+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    kschule2 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    4

    Nutrigenomics: apply for masters or try for Ph.D.?

    Hello everyone,

    If you have any advice for me, I'd greatly appreciate it. I graduated 2 years ago with a degree in Philosophy and History of Science and Mathematics , but developed an interest in Epigenetics during my junior year. Since then, I have wanted to pursue research in that field and eventually plan on getting my Ph.D. IN the summer of my junior year and a bit during my senior year, I interned at a molecular biology lab at UMD. I did not manage to get anything published, but learned a lot of laboratory skills. That sort of opportunity wasn't available at my college.

    Unfortunately, during my senior year a couple of health problems came to a head and my gpa sank to a 2.9 from a 3.7 in my first two years. Since then, I have taken the following prerequisites and worked in an unrelated field.

    Chem I & II-- A, C
    Orgo I & II--A, B-
    Bio I & II--A, B

    GRE: 165, 156

    This Fall, I will be taking Genetics and Biochemistry.

    I know that I would like to study nutrigenomics, but have heard that doing a masters doesn't necessarily help you and is less economical. However, for obvious reasons, I am concerned that without substantial research experience and a less than stellar gpa, I may not have reason to hope.

    Again, any help is appreciated.



    What can I do to improve my chances for admission to a Ph.D. program without doing a masters or should I absolutely do a masters?

  2. #2
    Delta is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,115
    I have no experience in Nutrigenomics but with a poor GPA, getting a Masters degree with a high GPA certainly will increase your chances of getting accepted into a doctoral program!

    In addition, I have a few years of working part time as a clinical research coordinator and clinical sub investigator. The research experience strengthened my curriculum vitae and gave me a solid foundation for research overall! Typically, a Bachelor of Science and a Phlebotomy certification course may land you an entry level clinical research job! Once you have a few studies under your belt, you are golden!

    http://clinicalcenter.nih.gov/traini...ing/ippcr.html
    Last edited by Delta; 08-16-2013 at 07:39 AM.

  3. #3
    cookderosa is offline Resident Chef
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Illinois--> North Carolina
    Posts
    3,849
    Which program(s) are you considering for graduate study? Your answer matters, because nutrigenomics can be hard-core cutting edge science, or pseudo-science garbleegook. The pseudo-science schools will take you if your money's green. The cutting edge science programs are going to be selective. What do your science advisors say?
    Jennifer
    MS Applied Nutrition, Canisius College
    AA & BA Social Science, Thomas Edison State College
    AOS Culinary Arts, Culinary Institute of America

    The placebo effect should be kicking in any minute.

  4. #4
    Ted Heiks is offline Moderator and Distinguished Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Ottawa County, Ohio
    Posts
    13,301
    Quote Originally Posted by kschule2 View Post
    Hello everyone,

    If you have any advice for me, I'd greatly appreciate it. I graduated 2 years ago with a degree in Philosophy and History of Science and Mathematics , but developed an interest in Epigenetics during my junior year. Since then, I have wanted to pursue research in that field and eventually plan on getting my Ph.D. IN the summer of my junior year and a bit during my senior year, I interned at a molecular biology lab at UMD. I did not manage to get anything published, but learned a lot of laboratory skills. That sort of opportunity wasn't available at my college.

    Unfortunately, during my senior year a couple of health problems came to a head and my gpa sank to a 2.9 from a 3.7 in my first two years. Since then, I have taken the following prerequisites and worked in an unrelated field.

    Chem I & II-- A, C
    Orgo I & II--A, B-
    Bio I & II--A, B

    GRE: 165, 156

    This Fall, I will be taking Genetics and Biochemistry.

    I know that I would like to study nutrigenomics, but have heard that doing a masters doesn't necessarily help you and is less economical. However, for obvious reasons, I am concerned that without substantial research experience and a less than stellar gpa, I may not have reason to hope.

    Again, any help is appreciated.



    What can I do to improve my chances for admission to a Ph.D. program without doing a masters or should I absolutely do a masters?
    You admit to having a crappy gpa, but you say you want to get into a doctoral program without a master's? Not likely.
    Theo the Educated Derelict
    BA, History/Political Science, Western State College of Colorado, 1984
    MBA, Entrepreneurship, City University of Seattle, 1992
    MBA, Marketing, City University of Seattle, 1993

    Politics is made from two words: "poly" meaning "many" and "ticks" meaning "blood-sucking insects."

