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  1. #1
    John Bear is offline Senior Member
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    Did Shakespeare write the Bible?

    There has long been speculation that Shakespeare was a principal writer/rewriter of the King James Version of the Bible. He was at the peak of his powers and fame at the time it was done.

    And there is that wonderful tantalizing clue (which some feel is the way he chose to sign his work).

    Shakespeare was 46 years old at the time the KJV was issued.

    Goest thou to the 46th Psalm.

    Count in until you get to the 46th word from the beginning. Note the word.

    Now count in from the end, until you get to the 46th word from the end.

    Neat, eh?
    Author/co-author:15 editions of Bears Guide to Earning Degrees by Distance Learning,
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  2. #2
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    Re: Did Shakespeare write the Bible?

    Whatever became of the controversey he never wrote any of the works attributed to him?

    The mathematics of Psalm 46 is interesting and amusing. I don't know if I can accept the Bard penned all or part of the Bible.

    Although, however, I understand he and King James got along swimmingly.

    Originally posted by John Bear
    There has long been speculation that Shakespeare was a principal writer/rewriter of the King James Version of the Bible. He was at the peak of his powers and fame at the time it was done.

    And there is that wonderful tantalizing clue (which some feel is the way he chose to sign his work).

    Shakespeare was 46 years old at the time the KJV was issued.

    Goest thou to the 46th Psalm.

    Count in until you get to the 46th word from the beginning. Note the word.

    Now count in from the end, until you get to the 46th word from the end.

    Neat, eh?

  3. #3
    Howard is offline Registered User
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    KJV Bible - pray tell, what is that?
    Howard Rodgers
    BS/MBA Univ of Ala at Bham
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    BA Univ of the State of NY (Excelsior)
    MA Liberty University
    PhD Capella Univ

  4. #4
    Rev. Andy is offline Registered User
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    Post Shakespeare

    That WAS interesting! see ref. web site.

    http://www.ac.wwu.edu/~stephan/webst...e/46psalm.html - 16k -

    Rev. Andy
    If I have done everything possible, then I have done everything I can...Andre Coindre, S.C.

    ASBS, Rhode Island Junior College
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  5. #5
    Jeff Hampton is offline Registered User
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    Re: Did Shakespeare write the Bible?

    Originally posted by John Bear
    Goest thou to the 46th Psalm.

    Count in until you get to the 46th word from the beginning. Note the word.

    Now count in from the end, until you get to the 46th word from the end.

    Neat, eh?
    This remind me of Farrakhan's numerology speach during the Million Man March.

    Neat, eh?

    Jeff

    "And If 6
    Turn out to be 9
    I don't mind,
    I don't mind"

    -Jimi Hendrix

  6. #6
    uncle janko is offline member
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    Wait. I thought George Lamsa wrote the King James Bible.

    Jeff: :p

  7. #7
    Tom57 is offline Registered User
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    If you spend enough time, I think you can find pretty good evidence that Alfred E. Newman wrote the bible. ;)

    http://www.math.caltech.edu/code/petition.html

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  9. #8
    brad is offline Registered User
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    Re: Did Shakespeare write the Bible?

    Originally posted by John Bear
    There has long been speculation that Shakespeare was a principal writer/rewriter of the King James Version of the Bible. He was at the peak of his powers and fame at the time it was done.

    And there is that wonderful tantalizing clue (which some feel is the way he chose to sign his work).

    Shakespeare was 46 years old at the time the KJV was issued.

    Goest thou to the 46th Psalm.

    Count in until you get to the 46th word from the beginning. Note the word.

    Now count in from the end, until you get to the 46th word from the end.

    Neat, eh?
    If you note - this post was number 2831 for John Bear. If you add 2+8+3+1 you get 14.
    Now count forward from the start of his message 14 words. Note the word.
    Now count backward 14 words from the end of his message. Note the word.
    Neat, eh?

    brad
    Linguist Certification - The Defense Language Institute
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  10. #9
    Jeff Hampton is offline Registered User
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    Re: Re: Did Shakespeare write the Bible?

    Originally posted by brad
    If you note - this post was number 2831 for John Bear. If you add 2+8+3+1 you get 14.
    Now count forward from the start of his message 14 words. Note the word.
    Now count backward 14 words from the end of his message. Note the word.
    Neat, eh?
    I hate to burst your bubble, Brad, but the post number displayed is a running total. 2831 is not the number of this post, but the number of posts that Dr. Bear has made up until today.

