+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Han
    Han is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    1,912

    Professor Ratings

    When I was an undergrad there was a site on our campus network that students could put their opinions of professors and let other students know what to expect (like grading, test types, lectures, etc). Some of the descriptions got downright nasty, so the school shut it down, where a group of students reposted outside the school and kept it going.

    Now that I am teaching , I see a different perspective (funny how that happens). I have a debate going about me, and mostly good topics, but find this fascinating.

    Anyway, I wanted to see your thoughts. There is NOOOO moderation, cursing, etc is OK, becuase they want students to say it like it is - I like the idea, and know I can't respond, though I would like to
    Han

  2. #2
    angela is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    74

    Could Have other Uses!

    I know such a site is problematic, but I'd love to read the stuff about my prospective supervisor. All I know abuot him is the opinion of a couple of people and my impressions after one meeting. Have many people have an objective opinion of seomone after a first date?

  3. #3
    Tom57 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Northern CA
    Posts
    713
    When I was teaching high school, I became aware of this site:

    http://www.ratemyteachers.com/index.jsp

    I have mixed feelings about these sites.

    1. Generally, it's the students with less than favorable opinions that tend to post.

    2. Often there are not enough opinions posted to make any meaningful conclusions.

    If you check out some of samples from above, you'll see that some teachers have an average rating of 4.0, or something, but there are only two posts in the average, which doesn't say much.

    On the corporate side, vault.com, used to be a good place for anonymouts rants from insiders on a particular company. Again, you have to take it with a grain of salt. Some definitely have an axe to grind. Very few who love their companies will be motivated to tell the world.

  4. #4
    June is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    103
    I've used ratemyprofessors.com. I like the idea, but as was mentioned, not enough people post to really help. I also noticed that one instructor I just couldn't stand got a lot of positive reviews. The guy spent half the class talking about smoking pot and drinking beer. Apparently when you're 18 that's a plus.

  5. #5
    Ian Anderson is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Colorado, USA
    Posts
    5,066

    Re: Professor Ratings

    Originally posted by kristie7


    ..........Now that I am teaching ....................

    Congratulations on landing a teaching position (I assume at the college level) -- what type of school, what position, and what do you teach. What lessons can you pass on for other wannabe teachers .

  6. #6
    Han
    Han is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    1,912

    Re: Re: Professor Ratings

    Originally posted by Ian Anderson


    Congratulations on landing a teaching position (I assume at the college level) -- what type of school, what position, and what do you teach. What lessons can you pass on for other wannabe teachers.
    CSU at Sacramento. Marketing and Marketing Research.

    Lesson #1 - Take anything they give you (I took a 7:30 AM and a 6:00 PM class, just to get my foot in the door).

    Lesson #2 - Sutdents are HUGE flakes and wait until the last mintue for everything. (I didn't realize what a large percentage this really was).

    Lesson #3 - Some students will waste more energy coming up with excuses than doing the assignments. Let them drop one assignment and drop one test - that way you don't have to deal with make ups.

    Lesson # 4 - Students like structure, so if you change anything, it is basically written in stone and frustrating to some if you change things. I will not hand out my schedule next semester for the entire semester, becuase when things did change this semester, some people never caught up.

    It was a great deal of fun. I had 160 students this semester in 3 classes. I will do more exercises next semester, and less lectures. I am still in learning mode.

    I have been reading my reviews, and they are all true, and mixed. Some people didn't like how I "changed things", but I am a true marketeer, if I see some not likeing the lecture, I always had a back up plan / exercise.

    I kept e-mailing the Dean's, asking about availability of classes each semester, finally, after about a year to 6 schools, one paid off. Next semester is a question, but beginning the doctorate program, would be OK if they didn't offer, but only time will tell.
    Han

  7. #7
    seekinghelp is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    361
    This is interesting. As the mother of a 19 year old sophmore at the Univ. of Kentucky, I can tell you that he has experienced a pretty bad group of teachers , not all of them, but enough that I have to wonder where my 3,000 per semester is going.

