+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 16 of 21
  1. #1
    ikibah is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    55

    using dr title from state approved school

    I'm a licensed masters therapist looking to get the "dr." title for some personal reasons. The cheapest program I can find to date is Ryokan's PsyD in MFT. However, this program is only state approved in Cali. Does anybody know who to contact in MD to find out whether or not this would legal /ethical to use the Dr. title with a Cali state approved degree?

    I.e would I contact the Psych board, Social work board, some other board??

    Thanks all!

  2. #2
    Kizmet is offline Moderator
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    between the devil and the deep blue sea
    Posts
    15,150
    Which board has issued your current license? Start there.
    American College of Sports Medicine

  3. #3
    RFValve is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Posts
    4,345
    Quote Originally Posted by ikibah View Post
    I'm a licensed masters therapist looking to get the "dr." title for some personal reasons. The cheapest program I can find to date is Ryokan's PsyD in MFT. However, this program is only state approved in Cali. Does anybody know who to contact in MD to find out whether or not this would legal /ethical to use the Dr. title with a Cali state approved degree?

    I.e would I contact the Psych board, Social work board, some other board??

    Thanks all!

    There is so much discussion in this board about the use of unaccredited degrees. As far as I know, only few states prevent you from using an unaccredited degree.

    The perfect example is a religious exempt degree. Many therapists get a PhD in Christian counseling or Christian Psychology for the only reason to use the PhD in a business card, this might not be ethical but it is legal in most states.

    I believe in your case it might be your professional association and not a state law that might be the problem. Some professional associations prevent members from getting an unaccredited PhD and display it in a business card so you would need to ask you association about this.

  4. #4
    b4cz28 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,823
    They will not be unaccredited for long or they will be gone.
    The Bible

  5. #5
    ikibah is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    55
    Quote Originally Posted by RFValve View Post
    There is so much discussion in this board about the use of unaccredited degrees. As far as I know, only few states prevent you from using an unaccredited degree.

    The perfect example is a religious exempt degree. Many therapists get a PhD in Christian counseling or Christian Psychology for the only reason to use the PhD in a business card, this might not be ethical but it is legal in most states.

    I believe in your case it might be your professional association and not a state law that might be the problem. Some professional associations prevent members from getting an unaccredited PhD and display it in a business card so you would need to ask you association about this.
    Thanks for this. I reached out to my board and they don't seem to understand the difference between state/regional/national accreditation. They just keep answering me with "yes there is no problem with using a doctorate for marketing " I keep pushing the question but they are clearly not knowledgeable on the topic.

  6. #6
    ikibah is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    55
    they're state approved and seeking regional accreditation.

  7. #7
    RFValve is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Posts
    4,345
    Quote Originally Posted by ikibah View Post
    Thanks for this. I reached out to my board and they don't seem to understand the difference between state/regional/national accreditation. They just keep answering me with "yes there is no problem with using a doctorate for marketing" I keep pushing the question but they are clearly not knowledgeable on the topic.
    So the answer is simple, they don't care. Sometimes the only people that they seem to care is in this board. The market is full of people with non accredited degrees and as long as they are not breaking the law, people won't be trouble. Self employed professions that normally don't need a PhD such as counseling , have plenty of people with non accredited Phds.

  8. Advertisement

  9. #8
    b4cz28 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,823
    Quote Originally Posted by ikibah View Post
    Thanks for this. I reached out to my board and they don't seem to understand the difference between state/regional/national accreditation. They just keep answering me with "yes there is no problem with using a doctorate for marketing" I keep pushing the question but they are clearly not knowledgeable on the topic.
    I doubt that. The person you spoke to doesn't understand as most government employees are the virtue of laziness. A quick check of licensing laws and of a few states shows that they do in fact care, the degree title must be in a related field in most places. You must look to state boards of education etc. for the unaccredited part, which many states care about. Texas and New York would not allow this. What state are you in?
    The Bible

