least 30 days; the long-term success rate of that treatment probably wouldn't be stellar, but if it gets even a small percentage clean, I think it's worth it.
    --
    Bruce Tait
    A.S. (Criminal Justice) Quincy College
    B.A. (Criminal Justice) Curry College
    M.A. (Criminal Justice) University of Massachusetts-Lowell
    M.A. (Forensic & Counseling Psychology) Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology
    Certificate (Investigative Psychology) CUNY-John Jay College of Criminal Justice

    MOOC's
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    Certificate (International Criminal Law) Case Western Reserve University
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  3. #3
    Abner is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce View Post
    We were the first police department in the country to carry Narcan on patrol, I think we're around 500 reversals at this point.

    I understand the sheriff's frustration; we've saved the same people multiple times, even the same person multiple times in the same day, and it sometimes seems like it just gives the addicts a false sense of security, as well as a tacit message that it's okay to use opiates. However, they're still humans, and it's not up to us to decide who's worthy of being saved, and who isn't. I'm given a tool, I use it when it's necessary, and the politicians can fight about the rest.

    My personal opinion is that anyone saved from an OD with Narcan should be committed to mandatory treatment for at least 30 days; the long-term success rate of that treatment probably wouldn't be stellar, but if it gets even a small percentage clean, I think it's worth it.
    Wow! five hundred reversals, if you think about that it's amazing. I also agree addicts should have to go in for reahab. Good job on saving lives man!

  4. #4
    RANSOMSOUL is offline Registered User
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    That number of saved lives is amazing and even if only a small percentage of them produce value into the world thereafter, it's an effort that feels worthy to applaud.

  5. #5
    Abner is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by RANSOMSOUL View Post
    That number of saved lives is amazing and even if only a small percentage of them produce value into the world thereafter, it's an effort that feels worthy to applaud.
    The role that the police play in this situation is vital to saving lives. They are hero's in my mind.

  6. #6
    Abner is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce View Post
    We were the first police department in the country to carry Narcan on patrol, I think we're around 500 reversals at this point.

    I understand the sheriff's frustration; we've saved the same people multiple times, even the same person multiple times in the same day, and it sometimes seems like it just gives the addicts a false sense of security, as well as a tacit message that it's okay to use opiates. However, they're still humans, and it's not up to us to decide who's worthy of being saved, and who isn't. I'm given a tool, I use it when it's necessary, and the politicians can fight about the rest.

    My personal opinion is that anyone saved from an OD with Narcan should be committed to mandatory treatment for at least 30 days; the long-term success rate of that treatment probably wouldn't be stellar, but if it gets even a small percentage clean, I think it's worth it.
    I am curious about something. Are people that are saved via Narcan charged for drugs or something? Are they pressed to give up who sold it to them? My nephew Od'D on something, and the doc called the cops who then charged him with certain things. Drub possession I guess.

  7. #7
    jhp
    jhp is offline Registered User
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    Average police salary in US: $61,270 (Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Employment Statistics Survey 2015)

    It might say it on a cruiser's door, but police do not have a duty to protect. Courts have ruled over and over that individuals have no right to police protection, or that police needs to intervene.

    An officer is constantly put into danger not just for their immediate life, but also for the rest of their professional life working the streets. They can be shot immediately, or destroyed by an overzealous prosecutor.

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  9. #8
    Bruce is offline Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Abner View Post
    I am curious about something. Are people that are saved via Narcan charged for drugs or something? Are they pressed to give up who sold it to them? My nephew Od'D on something, and the doc called the cops who then charged him with certain things. Drub possession I guess.
    I can't speak for anyplace else, but in Massachusetts, we can't charge anyone for possession of drugs at the scene of an OD, unless it amounts to possession with intent, distribution, or trafficking.

    I don't know about the Narcan, I assume that no one is charged money for it, but I can't say for certain.
    --
    Bruce Tait
    A.S. (Criminal Justice) Quincy College
    B.A. (Criminal Justice) Curry College
    M.A. (Criminal Justice) University of Massachusetts-Lowell
    M.A. (Forensic & Counseling Psychology) Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology
    Certificate (Investigative Psychology) CUNY-John Jay College of Criminal Justice

    MOOC's
    Certificate (Disability Awareness and Support in Higher Education) University of Pittsburgh
    Certificate (International Criminal Law) Case Western Reserve University
    Certificate (Psychology of Criminal Justice) University of Queensland
    Certificate (Classical Sociological Theory) University of Amsterdam



    RA Criminal Justice Degrees by Distance Learning - Updated 3/16/08

    NA Criminal Justice Degrees by Distance Learning - Updated 3/20/08

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