    I know some students are just one step above morons sometimes, but our experience is that the ones who are there to learn have found the system, at least at this university, soarly lacking in quality and feedback for the student. Last year, it was only 2 weeks before the end of the semester in May before his English teacher decided to return graded papers from January. Doesn't give one much time to improve or figure out what the teacher wanted. Luckily my son is a gifted and excellent writer, but what if he hadn't been? Thus, he made his first change from English major to Sociology major and swore he'd never take another class beginning with ENG.

    This semester he had a TA neither he, nor any other students could understand, she is from somewhere in Russia and is teaching Greek and Roman history . By the time the semester ended last week, he was ready to quit school entirely.

    Yes, I could complain. But I don't think it will make any difference ultimately as UK is interested only in grad students and research. And besides, who wants to listen to a complaining mother? Not the dean of the English department, who I contacted. He referred me to another sub-dean in the freshman english department who never returned my calls.

    I wish you much luck teaching . Remember, there are those students who really do want to learn and want to participate in more than Drinking 101. I'm glad my son is one of them. Best wishes to you.

  8. Advertisement

  9. #8
    Han
    Han is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    1,912
    Originally posted by seekinghelp
    This is interesting. As the mother of a 19 year old sophmore at the Univ. of Kentucky, I can tell you that he has experienced a pretty bad group of teachers , not all of them, but enough that I have to wonder where my 3,000 per semester is going.

    I know some students are just one step above morons sometimes, but our experience is that the ones who are there to learn have found the system, at least at this university, soarly lacking in quality and feedback for the student. Last year, it was only 2 weeks before the end of the semester in May before his English teacher decided to return graded papers from January. Doesn't give one much time to improve or figure out what the teacher wanted. Luckily my son is a gifted and excellent writer, but what if he hadn't been? Thus, he made his first change from English major to Sociology major and swore he'd never take another class beginning with ENG.

    This semester he had a TA neither he, nor any other students could understand, she is from somewhere in Russia and is teaching Greek and Roman history . By the time the semester ended last week, he was ready to quit school entirely.

    Yes, I could complain. But I don't think it will make any difference ultimately as UK is interested only in grad students and research. And besides, who wants to listen to a complaining mother? Not the dean of the English department, who I contacted. He referred me to another sub-dean in the freshman english department who never returned my calls.

    I wish you much luck teaching. Remember, there are those students who really do want to learn and want to participate in more than Drinking 101. I'm glad my son is one of them. Best wishes to you.
    I am calling it the 15-70-15 rule. About 15% are there to lear, really interested, and go above and beyond the assignment. About 70 are there, and they are engaged, but overall just do the assignments and want to pass, the last 15% do nothing, but want everything. They are high maintenance.

    I have enjoyed it, but it was a learning experience.
    Han

  10. #9
    Han
    Han is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    1,912
    Originally posted by seekinghelp
    This is interesting. As the mother of a 19 year old sophmore at the Univ. of Kentucky, I can tell you that he has experienced a pretty bad group of teachers , not all of them, but enough that I have to wonder where my 3,000 per semester is going.

    I know some students are just one step above morons sometimes, but our experience is that the ones who are there to learn have found the system, at least at this university, soarly lacking in quality and feedback for the student. Last year, it was only 2 weeks before the end of the semester in May before his English teacher decided to return graded papers from January. Doesn't give one much time to improve or figure out what the teacher wanted. Luckily my son is a gifted and excellent writer, but what if he hadn't been? Thus, he made his first change from English major to Sociology major and swore he'd never take another class beginning with ENG.

    This semester he had a TA neither he, nor any other students could understand, she is from somewhere in Russia and is teaching Greek and Roman history . By the time the semester ended last week, he was ready to quit school entirely.

    Yes, I could complain. But I don't think it will make any difference ultimately as UK is interested only in grad students and research. And besides, who wants to listen to a complaining mother? Not the dean of the English department, who I contacted. He referred me to another sub-dean in the freshman english department who never returned my calls.