  10. #9
    Jan
    Jan is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    288
    Quote Originally Posted by b4cz28 View Post
    I doubt that. The person you spoke to doesn't understand as most government employees are the virtue of laziness. A quick check of licensing laws and of a few states shows that they do in fact care, the degree title must be in a related field in most places. You must look to state boards of education etc. for the unaccredited part, which many states care about. Texas and New York would not allow this. What state are you in?
    Based on a previous discussion with a senior rep from the New York State board of Social Work and Counseling , an earned doctoral degree from an unaccredited school would allow one to refer to themselves as "doctor". New jersey on the other hand held more stringent requirements, indicating that the doctorate needs to be RA. However, regardless of the verbal feedback from any state board indicating that they would allow a licensed clinician on the masters level to refer to themselves as doctor with an unaccredited doctoral degree, it is essential to obtain this approval in writing prior to seeking an unaccredited doctorate. Verbal approval is insufficient, especially emanating from bureacracies such as state boards, whereby some rep can give verbal approval at one moment and subsequently the holder of an unaccredited doctorate is informed that they are in violation of the rules of the board or are misrepresenting their academic credentials to the public, which is a significant violation.
    Last edited by Jan; 04-21-2017 at 09:15 AM.

  11. #10
    Kizmet is offline Moderator
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    between the devil and the deep blue sea
    Posts
    15,150
    Quote Originally Posted by b4cz28 View Post
    as most government employees are the virtue of laziness.
    Fantastic! Because we love to make judgments of tens of thousands of people we've never met and have no knowledge of.
    American College of Sports Medicine

  12. #11
    SteveFoerster is offline Resident Gadfly
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Northern Virginia & Dominica, West Indies
    Posts
    10,893
    Quote Originally Posted by Kizmet View Post
    Fantastic! Because we love to make judgments of tens of thousands of people we've never met and have no knowledge of.
    On an individual basis I completely agree that there are many people on the government payroll who are hardworking -- like our own Matt Brent!

    But while stereotypes don't usually come from nowhere, this is probably an exaggeration:

    BS, Info Sys concentration, Charter Oak State College
    MA in Educational Tech, George Washington University
    PhD in Leadership, U. of the Cumberlands (in progress)
    More at http://stevefoerster.com

  13. #12
    Kizmet is offline Moderator
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    between the devil and the deep blue sea
    Posts
    15,150
    Quote Originally Posted by Jan View Post
    Based on a previous discussion with a senior rep from the New York State board of Social Work and Counseling, an earned doctoral degree from an unaccredited school would allow one to refer to themselves as "doctor". New jersey on the other hand held more stringent requirements, indicating that the doctorate needs to be RA. However, regardless of the verbal feedback from any state board indicating that they would allow a licensed clinician on the masters level to refer to themselves as doctor with an unaccredited doctoral degree, it is essential to obtain this approval in writing prior to seeking an unaccredited doctorate. Verbal approval is insufficient, especially emanating from bureacracies such as state boards, whereby some rep can give verbal approval at one moment and subsequently the holder of an unaccredited doctorate is informed that they are in violation of the rules of the board or are misrepresenting their academic credentials to the public, which is a significant violation.
    This totally makes sense
    American College of Sports Medicine

  14. #13
    b4cz28 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,823
    Quote Originally Posted by Kizmet View Post
    Fantastic! Because we love to make judgments of tens of thousands of people we've never met and have no knowledge of.
    I have worked for the government....most people were lazy. I worked with civil service people who refused to work more than hour a day. My point was not that, it was that just because your licensing board says its ok does not mean the board that regulates degrees would think it was legal . The employee is not going to check into it very far.
    The Bible

  15. #14
    Garp is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    550
    Isn't California Southern's PsyD as cheap or cheaper AND it is Regionally accredited.

    Rules vary state to state. So, one I am familiar with allows Licensed Professional Counselors to use "Dr." and the doctorate if it is accredited by an agency recognized by Dept of Ed and CHEA AND is in a related field. So, it could be a PhD in Counseling or a DMin in Counseling /Pastoral Counseling . Not a PhD in English or a DMin in Homiletics or a DBA. It could be Regionally or Nationally accredited but not unaccredited.
    Last edited by Garp; 04-24-2017 at 03:20 PM.