  5. #5
    kschule2 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    4
    Hi Delta,

    That's a great idea! I will definitely look into getting the certification.

    Thanks,

    Kaitlyn

  6. #6
    kschule2 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    4
    RE : Ted Heicks

    I definitely knew it wasn't likely, but wondered if anyone else had the same experience or any suggested alternative routes to the degree. My gpa was not poor overall, but fell drastically in my final year. Thanks!

  7. #7
    kschule2 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    4
    I know which programs you're talking about, and I am not interested in the pseudo-science stuff. Right now, I am looking into the biomedical masters programs at FAU, FSU, UF, USF. I have other hopes for my doctorate, but we'll see.

    I've already graduated and am taking the remainder of my prerequisites locally. So, I do not have an advisor at the moment. I will seek out some opinions from professors and advising when classes start up.

    It's pretty clear to me that I will have to do a masters.

    Thanks everyone!

  8. Advertisement

  9. #8
    Delta is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,115
    Quote Originally Posted by kschule2 View Post
    Hi Delta,

    That's a great idea! I will definitely look into getting the certification.

    Thanks,

    Kaitlyn
    Here is a free NIH course on Protecting Human Subjects:

    Protecting Human Subject Research Participants

  10. #9
    bstanh is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    3
    While a cumulative 2.9 GPA might look poor on paper, it's not a death sentence. Those in the graduate admissions review role do like seeing a positive trend in your final coursework--you often see where some schools will have a GPA qualifier for the last 60 hours of a program. In your case, the post-matriculation trend shows positive scores in more difficult coursework. The full year sequence of organic chemistry with an A and B- will signal improvement. Another thing the admissions people will look for are letters of recommendation from someone who can vouch for your research acumen and promise--really seek out research opportunities with the professors for your genetics and biochemistry coursework in the coming terms. If you have the time for it, the year long sequence of physics would only strengthen your case...and clear the pre-requisites to a PharmD program if you ever decide to pursue a professional degree. (A joint PharmD/PhD can be found in nearly any subject and the PharmD has the added benefit of providing an amazing salary since research can get hung up on things like, say, sequestration due to a sluggish economy)

    I'd also like to add that earning a masters on the way to a PhD is a nice stepping stone and shouldn't be seen to slow your momentum. Because you don't want a terminal masters degree, you can select a similar degree path at a school with a research interest in your area (and hopefully grant money to support you). Nutrigenomics is also an area of study at the cross-roads of many other fields of study and I'd recommend not getting hung up on pursuing programs with that title only. For instance, (aiming for pie in the sky here, because why not?) UC Berkley offers a program PhD in Metabolic Biology. Colorado State University has a host of amazing Masters programs in cancer biology, molecular biology, nutrition, and a PhD in Human Bioenergetics. There are a number of really solid research-oriented programs in Nutrition right now, so I hope you find what you are looking for and wish you luck.

  11. #10
    Kizmet is offline Moderator
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    between the devil and the deep blue sea
    Posts
    15,124
    Can you provide a link to the programs that interest you? I know nothing about these fields.
    American College of Sports Medicine

  12. #11
    bellearwood is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    2
    It is better that you apply for your Masters and try for Ph.D later. It will give you a better understanding about the thesis that you are planning to do for your Ph.D. I used to be big time confused about my career before. But ever since I attended a career training course, things have changed for good!
    Last edited by airtorn; 08-29-2013 at 10:12 PM. Reason: removed link

Similar Threads

  1. want to apply
    By Victor Osei-Wusu in forum Business and MBA degrees
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-03-2012, 10:06 AM
  2. How not to apply for a job
    By MrLazy in forum Off-Topic Discussions
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-13-2006, 08:21 PM
  3. Ready to apply
    By thesage43 in forum General Distance Learning Discussions
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-09-2006, 04:54 AM
  4. Is it okay to apply to several colleges at once?
    By Xarick in forum General Distance Learning Discussions
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 03-07-2005, 03:44 PM
  5. I think I will apply at Troy
    By etech in forum General Distance Learning Discussions
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 03-15-2004, 05:36 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts




1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197