    Of course, there might be some significance to that as well. Today is 3-17. If you subtract 17-3...there's that 14 again!

    And if you add together all of the digits of 3+17+2004 and divide it by 14 and round down, you get 144.

    Also, Dr. Bear was apparently born on the "Ides of March," (or close to it...) certainly the most significant specific date mentioned in the works of Shakespeare.

    Spooky!
    Last edited by Jeff Hampton; 03-17-2004 at 10:42 AM.

  11. #10
    John Bear is offline Senior Member
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    This all just confirms everything. Thank you for these fine calculations.

    More:

    My birthday is 3-14. That is celebrated in San Francisco (at the Exploratorium) as "Pi Day" with exhibits, talks, etc.

    3/14/1592 (first 7 digits of pi) is the day that Shakespeare reappeared in London after having been "missing" (whereabouts still unknown) for seven years.

    My first published anything was a letter to the editor of Scientific American, when I was a college freshman. They'd run an article on mnemonic devices for remembering pi. Sentences where the first word had 3 letters, the second word 1 letter, the third 5 letters, and so on.

    I wrote (and why do I still remember this?), "Why a chap, I query, scientist or layman, would take the time probably necessary finding sentences for pi . . ." and so on, taking it out to many more places.

    Finally, Shakespeare had three daughters. So do I. One was named Susannah. So is one of mine. Two were twins. So are two of mine. None of them were named Sekhmet. Neither are any of mine. What else do you need to know?
    Author/co-author:15 editions of Bears Guide to Earning Degrees by Distance Learning,
    Degree Mills: the billion-dollar industry that has sold more than a million fake diplomas
    Not Your Mother's Cookbook: unusual recipes for adventurous books, 30+ more.
    www.johnbear.info

  12. #11
    Tom57 is offline Registered User
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    Somehow this all reminds me of the Monty Python sketch (I'm paraphrasing).

    "John Smith walked out of his apartment, and there was NO severed head in the bushes outside his window..."

  13. #12
    Guest
    Now if Shakespeare's real name was John Andrew Klempner...


    Originally posted by John Bear
    This all just confirms everything. Thank you for these fine calculations.

    More:

    My birthday is 3-14. That is celebrated in San Francisco (at the Exploratorium) as "Pi Day" with exhibits, talks, etc.

    3/14/1592 (first 7 digits of pi) is the day that Shakespeare reappeared in London after having been "missing" (whereabouts still unknown) for seven years.

    My first published anything was a letter to the editor of Scientific American, when I was a college freshman. They'd run an article on mnemonic devices for remembering pi. Sentences where the first word had 3 letters, the second word 1 letter, the third 5 letters, and so on.

    I wrote (and why do I still remember this?), "Why a chap, I query, scientist or layman, would take the time probably necessary finding sentences for pi . . ." and so on, taking it out to many more places.

    Finally, Shakespeare had three daughters. So do I. One was named Susannah. So is one of mine. Two were twins. So are two of mine. None of them were named Sekhmet. Neither are any of mine. What else do you need to know?

  14. #13
    John Bear is offline Senior Member
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    Jimmy quotes another Jimmy: "I've put in so many enigmas and puzzles that it will keep the professors busy for centuries arguing over what I meant, and that's the only way of insuring one's immortality."

    Many years ago, I went to a talk/concert by Carl Sandburg. Utterly charming. At one point, he fished around in his pocket and brought out a scrap of paper. "I wrote something on the way over here," he said, and proceeded to read a quatrain. He paused a moment, then said, "Hell, that's awful. Forget it." Then paused again and said, "You know, fifty years from now, someone will probably write a Master's thesis trying to figure out what old Carl Sandburg meant by that poem...."

  15. #14
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    Originally posted by John Bear
    Many years ago, I went to a talk/concert by Carl Sandburg...
    Wow! How lucky can one get?

    The days of the Sandburgs, Frosts, et. al. are over, I'm afraid.

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  17. #15
    Dennis Ruhl is offline member
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    Re: Did Shakespeare write the Bible?

    Wasn't that Paul Shakespeare??

  18. #16
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    Re: Re: Did Shakespeare write the Bible?

    Originally posted by Dennis Ruhl
    Wasn't that Paul Shakespeare??
    Actually it was Saul Simon Shakespeare!

    I like alliteration.

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