  16. Advertisement

  17. #15
    Neuhaus is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Syracuse, NY
    Posts
    2,726
    Quote Originally Posted by Jan View Post
    Based on a previous discussion with a senior rep from the New York State board of Social Work and Counseling, an earned doctoral degree from an unaccredited school would allow one to refer to themselves as "doctor". New jersey on the other hand held more stringent requirements, indicating that the doctorate needs to be RA. However, regardless of the verbal feedback from any state board indicating that they would allow a licensed clinician on the masters level to refer to themselves as doctor with an unaccredited doctoral degree, it is essential to obtain this approval in writing prior to seeking an unaccredited doctorate. Verbal approval is insufficient, especially emanating from bureacracies such as state boards, whereby some rep can give verbal approval at one moment and subsequently the holder of an unaccredited doctorate is informed that they are in violation of the rules of the board or are misrepresenting their academic credentials to the public, which is a significant violation.
    New York, for all of its regulations, does not have someone patrolling the streets looking for unauthorized signage or even searching the internet for unauthorized degrees on websites. Add to the fact that we have entirely too many mental health licenses all regulated by separate bodies and jurisdiction starts to become murky.

    You might get away with it just fine. But if you ever found yourself in trouble that degree might come back to bite you. Maybe you'd be perfectly fine from a regulatory standpoint. But just one unfortunate incident could send a case viral once someone discovers your degree is unaccredited. Newspapers would love talking about the "fake" doctorate or putting "Dr." in quotations. Granted, you might come out with license intact. But the collateral damage could be great.

    If the title was all I cared about for marketing purposes I would, at a minimum, go NA. At least it's defensible.
    M.B.A. University of Scranton (Anticipated 2019)
    M.S.M. (Project Management) University of Management and Technology
    B.S.O.L. Thomas Edison State University
    B.S.B.A. Colorado Technical University
    A.A. University of Scranton
    Certificate in Human Resources Management - Cornell University School of Industrial and Labor Relations
    Certified Employee Benefit Specialist (CEBS)
    Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR)

  18. #16
    ikibah is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    55
    Quote Originally Posted by Neuhaus View Post
    New York, for all of its regulations, does not have someone patrolling the streets looking for unauthorized signage or even searching the internet for unauthorized degrees on websites. Add to the fact that we have entirely too many mental health licenses all regulated by separate bodies and jurisdiction starts to become murky.

    You might get away with it just fine. But if you ever found yourself in trouble that degree might come back to bite you. Maybe you'd be perfectly fine from a regulatory standpoint. But just one unfortunate incident could send a case viral once someone discovers your degree is unaccredited. Newspapers would love talking about the "fake" doctorate or putting "Dr." in quotations. Granted, you might come out with license intact. But the collateral damage could be great.

    If the title was all I cared about for marketing purposes I would, at a minimum, go NA. At least it's defensible.
    I think this makes perfect sense. You put my feelings in a nutshell..

Similar Threads

  1. Does this ABA law school actually accept transfers from state approved schools?
    By AV8R in forum General Distance Learning Discussions
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 10-11-2008, 01:36 PM
  2. Using the title of Dr. with a CA state approved doctorate
    By simon in forum General Distance Learning Discussions
    Replies: 79
    Last Post: 02-09-2006, 07:17 AM
  3. how to tell if a school is really state approved?
    By gracie in forum Accreditation Discussions (RA, DETC, state approval, and unaccredited schools)
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 12-28-2004, 08:44 AM
  4. Legacy NCE report lists State Approved\0School
    By RJT in forum Accreditation Discussions (RA, DETC, state approval, and unaccredited schools)
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-14-2003, 04:53 AM
  5. Googling a Very Strong State Approved School
    By BillDayson in forum Accreditation Discussions (RA, DETC, state approval, and unaccredited schools)
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 07-23-2003, 09:37 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts




1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15