    I wish you much luck teaching. Remember, there are those students who really do want to learn and want to participate in more than Drinking 101. I'm glad my son is one of them. Best wishes to you.
    I am calling it the 15-70-15 rule. About 15% are there to learn, really interested, and go above and beyond the assignment. About 70 are there, and they are engaged, but overall just do the assignments and want to pass, the last 15% do nothing, but want everything. They are high maintenance.

    I have enjoyed it, but it was a learning experience.
    Han

  11. #10
    seekinghelp is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    361
    Your percentages are interesting. Would you say they apply to the teachers as well when it comes to a big public universities? When I got my nursing degree in 1998 from the community college, I had wonderful teachers . Most had Ph.D's, were engaged with their students, wanted us to do well. They were not easy, some were downright demanding beyond what I thought I was capable of. I worked hard in some classes (the sciences kicked my behind), not so hard in others. Perhaps being a non-traditional student led me to be more comfortable with them, I don't know. I used my experience with college to inform my son what school would be like for him (he was 11 when I started school). Turns out, it's nothing like I told him. He and I have had long talks about college. He felt he was more challenged in high school than the first two years of college. It's very disconcerting to him and me, especially since I'm footing the bill from my paycheck.

    I work daily with residents at the hospital, they all report pretty much the same thing, that the first two years of college were a waste. I feel something is wrong with our educational system when so many obviously bright and driven young people report the same thing. It seems that the first year or two of college should catch their imaginations and inspirations. Maybe there would be fewer college drop outs if schools were more accountable to the students, especially in the beginning. Maybe not. I just know I'm disappointed with the largest university in our state, one that professes to be working toward top 20 status.

  12. #11
    Han
    Han is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    1,912
    Originally posted by seekinghelp
    Your percentages are interesting. Would you say they apply to the teachers as well when it comes to a big public universities? .....

    Maybe there would be fewer college drop outs if schools were more accountable to the students, especially in the beginning. Maybe not. I just know I'm disappointed with the largest university in our state, one that professes to be working toward top 20 status.
    I would say (in my limited experience as a teacher ) that about 30% are only into research (not the classroom), 30% don't care (care to retirement maybe), and 30% do care - 10% don't know.

    It is a hard cycle, and I don't know how it started, but it is difficult to really teach students well when there are 100 students in a classroom. Much more is left to the student, than the faculty used to take ownership.

    Sounds like your son is accountable and doing well with the shift.
    Han

  13. #12
    Ian Anderson is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Colorado, USA
    Posts
    5,066
    Originally posted by kristie7


    I would say (in my limited experience as a teacher ) that about 30% are only into research (not the classroom), 30% don't care (care to retirement maybe), and 30% do care - 10% don't know.

    It is a hard cycle, and I don't know how it started, but it is difficult to really teach students well when there are 100 students in a classroom. Much more is left to the student, than the faculty used to take ownership.

    Sounds like your son is accountable and doing well with the shift.
    Is having 100 students in a class common at CSUS?
    Over 30 years the many classes I took had between 7 and 30 students. At CSUDH there are not many classrooms that would hold 100 students.

  14. #13
    Han
    Han is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    1,912
    Originally posted by Ian Anderson


    Is having 100 students in a class common at CSUS?
    Over 30 years the many classes I took had between 7 and 30 students. At CSUDH there are not many classrooms that would hold 100 students.
    When I was an undergrad, I had about 4 classes with over 100 in them. The rest between 30-60. Never under 30, I think they cancel them under 24 enrolled.

    I thought I had 30 per class, but when the class filled up, I had over 60 in each class. The intro classes are larger, then the electives as a senior are smaller.

    Is that normal?

    I didn't get as much student time in the class, so I met with many students who were struggling after class and via e-mail. Probably 100 e-mails a week. I met with at least 20 students a week. They were all great questions, and I think it helped, but very time consuming. I learned what works and what doesn't though, so I know next semester will be even better.

    I do have to say I had one mentor and one Chair of the department that were great. They answered questionsas I went along.
    Han

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts




1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197